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False Friends
Thread poster: AleksandraGr
AleksandraGr
Local time: 17:37
English
Jan 13, 2007

Hello!
I am interested in "False Friends".I need them for my studies.Do you know any books or articles where this problem occured?Thank you

[Edited at 2007-01-13 21:23]


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Kim Metzger  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 10:37
German to English
False friends Jan 15, 2007

Hi Aleksandra - here's something from Wikipedia to get you started:

"False friends are pairs of words in two languages (or letters in two alphabets) that look and/or sound similar, but differ in meaning.
False cognates, by contrast, are similar words in different languages that appear to have a common historical linguistic origin (regardless of meaning) but actually do not. The phrase false cognates is also sometimes used to mean false friends.

Words like "hot dog" can come out lost in translation, and especially since words carry different connotations in different areas; Richard Lederer, an author and professor of English, once went to Germany and asked a vendor for a heißen Hund (a literal translation of "hot dog"). The vendor broke out laughing, for in German, heißer Hund suggests a dog in heat (Germans use the English term "hot dog" as a loan phrase).

For an extensive list of false friends see List of false friends."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_friend


[Edited at 2007-01-15 01:23]


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Francina  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:37
Member (2005)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Previous discussion Jan 15, 2007

Hi Aleksandra,
There was a discussion on this topic just last month. See http://www.proz.com/topic/60512.
Francina


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Giuliana d'Orazi Flavoni
Italy
Local time: 17:37
Italian to English
IT>EN Jan 15, 2007

Hello

If you're interested in IT>


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Henk Peelen  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 17:37
Member (2002)
German to Dutch
+ ...
Some English Dutch ones Jan 16, 2007

First of all wikipedia is a good source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_false_friends

I think in all languages they have the same name. German: falsche Freunde. Dutch: valse vrienden
I use to collect false friends. With a false friend I mean a word that's identical in two languages, but has a different meaning in this two languages.
Here are a lot English Dutch ones. Tell me if you are interested in other ones

