Mobile menu

Dubbing : how to charge ?
Thread poster: Guillaume Wehrlen

Guillaume Wehrlen
France
Local time: 18:06
Spanish to French
+ ...
Nov 10, 2007

Hi !

I wonder how I would have to charge for translating a script for a movie to be dubbed. Is it paid by hour ? Could I simply charge according to my rate by source word and multiplying it by the amount of words I translate in an hour ? Should I charge a little bit more due to the fact that I have to make the number of syllables match ? Or a little bit less because I'm a beginner ?

Thanks in advance for your advice,

By the way sorry for my rather poor level in English, hope what I've written is understandable, it's not in my language pairs but I'm working to improve it !

Best regards,

Guillaume.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:06
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Minute of playing time Nov 10, 2007

Video translation, either for dubbing or subtitling, is normally charged per minute of total playing time.

The Brazilian translators syndicate - of which I am not a member - suggests charging twice as much per minute for dubbing than for subtitling. I wonder if any client would pay that much, even here.

They also include a substantial plus to the suggested price when the original script is not provided.

Quite frankly, as I began translating for dubbing about 20 years ago, and seldom was given a script, I don't charge differently with or without a script. I began translating for subtitling about 3 years ago, using the same rates as for dubbing.

Other pricing methods for translation for dubbing are:

- per package - usually when a translator is hired for a batch of movies, or on a rather permanent basis. A fixed amount is set for a whole full-feature movie, in the 90-160 minutes range.

- per word - this is a risky system for the client, however it is considered adequate for extremely technical films, where extensive termninology research may be required.

HTH.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Guillaume Wehrlen
France
Local time: 18:06
Spanish to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Rate per minute ? Nov 10, 2007

Hello José Henrique!

Thanks a lot for your explanation. It makes me things much clearer. I'd just like to have an idea of how much I possibly could charge for such a work. I've understood you used to do translations for dubbing and then you began to translate also for subtitling, charging the same as before. I've found in the "subtitling" forum prices such as 5/6 USD per minute, and you said the Bazilian Translators Syndicate suggests charging twice as much for dubbing which is more fantasy than reality.
So do you charge something in between ? How much more or less if I may ask ? And I believe in case of "per package" charging one should ask for a little bit less because of the quantity ?

Obrigadinho,

Guillaume.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
JulietteC
Local time: 18:06
English to French
Rates Nov 10, 2007

Hi Guillaume,

according to the SNAC, the recommended rates are the following :

• TARIFS EN VIGUEUR à compter du 1er septembre 2006 (sept. 2006)

Les auteurs de doublage et de sous-titrage réunis récemment en assemblée générale ont décidé d'un ajustement de leurs tarifs minima applicables aux commandes passées à compter du 1er septembre 2006. Ces tarifs n'ont pas été modifiés depuis le 1er avril 2004, il s'agit non pas d'une revalorisation mais simplement de la prise en compte du taux d'inflation depuis cette date.


DOUBLAGE
1 - Destiné à une exploitation télévisuelle: le tarif minimum pour les 10 minutes est de 259€
2 - Destiné à une exploitation cinématographique: le tarif minimum pour la bobine est de 341€
Tout film-annonce donnera lieu à une rémunération globale d'une demi-bobine.
Ces tarifs planchers s'entendent, texte conforme et machine fournie par l'entreprise hors détection et hors traduction littérale éventuelle. Ils s'appliquent sur la totalité de l'oeuvre doublée, c'est-à-dire génériques inclus, et même si une partie des dialogues est en français dans l'oeuvre originale.

SOUS-TITRAGE
1 - Sous-titre cinéma: 3,68€ hors repérage
2 - Sous-titre télévision: 2,63€ hors repérage

VOICE OVER
34€ le feuillet (25 lignes de 60 signes, 1 script conforme fourni).

5/6 USD per minute is a very low rate. Some agencies are not professionnal and offer this kind of rate, but if you live in France and work for this rate, you will earn less than the French SMIC.

Juliette.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Guillaume Wehrlen
France
Local time: 18:06
Spanish to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks ! Nov 10, 2007

Thank you Juliette for all this information !

Guillaume.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:06
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Brazilian situation Nov 11, 2007

Guillaume,

As you translate from Spanish, you might understand Portuguese, (I know it is more difficult for you than for us to understand Spanish) so the suggested rates are here: http://www.sintra.org.br/site/index.php?pag=valores
and you may convert our currency using http://www.x-rates.com/d/BRL/table.html

In practice, these rates are more "wishful thinking" than the reality, which is often lower. This syndicate does not have a numerous membership, and these prices are merely suggestions. Of course, no such entity would suggest low prices while struggling for their members.

The reason I charge the same for both is that I'm self-restricted to the high-end of this market. My method is very time-consuming, but it renders top quality sync dubbing. This has kept me limited to training, institutional, technical and other kinds of corporate video. The net result is that in my case there more value added to the translation itself in terms of content, than in the fact that it's not just written text. This is why I use the same rate.

The sets of techniques used to translate for dubbing and subtitling are quite different, I'm sure you are aware of that. The net result, because of the artists involved (which are heavily unionized, and have very strict rules and rates), is that for the end client, to dub a film is roughly 3 times more expensive than having it subtitled, in most cases.

The fixed price per film (or per episode in a series) is mostly for TV, when a dubbing studio wants to be able to bid wholesale, without having to negotiate on playing time. If it's only a 90-min film, it's about half of what I'd charge. But if it's longer, the rate may get worse. I did once translate a (very boring) 160-min film at this rate, to rescue an otherwise good and frequent client who got into trouble with such per-film arrangement. No other translator would take it at this rate.

Quality in film translation, at least in Brazil, comes in all shades you can think of, and we see the results on TV. Disney films dubbed in Brazil are consistently the top benchmark any translator/dubber in the world should try to reach; they are as demanding as it can get. The lower end would be tough to describe. Anyway, the individual translation rates here follow quality accordingly.

Good luck!

[Edited at 2007-11-11 12:39]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Guillaume Wehrlen
France
Local time: 18:06
Spanish to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Obrigado Nov 12, 2007

Thank you !

Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Dubbing : how to charge ?

Advanced search


Translation news





WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »
Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs