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For legal translators specifically: litigation demand up?
Thread poster: Ken Fagan
Ken Fagan  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:21
French to English
Feb 8, 2009

I'd like to hear from legal translators specifically: have you seen an increase in demand for litigation/arbitration docs over the past few months?

Thanks


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:21
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Yes Feb 8, 2009

Yes, Ken, I've had masses of jurisprudence about international arbitration, and some litigation stuff, but mostly case law stuff, reports of discussions between juristes, etc.
Best wishes,
Jenny


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Ken Fagan  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:21
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
from one or several clients? Feb 8, 2009

Thanks, Jenny:-)

From one or several clients?


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:21
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
See below Feb 8, 2009

Ken Fagan wrote:

Thanks, Jenny:-)

From one or several clients?


All the arbitration stuff was from one client, the litigation stuff from a couple of others. Have you noticed a marked increase in this kind of job, then?
Best wishes,
Jenny


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Ken Fagan  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:21
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
No, I haven't Feb 8, 2009

No, so far I haven't seen an increase in litigation/arbitration jobs.

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Andrea Kowalenko  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:21
Member (2006)
Spanish to German
+ ...
Not really Feb 8, 2009

I have not seen an increase either. But maybe this is all my fault.

I recently had inquiries from a translation agency in Spain asking for legal translation (with supposedly regular workloads to come) at 0.05 € per word, but I am just not willing to work at these rates. Not to mention a six (!) page test translation from a badly scanned PDF (not a job in disguise though, it was an old document, but anyway ...).

There also might be a delay due to slow working courts (at least here in Spain), and I think it is reasonable to expect that this type of translation work will increase over the next months.


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Kaiya J. Diannen  Identity Verified
Australia
Member (2008)
German to English
Not from my usual sources Feb 8, 2009

I work with a few select agencies from whom I seem to get most of my litigation assignments, and they have experienced relative quiet over the past 3 months or so.

One of those agencies said that even regular clients have recently been looking for price breaks, although I don't know if that related specifically to its legal clients.

I had one rather large project back in November concerning real estate loans, which I had guessed might have something to do with the 'bad loans' crisis. From from the pieces I was working on, however, which contained information that was quite old, it was impossible to say for sure. Since that time I haven't seen anything else come in related to that "case".


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Anil Gidwani  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 12:51
German to English
+ ...
Not yet Feb 8, 2009

Not really, not yet anyway.

Surprisingly, there was a news report in the New York Times that lawyers' offices, at least in the US, are trying to cut costs in this slowdown, so it remains to be seen if that translates into fewer litigation-related assignments as well. However, the current environment should lead to more litigation and not less, one would think.


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Lindsay Sabadosa  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 03:21
Member (2004)
Italian to English
+ ...
Yes Feb 8, 2009

Since October maybe. I've been working on two large cases in particular. All from the same client.

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Kaiya J. Diannen  Identity Verified
Australia
Member (2008)
German to English
A bit of logic Feb 9, 2009

Would it be safe to say that a lot of legal translators stay with a particular case as it progresses (i.e. the client seeks out the same translator(s) who has/have already worked on the material because of their familiarity, etc.)?

This would mean, by default, that if a translator has already been involved with a case, that translator is going to be called upon to continue with it - and as the need for translated documents waxes and wanes, the translator's workload will increase and decrease in the same way.

This in turn would mean that the translator's workload wouldn't necessarily be affected by the general circumstances in the economic environment...

And litigation can often become drawn out over quite long periods of time, at least in my experience. What that might imply is that any increases or decreases due to new suits/bankruptcies/reorganizations filed might not really be felt for a while...

Or do you believe this is not the case?


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