Mobile menu

JEAN F. COVI payment practices
Thread poster: Chrystal

Chrystal
Local time: 21:07
English to French
+ ...
Nov 29, 2001

does anyone know an individual called Jean F. Covi based in the UK, also acting under \"evoice8\"

355 Byres Rd;

G12 8QD

UK

# 44 - 0958229566

# 441415508400





this guy had posted a job on ProZ around Mid-October and I did the job...the guy is not paying me, had deleted his email address and not giving any sign of life.



Any one knows anything about this person ???





[ This Message was edited by: on 2001-11-30 01:43 ]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Telesforo Fernandez
Local time: 01:37
English to Spanish
+ ...
For Henry, to note please Nov 30, 2001

Henry,

Please read what has happened to this translator. I do not know if it was private bid or open bid.

Due to the above reasons I have been always demanding full details of the job poster .

But you prefer to give less details of the job poster, just because you allow the translators also to give less details about themselves.

Those who cntact the translators( with scanty details) are not at loss, but it harms the translator who contacts the job poster with scanty information.

[ This Message was edited by: on 2001-11-30 03:37 ]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Monika Coulson  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:07
Member (2001)
English to Albanian
+ ...
Unfortunately there are lots of Jean F. Covis nowdays Dec 1, 2001

I have had this happening three times in my entire translator experience. All of these three cases were over seas (in France, in UK and Greece)... For the case in France, I even contacted an attorney, but the attorney was unable to contact the \"translation office\" so, I have not gotten any payment for those three translation and I never will.
[addsig]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Telesforo Fernandez
Local time: 01:37
English to Spanish
+ ...
It may worthwhile to read this Dec 2, 2001

I am just giving this article that I picked up, whicxh may help you :

Here below I am reproducing an article which tells you about Internet auctions for the benefit of our job bidders.

If you want to know if a particular business is a scam or you are being cheated find out all about it on : http://www.scambusters.org/



If you run into a problem during your transaction, try to work it out directly with the seller or with the auction web site. If that doesn\'t work, file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission( USA) by calling toll-free 1-877-FTC-HELP (382-4357) or visiting the FTC\'s web site at http://www.ftc.gov. Although the Commission cannot resolve individual problems for consumers, it can act against a company if it sees a pattern of possible law violations. You also may want to contact your state Attorney General or your local consumer protection office.



Avoiding internet scams :



Be suspicious of web sites that don\'t allow you to easily verify a company\'s identity and legitimacy by clearly providing a physical address, telephone number and email address.

The con artist continually alludes to the \"great potential for entrepreneurs\" on the Internet--with frequent references to the tens of millions of customers online--yet can’t show or explain the product you’re supposed to sell. This clown is trying to sell you pie-in-the-sky; if he or she can’t show you a product, can’t show results, and tries to sell you on \"potential\" only, forget it. It’s most likely an illegal pyramid scheme.



Do they offer you a free promotional site for your use with your own personal referral code? If you have to pay your entry or membership fee and then find out you have to pay another $100 or so to get a promotional site and email advertising package, and that is the only way they allow you to promote it, be leery. They are making their money up front. I don\'t believe that you should have to pay a company for basic promotional tools to promote their company. They can take the expense off as a business expense if they are for real.



The netrepreneur offers no physical address that’s not a mail drop, no voice telephone number, and no name. These are sure indicators that the scammer does not want you to find him or her later--and usually for good reason.





The information superhighway has become the newest medium for scam artists. Some of the same villains who used telemarketing, infomercials and the U.S. postal service are now turning their sights to the home computer and the realm of cyberspace. Utilizing the world wide web, scammers are able to reach more potential targets, not just in the U. S. but around the globe.

Many of these scams are run by two methods, classified and disguised advertising. Classified ads have the largest number of misleading promotions. These ads may advocate quick and easy weight loss, miracle cures or unusual medical devices, for example. Others push investment schemes or \"business opportunities.\" Still others taught using your PC to make money in your spare time.

Disguised ads are the second category and more difficult to recognize. Many of these disguised ads are found on bulletin boards and chat forums. People contributing to the bulletin board have ties to businesses that sell products or services related to the bulletin board area. Chat forums or chat rooms are live discussion groups which some advertisers use without disclosing their true interests. These may not be obvious ads, but may appear to be an objective, open discussion. But the cyber scams don\'t stop there. Here are some of the more common scams on the internet.

Web Auctions: In 1998 and 1999, the National Consumers League announced their top ten internet scams list. Number one on the list were web auctions. If you\'re looking for a hot collectible or a cheap airline ticket, online auctions may appeal to you. But before you place a cyber-bid, consider how some online auction houses work. Like a traditional \"live\" auction, the highest bidder wins. That\'s where the similarity ends. Because an online auction house doesn\'t have the merchandise, the highest bidder deals directly with the seller to complete the sale.

If you\'re the highest bidder, the seller typically will contact you by e-mail to arrange for payment and delivery. Most sellers accept credit cards or use a third-party escrow agent to handle the entire process. Be especially cautious, however, if the seller asks you to pay by certified check or money order. Some online sellers have put items up for auction, taken the highest bidder\'s money and never delivered the merchandise.

