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We have to accept the low rates
Thread poster: SWEDISH-TRANSLATION.com - your Swedish translation partner
SWEDISH-TRANSLATION.com - your Swedish translation partner
Local time: 05:44
Swedish to English
+ ...
Nov 28, 2001

I think that we have to accept that people in some countries bid very low. Think about it. If you want to have a translation job done and a qualified translator in Thailand will do the job for a third of normal price, wouldn\'t you give the job to that translator? I would.



We have to accept the low rates. That\'s what globalization has brought to us. But you\'ll also get what you pay for. Many translators with low rates maybe ain\'t qualified, as well as people that have high rates also maybe not always are that qualified.



So, to all translators whining about the low rates - accept the trend or get another job.


[addsig]


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Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 23:44
German to English
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Caveat! Nov 28, 2001

Depends: if you are talking about language pairs that include Thai, that may be fine. But never, never, never give a translation such as, for example, English to Spanish to a Thai agency or translator (or agencies from other countries outside the West).



As for these purely Western language pairs, Thailand, for example, does not have any \"qualified translators\" as you put it. Unless you want a translation into \"Thainglish\" - well, if that\'s what you want, then you\'ll certainly get your 2 cents\' worth



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jccantrell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 20:44
Member (2005)
German to English
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Not so sure about lumping all agencies together Nov 28, 2001

Globalization has also brought us the ability of working WHEREVER we wish. For instance, ProZ member SabineT is located in India and does German and English. So, if she works with an Indian agency, would you automatically exclude them from consideration of English into German? I would not.



Of course, I would try to do my homework and ensure that I was getting a quality product from a native speaker. Requesting work samples from the translator who is to do the work should do the trick. This is no guarantee, but in the end, you are dealing in

business relationships, so geography should

play a minor role.


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lcmolinari  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 23:44
Member
French to English
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Qualified translators often move around Nov 28, 2001

You wouldn\'t think a client would go looking in Thailand for a Spanish-English agency, but what if I\'m a very qualified, native-English-speaking translator who recently moved to Thailand, or that I spend the winter months there? Does that mean no one will take me seriously anymore as a Sp-En translator?

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SWEDISH-TRANSLATION.com - your Swedish translation partner
Local time: 05:44
Swedish to English
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TOPIC STARTER
Not true WGP Trans Nov 28, 2001

I wrote \"Qualified translator\". There are many qualified translators in all countries in the world.



I you moved to let\'s say Thailand, wouldn\'t you consider yourself qualified if you took a job on a Thai translation agency, translating your language pairs? And even if you\'re very qualified, you can afford to lower your price because it\'s a lot cheaper to live there than in many other countries.





_________________



[ This Message was edited by: on 2001-11-28 13:45 ]


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Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 23:44
German to English
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I beg to differ Nov 28, 2001

If you are a highly trained and qualified translator, you would not normally move there, I think. And even if you did, you would still charge your usual rates.



Just my personal opinion - let\'s agree to disagree


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Hans-Henning Judek  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:44
German to English
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Bali would not be bad.... Nov 28, 2001

Werner, I think qualification has nothing to do with geography. I personally know a highly qualified French translator, who was living here in Japan, but moved to the Phillipines, because he did not like the city and working all day long. So he does his translation over the Internet for 1/3rd of the price now, but has - for his personal preferences - a much higher standard of living. Working half of the day and surfing the rest.



I usually do test translations, if it obviously IS a test (e.g. parts from various sectors of a larger document) and up to 100~150 words at most. Otherwise I just tell them that I can provide references.



Anyway, my prediction is that if prices go down as they are at the moment, we will all meet in a bamboo hut at the beaches of Bali - of course with a broadband connection


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Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 23:44
German to English
+ ...
And then we'll have a great bamboo party! Nov 28, 2001

Looking forward to it, Hans



But don\'t worry about the broadband connection: we\'ll just live off the land



Seriously, I am aware of such exceptions, but the general rule is just as I said: if you need a translation from English to French, hand it to an agency or freelance in a French-speaking country, but not in Thailand or anywhere else.



I strongly believe that translations should always be done by translators that live in the target-language country and/or are native speakers of the target language. This is supported by ample scientific and anecdotal evidence, and anyone who \"breaks\" that rule must be willing to accept the consequences (ie, of being branded a non-professional). And, yes, there are exceptions, as always, but one swallow does not make a summer, remember? Plus, the gigantic number of bad translations (referring to Western language pairs only, not combinations involving the respective official language(s) of those countries) coming out of those countries also speaks volumes.



And, Hans, don\'t forget that people like that French translator of yours are very rare: 99% of, say, English to French translations sent to, for example, Thailand are done by people who a) are not translators and b) are not native speakers of either language in that pair - and that is the real problem; not some French guy who sips his drink on a tropical beach while knocking together a contract translation on his laptop.

[ This Message was edited by: on 2001-11-28 19:17 ]


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BernieM
Hong Kong
Local time: 11:44
French to English
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Exceptions may be worth considering! Nov 28, 2001

I consider myself to be one of the \'exceptions\' that you are all talking about.



I spent the first 30 years of my life in the UK and subsequently worked in Paris for 3 years and then Hong Kong for 4 years for a major international bank. I am a qualified accountant with 15 years experience in the financial services industry. I have also just sat all 3 papers of the Institute of Linguists\' Diploma in Translation. Although I have only recently turned to translation, I consider myself pretty well qualified as a French to English translator, particularly in the finance field!



I still live in Hong Kong as, theoretically at least, I can work out of any country, but my husband can not! This is not meant to be a sales pitch for my particular skills, I am just trying to make the point that you should not immediately write off a translator according to the location they are in vis-a-vis their language pair, as they may even turn out to be more suitable than translators who live in \'expected\' countries.


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International Translation Agency Ltd //
Local time: 05:44
English to French
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Definitely not! Nov 29, 2001

[quote]

On 2001-11-28 13:21, G2E wrote:

Depends: if you are talking about language pairs that include Thai, that may be fine. But never, never, never give a translation such as, for example, English to Spanish to a Thai agency or translator (or agencies from other countries outside the West).



As for these purely Western language pairs, Thailand, for example, does not have any \"qualified translators\" as you put it. Unless you want a translation into \"Thainglish\" - well, if that\'s what you want, then you\'ll certainly get your 2 cents\' worth





I have been working with translators from all over the world: US, Europe, Africa, etc...



There are very good ones out there. It is not because they reside in a developing country that they are no good translators! It\'s nonsensical!



It is also a fact that earning 5 US cents in Kenya is truly a decent rate.



Stop that Eurocentrism!



Good luck to all, North and South!



Rachid


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Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 23:44
German to English
+ ...
Reply to Rachid Nov 30, 2001

You are missing the point: in these countries, so-called \"translators\" translate from one foreign language into another foreign language.



I am sorry, but, for example, a Thai person is not qualified to do, say, English to French translations. They can do Thai to French or English to Thai - that\'s fine.



Translations must be done by professional translators who live in the target-language country and/or who are native speakers of the target language.


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Ursula Peter-Czichi  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:44
German to English
+ ...
Trust in Market Forces Dec 4, 2001

Supply and Demand will bring prices back to reasonable levels. If highly qualified translators have to bid too low, they will start using their brains and look for greener pastures.

After that, agencies will have to deal with this brain drain. It happens like this in all aspects of the economy, including the global economy.

Agencies that \'hire\' cheap translators, on average. sell an inferior product. Guess, which agencies will prevail?


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