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Royalties for translator
Thread poster: Marcelle Bethancourt

Marcelle Bethancourt  Identity Verified
Panama
Local time: 13:58
Spanish to French
+ ...
Mar 28, 2009

I have heard that when our translations are published or posted on the web (web page), we are entitled to royalties. Is it correct? What percentage can we ask for? I am intending to translate webpages.

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Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:58
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Work for hire - no royalties Mar 28, 2009

Most translation work is done as "work for hire", in which case the translator has no intellectual property rights to the product.


The only case I know where royalties are possible is book translations, based on specific agreements with the author and/or the publisher. But I have never heard of getting royalties for website translations.


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ahmadwadan.com  Identity Verified
Kuwait
Local time: 21:58
English to Arabic
+ ...
Exactly Mar 29, 2009

Katalin Horvath McClure wrote:

Most translation work is done as "work for hire", in which case the translator has no intellectual property rights to the product.


The only case I know where royalties are possible is book translations, based on specific agreements with the author and/or the publisher. But I have never heard of getting royalties for website translations.


PBUY,

Exactly, unless you are going to translate a book that is going to be published. If you do not set your terms before handling such cases then your work shall be deemed to "work for hire" rule.

Regards
Ahmed


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Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:58
Spanish to English
+ ...
Varies by country Mar 29, 2009

Katalin Horvath McClure wrote:

Most translation work is done as "work for hire", in which case the translator has no intellectual property rights to the product.



The "work for hire" concept is enshrined in U.S. law but is not universal. It is my understanding that in Spain, for example, there are certain inherent intellectual property rights that a translator cannot sign away. This may be true in some other countries as well.

Where it gets sticky is if the translator is in one country and the client in another. And the international nature of the Internet complicates things further.

However, I'm not a lawyer or an expert on law. It's best to consult an intellectual property lawyer on topics like this.

[Edited at 2009-03-29 15:34 GMT]


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