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Because of vs From expressing cause
Thread poster: Pedro Martínez
Pedro Martínez
Local time: 09:51
Spanish to English
Jun 18, 2007

will you explain what it is the difference when both indicate cause, reason?

e.g
first context:From/because of + noun (indicating cause, reason)

My eyes hurt from the smoke
My eyes hurt because of the smoke

Suddenly and violently broken open especially from internal pressure
Suddenly and violently broken open especially because of internal pressure

He was rushed to hospital but died from his injuries.
He was rushed to hospital but died because of injuries.


I have always used "because of " but "From" in this context
is new to me.

which one of them is formal or informal? I suppose that there is a subtle difference or are completely synonymous


Second context: from/for+ verb ( indicating cause, reason)
My eyes is red from watching tv
My eyes is red for watching t

He was sent to prison for falsifying the accounts.
He was sent to prison from falsifying the accounts
He is in prison from from falsifying the accounts

It seems that "From" is used in active sentences and for in
passive sentence for this second context. I am not sure of that!


I greatly appreciate your help


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xxxPRen  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:51
French to English
+ ...
Uh oh Jun 19, 2007

Well, if someone is going to fall on a sword....

Pedro, I notice that your profile says Spanish is your native language and yet you offer translations Spanish to English only.

You've made numerous mistakes in your message, mistakes a native English speaker would not make.

Are you asking these questions for the purposes of writing in/translating into English?


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:51
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
I agree, Paula Jun 19, 2007

PaulaRen wrote:

Well, if someone is going to fall on a sword....

Pedro, I notice that your profile says Spanish is your native language and yet you offer translations Spanish to English only.

You've made numerous mistakes in your message, mistakes a native English speaker would not make.

Are you asking these questions for the purposes of writing in/translating into English?





Yes, Pedro has made several English grammar mistakes in his examples and I'm not going to go through them all here (unless he'd like to contact me personally).
To complicate matters re choosing between "from" and "because of", it would probably be better to use neither in one of Pedro's examples and say "He was rushed to hospital but died OF his injuries".
Regards,
Jenny
jenny @ jennyforbes.wanadoo.co.uk


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Anne Koth  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 16:51
German to English
Learners' forum? Jun 19, 2007

Hello Pedro, I see on your profile it says "My name is Peter. I am an english student at present. I hope to improve my english here and also to help other people in spanish."

I'm not a big Proz user, but as far as I know, all of Proz is aimed at professional translators and interpreters. I don't know if there is a forum here for language learners who want to be translators ...?

To answer part of your question:

"He was sent to prison for falsifying the accounts." means he was sent there because of *something he did*.

They were annoyed with her for eating the cake.
= they were annoyed with her because she ate the cake.
(because of something she did)


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 16:51
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
English has very few fixed rules... Jun 19, 2007

We English natives do not have an "Académie Anglaise" or a National Language Council like the Danish one I occasionally refer to. I sometimes wish we did, but people do not take much notice of such bodies in practice! You have to use your ear... and even for natives, it's a very risky business.

I remember telling one of my clients once that in English Wednesday - and the other weekdays and months - are always written with a capital. (In Danish they are not, so he thought it looked odd...) But apart from that we don't have many fixed rules in English!

Even if you have got a 'native ear', things that sound fine to you may be 'forbidden' for others.

For some people it is a rule 'to never split an infinitive' And there was once a 'never start a sentence with 'And' or 'But' rule. Until I left school and the grammar teachers all retired, or whatever the story is.

In some of your examples I'd say both were acceptable, and others I would certainly never write myself. But that applies to a lot of things written by Shakespeare, Bernard Shaw, Keats and Graham Greene.... or probably any author you care to name.

Read a good grammar book - there are loads on the market. I have to admit I have learnt a lot of English from books written for advanced Danish students, discussing the differences between the two languages. They draw my attention to things I 'knew' but was not conscious of, so I still look through them now and then. Specialist areas like law and technology are a goldmine.

There must be Spanish-English equivalents.

I practise the 'only translate into your native language' principle. Danish is my second native language, but I know lots of Danes who translate better into Danish than I do, so I simply do not do it professionally. Conversely, I know several Danish translators who write really impressive English, so keep working at it. It's not impossible.

Best of luck!



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Hilde Granlund  Identity Verified
Norway
Local time: 16:51
English to Norwegian
+ ...
English grammar Jun 19, 2007

is something even the natives have trouble with, as Christine says (that probably applies to any other language as well...).
The day my Norwegian grammar is perfect, I might start thinking about translating into English

Lynne Truss has written a book that is both very funny and something to learn from:
http://eatsshootsandleaves.com/esl.html

At least I felt both amused and informed after reading it.


[Edited at 2007-06-19 12:10]


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GoodWords  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 09:51
Spanish to English
+ ...
"Practical English Usage" by Michael Swan Jun 19, 2007

I highly recommend this book for answering questions like Pedro's. It is directed at English learners*and there is hardly a question of this sort that it does not treat.

*Also very useful for helping native English speakers who are asked such questions by English learners.


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GoodWords  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 09:51
Spanish to English
+ ...
Forums for questions about English Jun 19, 2007

Here are some forums that would be good places to ask these and other questions about English usage.

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