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Seeing into the life of things. ..\"Tinter Abbey\" - W.Wordsworth
Thread poster: Aurora Humarán
Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 20:34
English to Spanish
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Nov 4, 2002




\"I was the Dreamer, they the Dream....\"







Ahhhh...school times...language III: a whole year devoted to Poetry.

A whole year to meet new friends: Chaucer, Lord Byron, Keats, Johnson, Dryden, Elliot, Dickinson, Tennyson...

And a month exclusively devoted to William the Great Wow...



As a constant \"seeker\" I have always accepted Wordsworth´s invitations to go deeper ...



Here he is today, lyrically inviting us again to question life.



We are always thinking about man´s relationship to the world of things and the world of people.

But how does man \"fit\" into the SCHEME OF EXISTENCE?

Are we caught up in nature?

Is man one with nature? Should he be one with nature?

Or is nature a mere stage for our \"play\"?

? Au







(some lines from \"Tintern Abbey\"...)



To them I may have owed another gift,

Of aspect more sublime; that blessed mood,

In which the burthen of the mystery,

In which the heavy and the weary weight

Of all this unintelligible world

Is lighten\'d: - that serene and blessed mood,

In which the affections gently lead us on,

Until, the breath of this corporeal frame,

And even the motion of our human blood

Almost suspended, we are laid asleep

In body, and become a living soul:

While with an eye made quiet by the power

Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,

We see into the life of things.





William Wordsworth



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MikeGarcia  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 00:34
English to Spanish
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FOR AUH... Nov 4, 2002

Did you ever wonder why William is an usual first name in english poetry? Chaucer, Wordsworth, Longfellow, and so.....

MGU
[addsig]


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anna_maria
Italy
Local time: 00:34
English to Italian
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Dear Aurora Nov 4, 2002

Dear Aurora

thank you for this very interesting question. It is most interesting to see how many other poets and artists have tried to answer to this problem, maybe not just *a* problem, but *the* Problem of a whole artistic and non-artistic life.

Listen what my beloved Shelley says in his \"Ode to the West Wind\" (l.43-56)

\"..

If I were a dead leaf thou mightest bear;

If I were a swift cloud to fly with thee;

A wave to pant beneath thy power, and share



The impulse of thy strength, only less free

Than thou, O uncontrollable!If even

I were as in my boyhood, and could be

The comrade of thy wanderings over Heaven,

As then, when to outstrip thy skiey speed

Scarce seemed a vision; I would ne\'er have striven



As thus with thee in prayer in my sore need.

Oh, lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud!

I fall upon the thorns of life!I bleed!



A heavy weight of hours has chained and bowed

One too like thee: tameless, and swift, and proud:..\"

Here there is the great painful sensation given by the realisation that the desire to be completely part of Nature is terribly difficult to achieve, if not mostly impossible; that is why a poet, or better a romantic poet, is almost like an hero....

Beautiful lines to think upon for hours and days, aren\'t they?

Cheers

Annamaria



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Domenica Grangiotti  Identity Verified
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The wisdom of children Nov 4, 2002

Ah, Wordsworth and schooldays ... an almost lethal mix!



My favourite was/ is the Immortality Ode:



Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting ...



meaning that



... trailing clouds of glory, do we come from God who is our home.



And the Child is the best philosopher, because he has not yet forgotten who his/her real Father is and where Truth lies.



It is a vision of life akin to the one expressed by Cat Stevens (do I dare to compare the two?) in Rhymes and Reasons, I believe.



... The children and the flowers are my sisters and my brothers. Their laughter and their loveliness could clear a cloudy day...



and the best way to remember that we belong to Nature is to create a \"brotherhood\" of men (or of human beings to take sexism out at least a bit).



Nice thoughts for a five minutes\' stop! Thanks





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Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 20:34
English to Spanish
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TOPIC STARTER
Cat Stevens Nov 4, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-11-04 14:36, domenica02 wrote:



It is a vision of life akin to the one expressed by Cat Stevens (do I dare to compare the two?) in Rhymes and Reasons, I believe.







Why not? Just another artist \"seeing into the real life of human beings\"....



Au

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Refugio
Local time: 15:34
Spanish to English
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WW Answers his own question Nov 4, 2002

We had, as a species, every opportunity to be a part of nature, says he. But we chose consciousness instead. And consciousness, by making us greedy for more than we need, took away that which we needed most.





The world is too much with us; late and soon,

Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;

Little we see in Nature that is ours;

We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!

This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon,

The winds that will be howling at all hours,

And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers,

For this, for everything, we are out of tune;

It moves us not.--Great God! I\'d rather be

A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;

So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,

Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;

Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;

Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn.


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Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 20:34
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W.W. = wise words Nov 4, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-11-04 15:54, refugio wrote:

And consciousness, by making us greedy for more than we need, took away that which we needed most.





Beautiful... Au

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Jacek Krankowski  Identity Verified
English to Polish
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Brotherhood of men Nov 4, 2002

While getting ready for my trip to NYC, I came across a poem by Archibald MacLeish (20th c.) of which here is the second half:



Land of the Free



(...)

The long harangues of the grass in the wind are our histories



We tell our freedom backward by the land

We tell our past by the gravestones and the apple trees



We wonder whether the great American dream

Was the singing of locusts out of the grass to the west

and the

Wets is behind us now:

The west wind\'s away from us:



We wonder if the liberty is done:

The dreaming is finished



We can\'t say



We aren\'t sure



Of if there\'s something different men can dream

Or if there\'s something different men can mean by

Liberty



Or if there\'s liberty a man can mean that\'s

Men: not land



We wonder



We don\'t know



We\'re asking


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Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 20:34
English to Spanish
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TOPIC STARTER
Another way of seeing nature.... Nov 5, 2002

If you wish to understand the fragrance of the rose, or the tenacity of the oak; if you are not satisfied until you know the secret paths by which the sunshine and the air achieve these wonders; if you wish to see the pattern which underlies one large field of human experience and human measurement, then take up chemistry....because you are in the wrong site









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Seeing into the life of things. ..\"Tinter Abbey\" - W.Wordsworth

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