are (= the pronoun are, but not the verb)
arm (= arm, but also poor, needy, and not weapon or twig, branch)
arts (= doctor, physician)
as (= ash(es))
at (= past tense singular of the verb "eten" = eat)
bad (= past tense singular of the verb "bidden" = pray)
bade (= subjunctive of the verb "baden" = bath, roll in, wallow, swim)
bag (= rutabaga, Swedish turnip)
baker (= dry nurse)
bale (= subjunctive of the verb “balen” = be fed up with, have got a bellyful of)
balk (= beam)
bang (= afraid)
beef (= first person present of the verb “beven” = shake, tremble, shiver, quiver, quaver, quake)
been (= leg)
beer (= bear)
beest (= animal)
beet (= beet, but also bite and singular of the verb "bijten"= bite)
beg (= berry, Turkish title of honor)
beldame (= lady working at a callcenter or a telephone whore)
ben (= first person present of the verb “zijn” = be. Striking: “ben” obviously is more akin to “be” and “been” than the English equivalent “am”)
bent (= second person present of the verb “zijn” = be)
berk (= birch)
bevel (= command)
beware (= subjunctive of the verb “bewaren” = keep, retain, save, maintain, preserve from, save from)
bid (= first person present tense of the verb "bidden" = pray)
bidden (= infinitive of the verb "bidden" = pray)
bier (= beer)
big (= piglet, piggy)
bits (= snappy, curt, brusque, short, short-spoken, short-tempered, sharp(-tongued)
blanco)
blank (= white, fair, clear, bright, pure, naked, flooded)
blaze (subjunctive of the verb “blazen” = blow, sound, snort, breathe into a breathalyser / drunkometer
blazer (= somebody who blows; player of a wind instrument)
bolder (= bollard, dolphin, bitt)
bolt (= third person singular of verb “bollen” = bulge, belly (out), swell, billow, balloon, bowl along, ripple, poleax(e), (cows): be in/on heat )
bond (= (con)federation, confederacy, league, alliance, union, association, society, pact, treaty)
boot (= boat)
boots (= bo(')s'n, bo(')sun, boatswain)
bore (= subjunctive of the verb “boren” = drill)
boring (= drilled hole)
born (= well, spring, fountain, source)
bot (= bone)
brake (= subjunctive of the verb “braken” = vomit, lay fallow, leave fallow, rest, let lie fallow
brand (= fire)
brave (declined form of “braaf” = good, honest, respectable, decent, innocent, well-behaved, obedient, goody-goody, virtuous, artless)
breed (= wide)
breeder (= kind of tulip)
breeks (= somebody who breaks a lot of stuff)
brief (= letter)
brink (= farmyard, village square)
brood (= bread)
broom (= bromium)
bruise (subjunctive of the verb “bruisen” = foam, effervesce, fizz, seethe, bubbel, brim)
brute (declined form of “bruut” = brute, beast, bully, ogre, brutal, rustic)
built (third person singular present tense of the verb “builen” = bolt, boult)
bumper (= only bumper of a vehicle)
bunder (= hectare)
burger (= citizen, civilian, plain clothes, civilian clothes / dress, civ(v)ies, commoner, commons, burgher)
dampen
dan
deed
deer
die
dies
dim
dinge
divers
does
door
driest
drop
dunk
eel
elder
elf
elk
en
ere
es
even
ever
flier
gal
gang
get
gift
gist
glad
gladden
gold (= past tense singular of verb "gelden"= count, weigh, apply, concern)
golden (= past tense plural of verb "gelden"= count, weigh, apply, concern)
golf
graver
graze
grit
gun
gust
haar
haft
hake
hale
hap
hate
heel
her
hip
hit
hits
hoe
honing (= honey)
hope
host
hot
hove
hun
jam
jut
keel (= throat, gules)
kin (= chin)
kind (= child)
kip (= hen)
knot (= knot, but also tuft, ball, hank, skein)
knots (= club, budgeon, mountain, fishing boat, whopper, crazy, loony, great, fantastic, marvellous)
lade
lag (= burden)
last
late
laten
latten
leek
leg
leger
legger
lei
lek
lessen
lest
let
lever
lid
lied
liege
lies
link
list (= trick, guile, ruse, scheme, wile, cunning, craft, deception)
listen (plural of Dutch list)
long (lung, lights)
look
loom
lost
love
lurk
lust
luxe
made
map
mars
mate
matter
matting
men
mere
met
min
molt
mom
more
morel
mort
most
mud
mug
mum
name
nap
natter (comparative degree of "nat" = wet)
node
nope
nor
nut
of
opening
pad
pal
pale
pander
pane
pare
past
peer
pelt
pent
pep
perk
pert
pest
pester
pet
peter
peters
pies
pink
pit
plan
plate
pod
poet
poets
pole
polis
pollen
pom
pommel
pomp
pond
pool
port
probate
pummel
put
rang
rape
rapt
rare
rare
ratten
red
reek
rent
rep
rest
ring
roe
rood
roof
rook
room
roost
root
rope
rotter
rust
rut
sent
sip
slang
sleep
slim
slope
slot
snit
spin
spoke
spoken
spot
spring
stage
stand
star
steeds
steel
steels
stele
stem
step
stern
stoke
stomp
stook
stool
store
stout
strand
stroke
talk
tang
teen
teer
telling
ten
tier
tig
til
tilt
tod
toe
toft
tony
toon
tor
torn
tot
trad
tramp
trap
twist
van
vang
veer
verglas
vroom
wad
wade
wage
wager
wake
want
war
ware
wars
wart
was
were
wet
wig
wild
wilder
wist
wit
witter
word
worst
wring
wrong
zag
zee
zing
zit
zoom

Some Dutch first names that are words in English:
Ad
Aries
Ben
Cola
Dirk
Eddy
Else
Harm
Jet
Job
Joke
Leen
Lien
Lies
Sander
Tine
Tiny
Tony
Will
Willie
Noes

[Edited at 2007-01-17 12:34]


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Paul Dixon  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 14:37
Portuguese to English
+ ...
False Friends PT/EN Jan 23, 2007

For PT/EN false friends, some references:

1. www.teclasap.com.br - click on "Falsos Cognatos" for a full list of false friends, then just click on one of the words to see why it is a false friend (in Portuguese)

2. Books:
a) CARVALHO, U.W. - Dicionário das Palavras que Enganam em Inglês (Dictionary of Misleading Words in English), Campus/Elsevier. 2004
b) IGREJA, J.R. - Falsos Cognatos: Looks can be Deceiving, DISAL, 2006
c) LANDO, I.M. - VocabuLando, DISAL, 2006

3. Course on False Friends at Disal in São Paulo, Brazil.
Information: + 55 11 3226-3100
Date: 20/04/2007 at 2 p.m.

I hope this helps.


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arum  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:37
German to English
A "new" false friend? Jan 26, 2007

Here's a false friend that has coincidentally appeared in two texts that I have reviewed recently: What is the English translation for the German "digitale"? The writer of the source text clearly meant "something that has been put into digital form", but to translate this as "digitalised" is incorrect. According to my dictionary, "digitalised" means "treated medically with digitalis (a plant of the genus Digitalis or foxglove)". The English should rather read "digitised"!

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Jari Vesterinen
Finland
Local time: 18:37
English to Finnish
+ ...
Search for info on false cognates Feb 2, 2007

The linguistic term for this is "false cognates". You may find more information from various linguistics websites about these.

Good luck!

Jari


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