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Thread poster: Mariam Merabishvili
Best Schengen Country to live in, based on Taxes + Healthcare
Mariam Merabishvili  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:58
English to Georgian
+ ...
Aug 8, 2011

I am making decent money translating and I do not got any ties to my home country (Georgia). What is the best place to live (in the Schengen region) when I am only looking at tax expenses and health care expenses? Gibraltar? Luxembourg? Monaco? I was wondering what other people think about this? And maybe people could let me know some about how the taxes work in their home country?

At the moment I am thinking about the U.K. because of the 70-80k VAT threshold, with 50k euro per year you pay about 30%~?

[Edited at 2011-08-08 20:39 GMT]


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Patrick.D
Local time: 07:58
Russian to English
Not in the UK. Aug 8, 2011

Neither the United Kingdom nor the Republic of Ireland are signatories of the Schengen agreement.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Agreement


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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
No way Aug 8, 2011


MariamV wrote:

I am making decent money translating and I do not got any ties to my home country (Georgia). What is the best place to live (in the Schengen region) when I am only looking at tax expenses and health care expenses? Gibraltar? Luxembourg? Monaco? I was wondering what other people think about this? And maybe people could let me know some about how the taxes work in their home country?

At the moment I am thinking about the U.K. because of the 70-80k VAT threshold, with 50k euro per year you pay about 30%~?

[Edited at 2011-08-08 20:39 GMT]


You're asking for the impossible: a country where the taxes are low and the quality of healthcare is high. That doesn't compute.

And you can't work in the UK anyway, because you are not an EU citizen. I suggest you stay where you are and continue to make that "decent money" in Georgia.

Anyway as Patrick says, the UK is not a signatory to the Schengen Agreement.

In any case I don't think there's much demand for English to Georgian translation work in London. Where you are, in Georgia, obviously there's a lot.

[Edited at 2011-08-08 21:19 GMT]


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SamuelVisscher  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 07:58
Member (2011)
English to Dutch
+ ...
Married to an EU citizen Aug 8, 2011

Ah my apologies,

I am married to a EU citizen so I can freely reside in the Schengen region AND the UK. And just to clarify; I mean the cost of taxes and the cost of healthcare combined. So for example if the health care costs 200 euro per months and the income tax is 20% above 20k, that's better than 150 euro with 30% above 20k.

And currently I am not living in Georgia but in Belgium, so most my work is internet-based.

Edit: posted on my husband's account accidentally, he's also a translator.



[Edited at 2011-08-08 23:06 GMT]


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Post removed: This post was hidden by a moderator or staff member for the following reason: Deleted by poster
Yаnа Dеni  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 02:58
French to Russian
+ ...
... Aug 9, 2011

They say that Luxembourg is the best for the retirement, but I found it somehow boring for living.

If I could choose and if I earned decent money by freelance translations, I'd prefer some Greek island, no matter what happens to the Greek economy.


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 08:58
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
What's wrong with Georgia? Aug 9, 2011

As far as I know Georgia is one of the cheapest countries to live in, at least for tourists. Physician salaries probably low. Is taxing so bad?
Perhaps you could tell us more about Georgia?
Estonia would be my suggestion. In any case you'll need a private health insurance. The prices can be found on the net.


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Gillian Searl  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:58
Member (2004)
German to English
Still not the UK! Aug 9, 2011

I pay double the taxes compared with Germany. I'd much rather pay lower taxes in Germany and pay for health care than pay higher taxes in the UK, get supposedly free health care which although it has improved recently is now frankly getting worse. So I pay for private health care here too - although I'm far from convinced that the £70 a month I pay is worth it. If you want decent health care - Germany!

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GerSi  Identity Verified
Slovenia
Local time: 07:58
Member (2010)
German to Slovenian
+ ...
Not Slovenia Aug 9, 2011

Hi,

in Slovenia the minimum for self-employed individuals is 225 EUR.

(includes also social security contributions and all mandatory contributions and is applicable if you earn 7.411 EUR yearly or less).

An additional healthcare insurance is highly recommended and it costs 24,62 - 26,49 EUR per month, depending on which insurance company you choose.

You can see more about taxes in Slovenia and some other countries here http://www.worldwide-tax.com/slovenia/slovenia_tax.asp


Just for comparison:
if your yearly income is 7.411 EUR, the income tax rate is 16%,
with 14,822 EUR and over, the income tax rate is 41%.


[Edited at 2011-08-09 07:11 GMT]


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Krzysztof Kajetanowicz  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 07:58
English to Polish
+ ...
new EU members Aug 9, 2011

If you want lower healthcare prices and lower taxes, it's a no-brainer: the new members (EU-12) tend to have both lower taxes and cheaper healthcare. UK residents even fly themselves in to visit Polish dentists, and people living in East Germany very often travel over the border.

However, you also want to consider:

- infrastructure! are you willing to spend 6 hours on the train if you're going to travel 360 km? New EU members vary wildly in this respect - railways, roads, electricity grid - not to mention that the old ones tend to be in a better situation;
- other prices. You can pay EUR 1000 or EUR 400 in rent, same goes for other expenses. Since you already live in Europe, I'm a little surprised you've chosen to ignore this;
- whether or not you're actually be paying for healthcare, depending on where you live;
- what happens in 5 years; in Poland, we'll likely have energy blackouts and electricity will cost a fortune (because of the decaying infrastructure and EU policies, according to which some resources are 'right' and some are 'wrong'; in France, where electricity is 90% nuclear-generated, you're free from such worries.

In terms of recommendations, a wild guess would be the Czech Republic, due to the tax-price-infrastructure combo and the fact that unlike Slovakia they haven't adopted the euro (which makes them less vulnerable to macroeconomic shocks).

[Edited at 2011-08-09 07:38 GMT]

[Edited at 2011-08-09 07:40 GMT]


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Anja Weggel  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:58
Member (2007)
English to German
difficult Aug 9, 2011

This is a really difficult questions because so much depends on your personal preferences. Living is not only a question of money but also of your own preferences. So aside from the question of money you need to answer the question of "what do you like" in so many respects?
Do you like living near the sea or in the mountain? Do you want to live in a big city or in the countryside? Do you need infrastructure or are you happy living remotely somewhere in the countryside? Do you want access to culture & language, i.e. which languages do you know and which languages are you willing to learn?
And coming back to the money questions... are you willing to live in a country where things may be cheap, but quality is too? Although this may not be symmetric (or fair), but in general, higher costs also mean higher quality of life.
So I find it rather difficult to give you some advice here. I can certainly recommend Austria oder Germany in terms of quality of life, they are however not the cheapest countries, compared to Scandinavia or Switzerland it is however still ok. If you want to go cheap you probably have to look East but then things like infrastructure and quality might suffer.


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Mariam Merabishvili  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:58
English to Georgian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
First of all thank you for all the serious answers Aug 9, 2011

Thank you all, I think that when I have some more free time I will try to make a short summary of my findings on this subject!

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Sergei Tumanov  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:58
English to Russian
+ ...
Estonia Aug 9, 2011

Estonia

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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:58
Flemish to English
+ ...
Switzerland. Aug 9, 2011

Switzerland is also a part of the Schengen area. For E.U.-citizens, it is not so difficult to get a work-permit of a year. If you live on the French part of the border and work in Switzerland, you can save. Low taxes in Switzerland and good healthcare. However, you should consult one of the many mutuelles/tax-advisors on the French side of the border. Don't know whether in Geneva, you will find a lot of work with Georgian.

[Edited at 2011-08-09 16:38 GMT]


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MariusV  Identity Verified
Lithuania
Local time: 08:58
English to Lithuanian
+ ...
Georgia is nice and cheap, but ... Aug 9, 2011


Heinrich Pesch wrote:

As far as I know Georgia is one of the cheapest countries to live in, at least for tourists. Physician salaries probably low. Is taxing so bad?
Perhaps you could tell us more about Georgia?
Estonia would be my suggestion. In any case you'll need a private health insurance. The prices can be found on the net.


Georgia is nice and cheap, but I think it is a big risk to go there. On the basis on what happened in 2008 (Russian-Georgian war, or, more exactly - that brutal Russian invasion), there is still a huge tension in that Caucasian region. And I think Russians can provoke Georgia any time to get involved into some new crisis.

All in all, I think that it is best to live somewhere OUTSIDE the EU. And hope that this big collective farm called "European Union" (a huge mess) will collapse soon (just like the Soviet Union collapsed).


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Best Schengen Country to live in, based on Taxes + Healthcare







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