Web auctions can be deceptive in other ways, as well. Here\'s an example: one online auction offers airline tickets and vacation packages. At first glance everything looks fine. They set a very low minimum bid and a closing date. However, if you return on the closing or end date you\'ll find they extended the bidding time 3 or 4 days into the future. Thus the longer the auction continues, the higher the bidding goes. Airlines tickets purchased from a travel agent may be the same price or cheaper, without the hassles and risk. In other words, the item is no longer a good deal, since extended bidding has pumped up the price.

Online investing: Online investment fraud comes in many shapes and sizes. One category targeted at older Americans are called high-yield \"prime bank\" investments. Seniors who depend on interest and dividend income are vulnerable to con artists pushing phony \"prime bank\" investments that promise risk free annual returns of 20 percent to 200 percent or more.

These schemes go by other names such as: bank-secured trading programs, yield investment programs or standby letters of credit. So what\'s the common denominator? All are supposedly debt obligations guaranteed by the world\'s top 100 banks, hence the name, prime banks. Swindlers claim only big corporations, foreign banks or ultra-wealthy investors know about them. They\'re pitched as secret trading programs the Rothchilds and Rockefellers set up years ago, which are only offered to the elite. Often, investors are told not to investigate the offering independently or risk being permanently expelled from participating.

Self-employment or work-at-home scams: This type of scam was also on the National Consumers League top ten listing. Promises of a sure path to riches through work-at-home schemes are prevalent on the net. They take aim at anyone seeking supplemental income.

The most common work-at-home scam promises you\'ll earn money stuffing envelopes. For example, you\'re promised $2.00 for every envelope you stuff. In fact, no actual envelope stuffing ever happens. Instead, you pay to register and then you\'re instructed to send the same envelope-stuffing advertisement via bulk e-mail to others. The only money you can earn would come from others who fall for the same scam and pay to register. Finally, if you did do some type of work for them, such as craft work, they\'ll refuse to pay you, saying your work didn\'t measure up to their quality standards.

Chain letters: Here\'s an old favorite, up-dated for cyberspace. The speed and efficiency of emailing has caused email hoaxes to increase dramatically. Many work this way: you\'re asked to send a small amount of money (or some item) to each of four or five names at the top of the list, and then forward the message including your name at the bottom, via bulk email. Many of these letters claim to be legal, but they\'re probably not. Furthermore, nearly everyone who participates in these chain letters loses money. Don\'t bother.





As with any deal, beware of the offerings in cyberspace and be very selective about using your credit card online. It may be high-tech, but it can still be a scam.











Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tim Drayton  Identity Verified
Cyprus
Local time: 22:07
Turkish to English
+ ...
I have found a mention of him on the web Dec 2, 2001

With a little bit of detective work, I have found Jean F. Covi listed on this web page:

http://bettina.servouse.free.fr/fren.htm

where his e-mail address is listed as:

jfcovi@hotmail.com.

This may be information that you already have, but I thought it might help.



Direct link Reply with quote
 
Antonella Andreella  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 21:07
German to Italian
+ ...
Some hints Aug 18, 2003

Hallo everybody, I'm having payment problems with a guy who gave me (and other two Proz colleagues) a different name but the same address in Glasgow....

Regards
Antonella


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Ralf Lemster  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:07
English to German
+ ...
Can we use the Blue Board, please? Aug 18, 2003

Obviously, the Blue Board did not exist when this thread was posted - now it does, and there's both a BB entry and an associated profile.

Would anyone who has had personal experience with this outsourcer please use the Blue Board - if there are indeed indications of false details being used, please contact the Jobs Area coordinators.

Thanks, Ralf


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Antonella Andreella  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 21:07
German to Italian
+ ...
BB Aug 19, 2003

Hi Ralf,

unfortunately there is no longer any entry in the BB today

Regards

Antonella

[Edited at 2003-08-19 12:18]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Ralf Lemster  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:07
English to German
+ ...
Entry has been fused Aug 19, 2003

Hi Antonella,
There is; but there was a duplicate, which is why the two were merged into this entry.

This is also the one that comes up if you search for "Covi".

HTH - Ralf


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Antonella Andreella  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 21:07
German to Italian
+ ...
Double addresses Aug 19, 2003

Hi Ralf,

and what about the double addresses? In the fusion we lost the address in Glasgow, I guess we may have some POs issued with that address

Regards
Antonella


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Ralf Lemster  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:07
English to German
+ ...
Both entries are visible Aug 19, 2003

Sorry - although the entries were linked, they're both visible.

Suggestion: can we discuss technical details off-forum?

Cheers, Ralf


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

JEAN F. COVI payment practices

Advanced search


Translation news





SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »
TMreserve
Wake up in the Morning and see that you have sold TMs and made Money overnight



The TM Market Place for Translators
New: Our Instant TM Download
TM owners: Upload your TMs into the online database
Customers: Analyse your text & instantly download a text-specific TM
Well over 1.2 BILLION translation units

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs