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Rates for Translation and DTP in Quark express
Thread poster: Eloïse Notet

Eloïse Notet  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 18:33
Member (2005)
German to French
+ ...
Dec 29, 2005

Hello everybody!

I have been asked by a client about my rates for translation and DTP in Quark Express, but I have no idea of how it should be rated. I have not worked with the software yet, and I don't know if the rates are really different from the "common" ones.

Thanks for your responses!


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Chiara_M  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:33
French to Italian
+ ...
My experience Dec 29, 2005

Hi Eloisen,
I've translated on Quark twice in my life. In both cases I've applied my average rate for translations and I charged extra for the DTP work (hourly rates).

Chiara

[Edited at 2005-12-29 12:40]


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Fernando Toledo  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 18:33
Member (2005)
German to Spanish
Sorry this is not professional Dec 29, 2005

Eloisen wrote:

Hello everybody!

...I have no idea of how it should be rated. I have not worked with the software yet, ...

Thanks for your responses!


To offer your services for a work that you do not know how to do is irresponsible and you are breaking the mark, there is a lot of people that have study DTP, in Spanish we say for that "competencia desleal"

Wish you a good 2006, and a lot of work as translator

Toledo


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Eloïse Notet  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 18:33
Member (2005)
German to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Only a question! Dec 29, 2005

hello!

Thanks Chiara for your response.

Toledo: I did not propose my services for DTP, but as a translator and I don't believe that I break the market. On the contrary! I fight every day with the agencies I am working with, which propose rates that are much too low for the long years of Studies at the university...
The problem you mention is the same in the translation field: what is the percentage of people who work as a translator and who are graduated?..
And for Quark: there are agencies that require the software. That's the reason why I wanted to inform myself about it and its use..

I wish you a happy new year too!

Eloïse


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Fred Neild  Identity Verified
English to Spanish
+ ...
Be careful Dec 29, 2005

I would not take the job unless it was one of my clients. I have already worked a lot with most DTP softwares (not translating but actually as a designer) and I know things can get rough, and my focus is now on translation. I usually tell my clients I can carry out the translation and they should then send the file to a DTP pro. Usually, they are just looking for a cost reduction and I am not interested in working for free.

If I were to take the job (I never say never again) I guess I would charge an additional 20%-50% depending on the complexity of the file. Be aware, some jobs may be more involved with DTP than with translating. Since you have no experience it will be difficult for you to tell the difference.

I think you are being a bit unprofessional and you may get in a mess that it is not worth it.

Good luck!


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Eloïse Notet  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 18:33
Member (2005)
German to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks! Dec 29, 2005

Hi, thanks for your information.

I am not unprofessional, since I did not accept anything!! My scope was only to collect information about it..and I won't begin tomorrow with dtp ..

Best regards


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Jaroslav Tomiczek  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:33
Member (2005)
English to Czech
Try it Dec 30, 2005

Just play a little bit with Quark Express, process a dummy file and you will see, what skills you need to make the file look well.
Then decide if you want to get into DTP business.
Jaro


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:33
English to Portuguese
+ ...
It's a different kind of work Jan 6, 2006

For me, it's difficult to set apart translation from DTP, as I have been doing both simultaneously since day one of my professional translating life. Back in 1973, I was translating technical manuals, getting them neatly typed, remaking and/or adapting drawings and photographs, and gluing everything onto sheets of paper for reproduction.

For promotional literature, everything was prepared for an art studio to make a "paste-up" and then shoot photoliths for printing. In this process, the borderline between translation and graphic arts was very clear.

The computer age changed all that. What was previously the work of translators in one place, draftsmen and paste-up artists in another, and external vendors (such as photo-typesetting, photoliths, etc.) elsewhere, COULD be done by just one person within one single computer on a desk top, hence DeskTop Publishing.

The point is that it COULD, but not necessarily SHOULD. As I had been doing the whole job manually, it was natural for me to adopt PageMaker as soon as it became popular for the PC, in the mid-80s.

It's a matter of paradigms. Word processing software stems from the typewriter paradigm. Microsoft Word is no more than a typewriter with all the countless resources computer technology was able to add to it. PageMaker, the first DTP program still alive, follows precisely the paste-up studio paradigm. The other DTP programs have paradigms of their own, most of them derived from everyday computer practices.

It is definitely possible to get DTP-like results from a modern word processing program. If the publication is simple, it will look all right, and shouldn't be too difficult to make. If it is rather complex and/or has to look just GREAT, DTP will be required.

The big question is whether a translator should do the DTP him/herself. With some considerable effort, a neophyte to DTP might be able to do as much as they can get out of their word processor. It's like switching from driving a car to a Bobcat. However to do really good DTP work it takes considerable experience. Should a translator develop the basic knowledge of some other language they might have to reach translating level? This is a very personal decision.

So what's the alternative? Well, a translator can tell the client that they only translate, that the DTP work will have to be outsourced somewhere else. Or the translator can offer to outsource DTP on their own, hire a DTP artist, and bundle the cost in the package.

The latter option opens very interesting possibilities. Let's take a frequent example, a corporate newsletter or institutional magazine to be published in several languages. Its original will probably be available as a file compatible with one of the most common DTP programs. By early arrangement with the selected DTP artist, the translator can have the latter export all the text therein to a convenient file format for their favorite CAT tool. No need to fumble with unknown software to get it out. No need for scanning and OCR from hardcopy.

The key in the translator-DTPer interface is to identify text correspondence. One solution is "marking". The translator will have to make a copy of the original, circle each block of text, number (or letter) each, and then properly identify its corresponding translation. Otherwise, how will the DTPer know what goes where? A time-saving alternative is to use a bilingual DTP-er. It doesn't have to be a translator between these languages. For instance, I only translate ENPT, but I know enough IT-ES-FR to do DTP between any two of these five languages without markings. If you can find a bilingual DTPer for your pair, it will spare you a lot of effort.

Another time-saver is formatting, though it depends on both the WP and DTP programs used. Of course I can import DOC or RTF files to PageMaker, but my first action is usually to remove all formatting, and redo it "the PM way". So I prefer clean TXT, but your mileage may vary. Check first with your DTPer.

There are some other considerations for a translator outsourcing DTP work. First, a DTP artist is not necessarily proficient in all such software; they might be specialized in one, or just a few of them. Second, if the client's need is just a PDF file, it won't make much difference which software was used to create it. And finally, if the DTPer will not be in direct communication with the final client, the translator will have to act as a bridge for issues like "what font is this and where can it be found?", "do you have figure X at 300 dpi?", etc.

Finally, if you - translator - have enough demand for a certain type of DTP service to prompt your investing your time and money in it, first check if the required software is "popular" enough to justify doing so.

Good luck!

Jose Henrique Lamensdorf
Sao Paulo, SP - Brazil
http://jh.lamensdorf.com.br/local


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