Mobile menu

Phonetic transcription in chemistry
Thread poster: Cherepanov
Cherepanov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 22:07
Member (2005)
English to Russian
+ ...
Jan 26, 2007

I would appreciate it, if you advice me where to find phonetic transcriptions of special chemicals’ names. Such as, e.g., hexacyanoferrate, methyl xyloside, etc.

TIA

Dmitri


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mohammad Reza Razaghi  Identity Verified
Iran
Local time: 23:37
Member (2006)
English to Farsi (Persian)
+ ...
It depends on the target language Jan 26, 2007

The pronunciation of chemical compounds' names varies greatly depending on the target language. Normally, these names are "localized" in the scientific literatures of each country, so it would be helpful to consult a good technical (chemical) dictionary for the desired language pair to find out the appropriate phonetics.

In chemistry, these names consist of separate "roots" or "agents" (such as methyl) and you should normally find them separately in the dictionary.

If you are looking for English phonetics, please have a look at http://www.thefreedictionary.com, where you can find the pronunciations for a number of these chemical agents.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Cherepanov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 22:07
Member (2005)
English to Russian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
English names Jan 26, 2007

I am interested in their names in English. Even Webster, e.g., doesn't give the names I noted.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Attila Piróth  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 21:07
Member
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Bit-by-bit approach Jan 26, 2007

The longer the name, the less chance you have to find a complete pronunciation (unless they are very important, such as trinitrotoluene).
There are several good references on the web that you might find useful. One is http://www.answers.com, see for example
http://www.answers.com/topic/trinitrotoluene.
You can also write the name into google and add "pronunciation".
And of course, you can buy a pronunciation dictionary; I use the Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, written by J C Wells, and in many cases you will find it useful.
When you do not find a complete pronunciation, you have to reconstruct it from smaller building blocks. The drawback of this bit-by-bit approach is that it does not indicate where the main stress is in the word. But if you can find similar compounds that are well known - and for which you can look up the complete pronunciation - then you can probably apply a similar pattern.

Been there, done that, when adding pronunciation to the English words in the English-Hungarian dictionary of physics I am working on. (Antiferroelectricity, microelectromechanical, nongaussianity, spectropyrheliometry etc. - and of course proper names like Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox). But in chemistry there are much longer names - and there are many more of them.

Good luck
Attila


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mohammad Reza Razaghi  Identity Verified
Iran
Local time: 23:37
Member (2006)
English to Farsi (Persian)
+ ...
Just split the name into its constituent parts Jan 26, 2007

As I mentioned above, I think the only reliable way to find the right pronunciation would be splitting the name of the chemical substance into its agents (and of course you as a chemist can do it quite easily) and then looking up these separate parts in dictionaries, such as I cited before.

If you try it, I am sure you can find many helpful answers.

Good Luck!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Paul Merriam  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:07
Member (2008)
Russian to English
+ ...
IUPAC Jan 26, 2007

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has specific rules for determining chemical names and ensuring that these names are consistent from one language to another (not the same name, but consistent rules). If you run into these chemical names often, I recommend you talk to a reference librarian at a nearby university to determine whether they have books on these rules. (Most universities do. The librarian may also be able to help you determine how much these books cost, so you can decide whether to buy them rather than go to the university to consult their copies.)

I'm not sure I understand your question. If the issue is coming up with a set of Ukrainian letters so that a Ukrainian who is interested in chemistry but doesn't know English can pronounce the English name properly, I think Mr. Piroth's and Mr. Razaghi's suggestions are good.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Cherepanov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 22:07
Member (2005)
English to Russian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Jan 28, 2007

Thanks a lot for your suggestions and for helpful links.

Dmitri


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Phonetic transcription in chemistry

Advanced search






WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »
SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs