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Ideally suits for / ideally suited for
Thread poster: John Jory

John Jory  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:11
Member (2004)
English to German
+ ...
Aug 24, 2005

In a translation I have just submitted, the client insists that I change my formulation "XY is ideally suited for .." to "XY ideally suits for ..".
This makes my hair stand on end.
The Web only offers some 185 instances of "ideally suits for", as opposed to 918.000 instances of "ideally suited for".

Possibly I have been in Germany too long and have missed out on language developments.

Would be interested to hear comments from lingusitic experts.

[Edited at 2005-08-24 10:27]


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Sara Freitas
France
Local time: 22:11
French to English
Their version sounds funny to me, too Aug 24, 2005

I'm a native US-English speaker who has been out of the country since 1997, though.

For what it's worth!

Sara


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Amy Williams  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:11
Italian to English
+ ...
Ideally suits for / ideally suited for Aug 24, 2005

I've never heard it either. It sounds very awkward. Was this an EN native speaker client, John?

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Spencer Allman
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:11
Finnish to English
Ideally suits for Aug 24, 2005

is not English

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Marijke Singer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:11
Dutch to English
+ ...
Suited is used as an adjective in this context (I think) Aug 24, 2005

Oxford dictionary

suit
· v.
1 be convenient for or acceptable to. Ø (suit oneself) act entirely according to one’s own wishes. Ø [as adj. suited] appropriate or fitting. Ø (suit something to) archaic adapt or make something appropriate for.


[Edited at 2005-08-24 10:53]


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:11
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
I think you client is wrong Aug 24, 2005

I'm a native UK English speaker, and to me, your version is perfectly correct and your client's is wrong. For all I know it might have been good US English, but I see you have already had a reply from a native US-English speaker saying she doesn't like it either, so I hope you can persuade your client to accept your point of view on this.

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Kurt Porter  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:11
Russian to English
+ ...
Ideally suits/ ideally suited for Aug 24, 2005

Does that suit you? It suits me just fine.

However, "Mr. Smith is ideally suited for this position."

Don't sweat it too much. I had one last week where I wanted to smack the Program Manger. I provided a great version (IMHO) in English for a particular sentence that would have appealed to the American-targeted audience and the Program Manager said, "Why didn't you say this? After explaining to him that translating it that way would grate on the American ear, the PM said, "But the boss likes it." I replied, "Ok...you're the client."

You can try to point out, but sometimes they have to fall on their sword before they believe you.

Best,
Kurt


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Michele Fauble  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:11
Member (2006)
Norwegian to English
+ ...
'Suited for' Aug 24, 2005

Most, if not all, of the web site occurrences of 'ideally suits for' are by non-native speakers. 'Suited for' is the only form I find acceptable and that I would use.








[Edited at 2005-08-24 12:14]

[Edited at 2005-08-24 12:17]


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Sara Freitas
France
Local time: 22:11
French to English
Good point! Aug 24, 2005

Kurt Porter wrote:

the PM said, "But the boss likes it." I replied, "Ok...you're the client."





If I had a dollar for every time I had to accept the "corrections" of non-native clients...The most recent incident was a client who insisted that "bona fide" didn't exist in English...I was tempted to send the entry from Merriam Webster, but better judgment prevailed

Sometimes the relationship is more important than being "right" (even when you *know* you are)

Sara


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xxxIanW
Local time: 22:11
German to English
+ ...
Oh to be a policeman ... Aug 24, 2005

Oh to be a policeman, where the customer is always wrong ...

Seriously, though, the customer is king ... but you shouldn't let your king run onto an open blade. Your version is right, the customer's is wrong and you're the expert. Simple as that. And if they insist, get it in writing to cover yourself.

Annoyed from Cologne


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Michelle Lozano-Persons
United States
Local time: 15:11
Spanish to English
Ideally suited for Aug 24, 2005

I think you're correct and the client is mistaken. I am a native English speaker living in the U.S., and I don't think I've ever heard "ideally suits for" before. Gramatically speaking, I think this is a passive verb or perhaps, as someone said, an adjective. I don't know the context of the phrase, but if, for example, the text said, "The room is perfectly suited for meetings." we mean something equivilent to "The room is perfectly made for meetings." The room does not do the suiting or making, but rather another person or thing, whether or not the person or thing is explicitly mentioned. Could it be that you're client heard somewhere not to use passive voice and is taking that to an extreme?

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Kim Metzger  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 15:11
German to English
Negative transfer Aug 24, 2005

"Also known as interference, is the use of a native-language pattern or rule which leads to an ERROR or inappropriate form in the target language. For example, a French learner of English may produce the incorrect sentence 'I am here since Monday' instead of 'I have been here since Monday' because of the transfer of the French pattern 'je suis ici depuis lundi'." Longman Dictionary of Language Teaching & Applied Linguistics

John, please let us know what the German sentence was. I'd like to see if I can come up with a linguistic explanation of your client's error.



[Edited at 2005-08-24 16:52]


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Can Altinbay  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:11
Japanese to English
+ ...
The web has 185 too many matches Aug 24, 2005

John Jory wrote:

In a translation I have just submitted, the client insists that I change my formulation "XY is ideally suited for .." to "XY ideally suits for ..".
This makes my hair stand on end.
The Web only offers some 185 instances of "ideally suits for", as opposed to 918.000 instances of "ideally suited for".

Possibly I have been in Germany too long and have missed out on language developments.

Would be interested to hear comments from lingusitic experts.

[Edited at 2005-08-24 10:27]


Your client's version is improper English. It's not even used in business English! I have lived and worked in the US for over 30 years. I'm happy to hear from my colleagues that such corruption has not occurred in the UK, either.

One days yore client tok prity tu.
foo


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Can Altinbay  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:11
Japanese to English
+ ...
One of the 268 matches I got for "ideally suits for" Aug 24, 2005

http://www.sicomponents.com/lng_overview.html

We are doomed.


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John Jory  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:11
Member (2004)
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Overwhelming response Aug 24, 2005

Thanks to all of you for your input.
It's good to receive so much confirmation for my gut-feel.

This was just one of several doubtful 'corrections' made to my translation, but the only one that got me wondering. The backup material I was given was also highly questionable.

Meanwhile, I have made the changes (grrr), and told the agency that I would prefer not to work for this client again.

@ Amy Williams: I don't know who did the proofreading for the client, but I doubt that is was a native English speaker. My suspicion is that it's a more or less literal translation of "ideal geeignet für".

¤ Kim Metzger: Here's the 'corrected' sentence: "The product XY ideally suits for applications such as signage, exhibitions and shop fitting." (my translation was '..is ideally suited for ..')

The German is: "Das Produkt XY eignet sich ideal für Anwendungen wie Beschilderungen, Messe- und Ladenbau."


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