which game localization tools does a translator use
Thread poster: xxxBrandis
xxxBrandis
Local time: 19:02
English to German
+ ...
Jul 1, 2005

Hi! Lately I have been getting a range of enquiries pertaining to Game Localization ps 2, Nintendo, Xbox etc., I had to realize that I needed to update my ability a bit and so... Rgds, Brandis

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Aleksandr Okunev
Local time: 20:02
English to Russian
What are file formats? Jul 1, 2005

Brandis wrote: ... ps 2, Nintendo, Xbox etc...

If these are plain text files, you can try my macro

http://www.accurussian.net/tagger.htm

it has been used for game localisation once, but you will have (wispering) to read its manual (donewhispering) and build your own script.

The macro can process any plaintext file and protect everything other than translated text from accidental damage or deletion.

HTH
Stay well
Alex
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~+=>


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tontoon
Turkey
Local time: 20:02
German to Turkish
+ ...
Hallo Jul 2, 2005

i hope its ok when i write in german.

Ich bin ein türkischer Spieleimporteur und versuche im türkischen Markt gerade Lokalisierung von Spielen einzuführen. Bei einer Spiellokalisierung brauchen Sie je nach Spiel immer verschiedene Tools. Manchmal reicht einfach wordpad oder MS Office, manchmal aber auch ganz andere Programme. Diese Tools sollten Ihnen eigentlich vom Auftraggeber zur Verfügung gestellt werden. Freundliche Grüsse.


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Roberta Anderson  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 19:02
Member (2001)
English to Italian
+ ...
pls use English in this forum Jul 4, 2005

tontoon wrote:

i hope its ok when i write in german.



Hi tontoon

Although Brandis understands your reply in German, pls use English in this forum, for the benefit of other readers/contributors.

Thanks!
Roberta


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Mirella Soffio  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 19:02
Member (2002)
English to Italian
+ ...
Anything goes... Jul 4, 2005

Brandis wrote:

Hi! Lately I have been getting a range of enquiries pertaining to Game Localization ps 2, Nintendo, Xbox etc., I had to realize that I needed to update my ability a bit and so... Rgds, Brandis


Hi Brandis

I don't know if you've ever translated a game, but there are a few things worth pointing out - sorry if I am stating the obvious, but I thought that maybe the info could benefit younger and less experienced translators.
A game is made out of different parts; you have the software files (ingame texts and game interface), the "printed" materials (readme, manuals, EULAs... - usually .txt, .doc, .rc or .htm files) and the audio files (dialogues and/or subtitles - usually .xls files). Obviously, each part requires a different set of skills, which means that the translator has to be familiar with software localization, platform glossaries (a "button" on the PlayStation is not the same as a "button" on an Xbox) and whatever the theme of the game calls for: sports jargon, ancient history, casinos, military acronyms, police slang...
The translation of the audio files is the most challenging and rewarding part of the job; translating the script of a game is like translating the script of a movie, in that you have time constraints (if the text has to be dubbed) or character constraints (it the translation is going to be used for captions), different characters speaking, lots of slang and lots of culture-specific humour that you need to adapt and localize (references to movies, celebrities, literay works, TV shows that might or might not be known outside the source language country). Not everything is translated all the time; when the publisher has a tight budget, he only translates the printed materials (manuals and the like); for Europe, most games are localized in the so-called FIGS languages (French, Italian, German and Spanish); bigger productions add Nordic languages to the mix. Potential best-sellers get the VIP treatment, meaning that also the s/w and the audio files are translated.
The localization process usually starts when the developers are still working on the game; this means that often you start the translation knowing precious little about the game; if you're lucky, you can have some artwork and a sketchy plot, but mostly you have to rely on the developers to solve your doubts ("Is the "box" in line 456 a cardboard box?", "Is Xerg a male or a female character?".... ).
After the game has been localized, it undergoes a couple of testing phases, one to pick up linguistic problems, and the other to smooth out technical issues; at this phase someone actually gets to *play* the game to see what happens! The testing is often done /chez /the publisher, which means that sometimes you get to travel to Japan or Germany or the USA to work side by side with the developers (sadly, I have been offered this kind of jobs only four times, when my son was too young to be left home alone with a nanny.... ).
Rates are usually on the low side, at least for European languages, and there are a lot of wannabe translators who think "hey, it's only a game, no big deal, I can handle that" - which explains the abundance of ridiculous mistakes the reviewers are so eager to point their fingers at. The workload tends to be discontinuous, with summer being the most hectic period of the year (all publishers want to have their games out in time for Christmas!). In the last couple of years I have had more work than I could handle, but in the past February, March and April used to be quite sluggish.
CAT tools are widely used and discounts for repetitions expected; sometimes you have to translate three versions of the same manual which are identical except for the platform-specific terminology, or a minor update, or a couple of strings that weren't in the first batch of files - in these cases, you only get paid for "new" words. CAT tools and glossaries are also used for consistency's sake; this is particularly useful when you have a pool of translators working on the same project, and you need to be sure that they are all using the same terminology; or when you are working on a franchise, where each new title has to be consistent with its predecessors.
Since many CAT tools allow the exchange of TMs (in text format), you can usually choose the one you feel more at ease with, except when the client wants you to use a particular tool (SDLX, for instance).
I hope this helps

Mirella


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philippe juton
English
Game Localization Content Management Tool Apr 20, 2006

Hello, I'm new to this forum. I am responsible for localization at BVG. I'd like to know if anybody had experience working for content management tool for their game localization projects. Thanks for letting me know if it is the case. Philippe

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xxxBrandis
Local time: 19:02
English to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
what has BVG anything to do with game localization Apr 21, 2006

philippe juton wrote:

Hello, I'm new to this forum. I am responsible for localization at BVG. I'd like to know if anybody had experience working for content management tool for their game localization projects. Thanks for letting me know if it is the case. Philippe
can you please tell us. I have worked for BVG in the context of Siemens installations for many years. Few of these older projects are still going. Locate yourself there please, What do you do,what games? if necessary contact me on skype. Best Brandis

p.s I took it for Berliner Verkehrsbetriebe in Berlin. But I don´t understand content management for Games?? enlighten please.

[Edited at 2006-04-21 19:38]


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Alain Dellepiane  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 02:02
English to Italian
BVG: Buena Vista Games Apr 21, 2006

I assume he refers to Buena Vista Games (http://buenavistagames.go.com/home.html) which is deeply involved with games localization.

Unfortunately I've never used such tools in my career: there were talks of getting Alienbrain at some point, but license fee were deemed to high.

[Edited at 2006-04-21 19:00]


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Professional localization tool Apr 8, 2013

If this post will still be read by members, I want to contribute with something helpful. This is a very nice localization online software I have work with recently with a translation project: https://poeditor.com/. It has a lot of features that help all the contributors finish their work faster. They can help each other by setting a reference language to help them translate. Give it a try, it will work super for games.

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