Video game localisation: is there a market? What programmes are used? ...
Thread poster: Noemi Carrera

Noemi Carrera  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:47
Member (2003)
English to Spanish
Feb 24, 2003

Dear colleagues,



Could you please tell me about your experience in this field? What kind of programmes are used for translating video games? Which is the usual file format? Which are the difficulties you find when translating video games? Is there a market for video game localisation at present?



Thank you very much for your input.


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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:47
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Beautiful market, I've heard Feb 25, 2003

I don\'t work it - yet (hoping to. I\'m interested in that I specialise in computer graphics and art-related architecture/applications, and this is where the action is). However, I have a friend who has come to specialise in the field on the strength of a nine-year-old son\'s passionate involvement with computer games, and yes, the two of them translate together, with the boy doing the \"testing\". But this is because my friend insists on getting the software itself before starting (otherwise, instructions can be interpreted out of context).





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Renassans LS
Local time: 22:47
German to Swedish
+ ...
I like it... Feb 25, 2003

I have some experience of video game localization, and I have to say it\'s one of my favorites areas to work in.



This kind of jobs can be really relaxing and fun after translating more heavy technical subject matter. In my experience it actually pays quite well too (for me, perhaps mainly since I do it for a direct client).



Unfortunately, only very few games are localized for the Swedish market, but the Spanish market should provide more opportunities. I don\'t really know it, but at least in Germany, virtually all video games are localized. I reckon it\'s the same in Spain.



My advice is to write a selling letter (stating the necessary experience) and send it to some Spanish branches of international game developers, and hope for the best.



Best regards



Jonas


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RosaT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:47
English to Spanish
+ ...
There sure is Apr 11, 2003

For me, it is one of the nicest areas I work on, but do not expect fun work at all times. It can be really tough and sometimes the client is not prepared to offer everything you really need to do a proper translation, as was pointed out before - lack of context in many, many instances, so testing is really crucial.



Working directly for the developers must be just fantastic as far as rates are concerned, but most big game developers work through big localization vendors.



Good luck!


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Renassans LS
Local time: 22:47
German to Swedish
+ ...
That's probably right May 6, 2003

It\'s probably true that many developers work through localization companies, but the really big game developers often have local branches responsible for the respective market.



A good idea is to contact some of these branches and emphasize the advantages you as a freelancer offer in comparison to big agencies. You mentioned the reoccuring need for clarifications on context on this kind of jobs. Thus, it\'s an idea to stress, in your initial marketing contact, how much smoother the contact with a freelancer is, instead of going through an agency, in the communication of issues about context and so on.



Best regards,



Jonas


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xxxBrandis
Local time: 22:47
English to German
+ ...
Game localization Nov 25, 2003

This is a very tedious work. It requires that the translator gets into the source codes to change the language interface or even the audio titles. In recent times SDLX ( Game localization - tools) are most popular. Additionally you may need video editing & Subtitling module aswell. The rest of the work is how precisely you go about it. Worth the experience.
Bandis


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Jalapeno
Local time: 22:47
English to German
Two points... Dec 5, 2003

First of all:

http://www.dl-multimedia.com/

They are based in Madrid. Seems to be a large company, judging from their website. Maybe you should just ask them if they need translators.

Second of all


brandis wrote:

This is a very tedious work. It requires that the translator gets into the source codes to change the language interface or even the audio titles. In recent times SDLX ( Game localization - tools) are most popular. Additionally you may need video editing & Subtitling module aswell. The rest of the work is how precisely you go about it. Worth the experience.
Bandis


I disagree. I\'ve been doing quite a lot of video game localization over the past two years. And not once did I have to change any source code. I also never needed video editing or subtitling modules. I don\'t do my work for the final costumer, i.e. the publisher of the games, but for a German company that is specialized on localizing computer and video games. It\'s fun, it\'s relaxing, it\'s not too badly paid. The thing with localizing games is that the language is usually very general. You don\'t have to stick to the original, your translation should just sound good. Wich means that you have to be creative, and that is something you don\'t find too often in translating.



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xxxBrandis
Local time: 22:47
English to German
+ ...
Thank you Jan 5, 2004

Jalapeno wrote:

First of all:

http://www.dl-multimedia.com/

They are based in Madrid. Seems to be a large company, judging from their website. Maybe you should just ask them if they need translators.

Second of all


brandis wrote:

This is a very tedious work. It requires that the translator gets into the source codes to change the language interface or even the audio titles. In recent times SDLX ( Game localization - tools) are most popular. Additionally you may need video editing & Subtitling module aswell. The rest of the work is how precisely you go about it. Worth the experience.
Bandis


I disagree. I've been doing quite a lot of video game localization over the past two years. And not once did I have to change any source code. I also never needed video editing or subtitling modules. I don't do my work for the final costumer, i.e. the publisher of the games, but for a German company that is specialized on localizing computer and video games. It's fun, it's relaxing, it's not too badly paid. The thing with localizing games is that the language is usually very general. You don't have to stick to the original, your translation should just sound good. Wich means that you have to be creative, and that is something you don't find too often in translating.

Dear all,
thank you very much, I had honestly tried. But they seem to have their own specialists, nevertheless, they had inform to take me into their Database and revert as and when the necessity comes up. Wish me luck. By the way these are a group of companies working together like a conglomerate.
Gruss
Brandis


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