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'bulling' or 'bullying'?
Thread poster: xxxLia Fail
xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 23:18
Spanish to English
+ ...
Sep 29, 2004

I have just heard mentioned the term 'bulling' (a psychologist speaking) on the Spanish news, in a report about aggression against schoolchildren by their mates.

Bullying is the term I would use in this context. Bulling is used in a farm animal mating context or to refer to stocks in a bullish market.

So my question is, would you use bullying or bulling in this context?

I am just curious about how this word may have been borrowed/where it was borrowed from.


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Sandra Alboum  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:18
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
It's bullying in the States... Sep 29, 2004

And you'd better agree with me or I'll beat you up!))))))

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Maria Luisa Duarte  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 23:18
English to Portuguese
+ ...
'bulling' not 'bullying' Sep 29, 2004

Términos como "mobbing", "bulling", acoso moral, acoso laboral o psicológico, son cada vez mas frecuentes y utilizados en los medios de divulgación actuales.
Saludos MLD


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Russell Gillis  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:18
Spanish to English
Bullying in Canada as well Sep 29, 2004

I can say this with 100% confidence, as it has been an issue brought up constantly at my children's school!

Russell


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xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 23:18
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Incorrect transfer, then? Sep 29, 2004

What I'm curious to know is whether it has been/is being 'transferred' incorrectly. (Reminds me of 'footing', which is the ES word for 'jogging', one wonders where it came from.)

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RHELLER
United States
Local time: 15:18
French to English
+ ...
bullying is the term I have always heard Sep 29, 2004

Hi Ailish!

Sandra, you are a comedian

comes from "to bully"...

although google shows several hits for bulling in Australia. I only heard of the bully who bullies; stop the bullying.

This has become a very hot topic after the Colorado shooting (Columbine High School).

NB: Footing is used that way in France also; jogging is a piece of clothing worn for sports!

[Edited at 2004-09-29 19:46]


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Kim Metzger  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 16:18
German to English
'terrist' or 'terrorist'? Sep 29, 2004

Ailish Maher wrote:

I have just heard mentioned the term 'bulling' (a psychologist speaking) on the Spanish news, in a report about aggression against schoolchildren by their mates.



Hi Ailish, couldn't it just be a matter of pronunciation rather than spelling? Some Americans give speeches about 'terrists' I'm told.

Cheers, Kim

[Edited at 2004-09-29 19:54]


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Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 23:18
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
would they be Sep 29, 2004

Kim Metzger wrote:

[Hi Ailish, couldn't it just be a matter of pronunciation rather than spelling? Some Americans give speeches about 'terrists' I'm told.

Cheers, Kim



Would they be nukular terrists


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Steffen Pollex  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:18
English to German
+ ...
Probably your explanation is perfect (I can't read Spanish) Sep 29, 2004

Maria Luisa Duarte wrote:

Términos como "mobbing", "bulling", acoso moral, acoso laboral o psicológico, son cada vez mas frecuentes y utilizados en los medios de divulgación actuales.
Saludos MLD


but what you are talking about is definitely called "bullYing", not "bulling".


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Maria Luisa Duarte  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 23:18
English to Portuguese
+ ...
bulling Sep 29, 2004

Hi everyone,

Alish said”I have just heard mentioned the term 'bulling' (a psychologist speaking) on the Spanish news, in a report about aggression against schoolchildren by their mates.”

She heard the news on Spanish television. The terminology used in Spain is Bulling and not “Bullying”. It’s an English word applied in Spanish. So, it has nothing to do with bad pronunciation or misspelling.

Hope that this helps to clarify the matter.

MLD


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John Bowden  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:18
German to English
As Jade from Big Brother might say.... Sep 29, 2004

Alison Riddell-Kachur wrote:

Kim Metzger wrote:

[Hi Ailish, couldn't it just be a matter of pronunciation rather than spelling? Some Americans give speeches about 'terrists' I'm told.

Cheers, Kim



Would they be nukular terrists


hank goodness there aren't any nukular terrists in East Angular....


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John Bowden  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:18
German to English
Well, yes... Sep 29, 2004

Maria Luisa Duarte wrote:

The terminology used in Spain is Bulling and not “Bullying”. It’s an English word applied in Spanish. So, it has nothing to do with bad pronunciation or misspelling.

Hope that this helps to clarify the matter.

MLD


But since there is no English word "bulling" or "to bull" with this meaning, and the English word which has been borrowed is clearly "bullying", of course it "has something to do with misspelling" - just as when Germans say "last not least", rather than "last *but* not least", or say a book has a "Happy-End" instead of a "happy ending", these were originally misspellings or inaccurate adoptions of the original English words - they, and many others, have now become perfectly standard German terms (not to mention "Handy" for a mobile phone) - but Alish's original question was whether "bulling" exists in English, and the answer is no!

Unfortunately, the fact that such non-existent words enter other languages means that native speakers frequently have to "defend" their own use of their native language, especially to young EFL learners - trying to convince French speakers that English uses "table football" and not "babyfoot" for example - (and I'm not talking only of English - does the term "maitre d' " exist in that form in French, for example?)


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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 23:18
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
cock-and-bull, don't bull me around, a lot of bull Sep 29, 2004

are three expressions that came to mind, but those have nothing to do with aggression.

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RobinB  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:18
German to English
Happy End Sep 29, 2004

John,

"Happy End"

is also, as I'm sure you know, the amazing name for a brand of toilet paper here in Germany.

It's right up there at the top with "Gammon", the range of men's toiletries (brings out the pig in the man?).

Ailish: of course it's bullying, but I guess it's now a castrated loan word.

And as John wrote, if you think it's bad in Spain, you should see how the Germans massacre the English language (a form of revenge, I suppose).

Robin


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