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translation of English slang - how to do the analysis?
Thread poster: lignina
lignina
Local time: 11:08
English to Polish
May 18, 2006

I have samples of slang and their translation, but no methodological help. My task is to check the effectiveness of the Polish translation of English slang. I've already provided heoretical part for my dissertation from Hatim and Mason, and Korzeniowska, but they don't actually say ow to do the analysis of this kind.

If anybody knew anything in this area of analysis, please help. I would be really grateful.

Regards


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zabrowa
Local time: 11:08
It depends May 19, 2006

This depends on what kind of analysis you´d like to do, be it syntactic, semantic, or whatever. As to `the effectiveness´of a translation, this seems a very vague term. What is an ´effective´translation? Should it have the same semantic structure or just refer to the same sort of thing/mood/circumstance? These are preliminary questions you need to think about. Polish-English slang is very different indeed so good luck! Let me know if you have some specific question.

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lignina
Local time: 11:08
English to Polish
TOPIC STARTER
thanks May 19, 2006

Thank for your reply Matt, it has been a real help to me, as it has never crossed my mind to define what an effective translation is... now I have a hint to do this

My supervisor did not specify the area of effectiveness, but the samples of slang I compiled are of different forms: single words, phrases and sentences, but I wanted to focus on the effectiveness in meaningful translation, whether translated pieces of English slang ment the same in Polish. I am not sure if this is a good direction.

And I will appreciate any further help


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Jerónimo Fernández  Identity Verified
English to Spanish
+ ...
A hint May 19, 2006

Hi Lignina,

Back at uni (Translation Studies at Granada University, in Spain), we translated Irvine Welsh's book "Trainspotting".

To make sure the Spanish had the same level of pragmatism as the English we'd check the terms/expression against several parameters.

For this we used a table, eg:

Term in English: footie
Meaning: football
Vulgar: No
Pejorative: No
Familiar: Yes
Common: Yes
Taboo: No

Hence we needed a term in Spanish that would mean "football", that would be familiar, common, not vulgar, not pejorative not taboo. So we went:

Term in Castilian Spanish: fútbol
Vulgar: No
Pejorative: No
Familiar: Yes
Common: Yes
Taboo: No

And so on and so forth.

Unfortunately I don't have such work at hand, so I can't send it to you, but hope this hint helps you enough.

Kind regards,
Jerónimo


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Richard Creech  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:08
French to English
+ ...
Trainspotting was not written in English May 19, 2006



Back at uni (Translation Studies at Granada University, in Spain), we translated Irvine Welsh's book "Trainspotting".

To make sure the Spanish had the same level of pragmatism as the English we'd check the terms/expression against several parameters.


FYI, this book was written in Scots, not English. Scots and English are no more the same language than Castilian, Catalan and Galician are. Scots is now widely recognized by linguists, and the European Bureau for Lesser-Used Languages, as a language in its own right, and indeed it is one that a majority of the inhabitants of Scotland have some proficiency in. Scots, like modern English, is a Germanic language descended from Anglo-Saxon, but is more heavily influenced by the Scandinavian invasions, and less by the Norman one, than English is. It should not be confused with the Celtic language Scots-Gaelic which is spoken by a small handful of people.


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 11:08
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Trainspotting was not written in Scots May 19, 2006

Richard Creech wrote:
FYI, this book was written in Scots, not English.


AFAIK Trainspotting was written in an Edinburgh slang dialect of Scottish English. This dialect contains a lot of Scots words and spelling forms, but ultimately it is English, not Scots.

I agree with the rest of your post.


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Jerónimo Fernández  Identity Verified
English to Spanish
+ ...
Thanks Richard Jun 3, 2006

Richard Creech wrote:

FYI, this book was written in Scots, not English. Scots and English are no more the same language than Castilian, Catalan and Galician are. Scots is now widely recognized by linguists, and the European Bureau for Lesser-Used Languages, as a language in its own right, and indeed it is one that a majority of the inhabitants of Scotland have some proficiency in. Scots, like modern English, is a Germanic language descended from Anglo-Saxon, but is more heavily influenced by the Scandinavian invasions, and less by the Norman one, than English is. It should not be confused with the Celtic language Scots-Gaelic which is spoken by a small handful of people.


Richard,

First off, sorry I didn't reply sooner.

Secondly, thanks very much for pointing this out. Now I have another language to add to my CV

Kind regards,
Jerónimo



[Edited at 2006-06-03 13:38]


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