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Canadians take offence at bloody ad's beer offer
Thread poster: A Hayes
A Hayes
Australia
Local time: 17:56
Mar 26, 2006

FIRST it was "bloody", then it was "hell" and now it's "beer" itself that's tripping up an Australian tourism advertising campaign.

The recently launched and now controversial advertisement which concludes with the tagline "where the bloody hell are you?" has now run foul of the Canadian regulator.

But it's not the tagline that's the trouble this time as much as the opener: "I've bought you a beer".

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,18562350%5E29677,00.html

The Australian - WWWeird

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You can view the ad here http://www.wherethebloodyhellareyou.com/

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More on this issue

The following article was posted on another forum (Source: World Wide Words
http://www.worldwidewords.org/index.htm)

Topical words: Bloody

"So where the bloody hell are you?" is the punchline of a print and television advertising campaign launched by Tourism Australia last month. It features Australians relaxing in beautiful settings, with lines like "We've poured you a beer", "We've got the sharks out of
the pool", and "We've saved you a spot on the beach", ending with a nubile bikini-clad blonde uttering the line. (To see the ad, visit http://www.wherethebloodyhellareyou.com/ .)

You might not believe, let alone understand, all the fuss this has caused. Critics within Australia argued that the line is crude and will remind people of the outdated boorish and aggressive image of the Australia of previous decades. And prime minister John Howard couldn't bring himself to utter the slogan when asked to do so by
an Australian radio interviewer. The kerfuffle would have remained confined to Australia had not the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre (BACC) banned it from television screens in the UK.

Americans might guess the offensive word is "hell", which is still an expletive with some force in that country. But no, it's "bloody" that's causing all the spluttering and high blood pressure, a word that Americans have never much used, but which Australians took to their hearts well over a century ago. The tourism minister, Fran Bailey, argues that it isn't at all offensive. "It's the great Australian adjective. We all use it, it's part of our language." That's largely true for Australia, but not for Britain. [...]


[Edited at 2006-03-26 05:18]


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Ballistic  Identity Verified
Belgium
Local time: 08:56
Member
English to Dutch
+ ...
Bloody Mar 26, 2006

Bloody ridiculous if you ask me.

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KathyT  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 18:56
Japanese to English
Bloody excellent!! Mar 26, 2006

Tee Hee...As they say, "even bad press is good press!!"

From "The Australian" news site quoted by A Hayes:
(Tourism Minister) Ms Bailey said she had been told in London the controversy had itself generated "millions of pounds" worth of free publicity.


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Rebecca Hendry  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:56
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Very effective ad Mar 26, 2006

This is one tourism advert that actually works - it really makes me want to visit Australia. And as Kathy says, there's no such thing as bad publicity!

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Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:56
Member (2004)
English to Italian
Very Australian... Mar 26, 2006

only if you don't know Australian culture (?...) well you can take offence. This is very Australian and it works bloody well.... I don't see any problem with it.


Giovanni

[Edited at 2006-03-26 11:48]


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María Teresa Taylor Oliver  Identity Verified
Panama
Local time: 02:56
English to Spanish
+ ...
Very Australian indeed! Mar 26, 2006

And the images are absolutely gorgeous!

It's very effective, makes me wish I was in Australia right now


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Rosa Maria Duenas Rios  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:56
Canadians take offence at bloody ad's beer of Mar 26, 2006

I liked the add; I'd say too much fuss, but I do not understand why the Canadians are mad too?

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xxxsarahl
Local time: 23:56
English to French
+ ...
wow! Mar 26, 2006

I'm on the next plane to downunder!

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Francisco Pavez  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 23:56
English to Spanish
+ ...
No words Mar 26, 2006

The bloody CRTC can go where they wish, I'm going to Australia ; )

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Brie Vernier  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 08:56
German to English
Bloody hell ... Mar 26, 2006

I'm there!!

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#41698 (LSF)
Malaysia
Local time: 15:56
Japanese to English
+ ...
That must be a bloody big pair of scissors! Mar 26, 2006

I know that the four letter word "F***" would probably be censored out from American films before they go on prime time in some of the Asian countries.

But for western society to be bothered by "bloody" and "hell"? That must be an awfully bigger pair of scissors!

[Edited at 2006-03-27 00:45]


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RB Translations  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 18:56
English to Italian
+ ...
General no brand beer Mar 27, 2006

It is my understanding that Canada objected to the fact that the ad simply said "We have poured you a beer" without specifing a brand name. At least this is what was said on the news. I honestly do not understand it, but then I am not familiar with Canadian advertising laws and regulations.
I think the ad is good and now that it has been banned in two countries and following all the fuss that was made about it it will probably work even better than what had been orginally planned.


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 08:56
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Coming from Denmark... Mar 27, 2006

it really does look like a storm in a teacup...

or in a glass of water as they say over here. Or do they mean a beer can? My husband was in Australia in the 60s and his one big dream is to go back. I'm sure I'd love it too.

The thing you are not supposed to say is a very typical Danish expletive: 'Vorherrebevares!'

(Which means, as Dickens's Tiny Tim said I believe, God bless us all!)



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A Hayes
Australia
Local time: 17:56
TOPIC STARTER
fun and games Mar 27, 2006

Roberta Bazzoni wrote:
I think the ad is good and now that it has been banned in two countries and following all the fuss that was made about it it will probably work even better than what had been orginally planned.


I reckon!

In any case, I think it's a great ad and I'm glad most of you liked it too. Let me know when you're coming over Ñ)


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