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Off topic: The last straw in SPAM (in my name!)
Thread poster: Patricia Posadas

Patricia Posadas  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 02:45
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Apr 25, 2003

Hello,



Today I received a message from someone saying \"stop this\". His message was a reply to a SPAM message supposedly sent by me to a list of people!!! With my first and last names in the e-mail adress! (patricia.posadas@etc.) Can you imagine the consequences such a thing may have on one\'s image? It may even have legal consequences...



I have contacted my Internet provider and got no answer yet, but I have changed my password just in case.



Has anybody heard of a similar thing?





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Giuliana Buscaglione  Identity Verified
Austria
Local time: 03:45
Member (2001)
German to Italian
+ ...
A trojan? Apr 25, 2003

Hi Patricia,



I have read something similar on Langit last week. I can\'t remember all details, but two possible reasons were proposed by other colleagues: a trojan or the email address was \"collected\" by a robot scanning MLs member lists....







Giuliana
[addsig]


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xxxElena Sgarbo  Identity Verified
Italian to English
+ ...
Yes, it happened to me last year Apr 25, 2003

Messages from my e-mail were flodding the inboxes of everyone in my address book.



It turned out to be caused by a new virus that I had received from an unknowing sender.



I then updated my Antivirus protection, and had not had any more problems since.



Good luck, Patricia!



Elena


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JCEC  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 21:45
Member
English to French
Try Ad-aware Apr 25, 2003

Hello Patricia,



The problem you describe is reminiscent of the behavior of some viruses. If you have an up-to-date virus protection, it may be a trojan as suggested by Giuliana. I would recommend running a software like Ad-aware 6.0 which can be downloaded at no charge from several Web sites.



It is especially likely if you use Internet Explorer which is the favorite target of most hackers. I recently discovered 7 spies attached to Internet Explorer on a client\'s computer. Fortunately he was using Netscape !



And you did the right thing in notifying your service provider.



John



[ This Message was edited by: JCEC on 2003-04-25 12:34]


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Joeri Van Liefferinge  Identity Verified
Belgium
Local time: 03:45
Member (2002)
English to Dutch
+ ...
Same here a month or two ago Apr 25, 2003

Two months or so ago, I received a similar reply from a Proz member. He had received an email message which looked as if I had sent it (which I had not). I mailed him back, explaining what had probably happened, but it\'s true that is is weird and could damage our image.



As it was a message from a Proz member to another Proz member, I wonder if it is possible that the spammer got our addresses from this site? (I reported the problem to the Proz staff, so I\'m sure they\'re doing everything they can to avoid this.)





Joeri


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Rick Henry  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 20:45
Italian to English
+ ...
Here's how it works (unfortunately)... Apr 25, 2003

Spammers routinely harvest email addresses off anything on the web. They also have programs that look for \"open relays\" - in short - computers (servers) not properly configured for mail. They then use these misconfigured servers to blast out their spam, using not their own email address as a \"reply-to\", but some of the harvested addresses, or even made-up ones. So, when someone receives spam and angrily tries to respond to the \"sender\", the reply goes to whatever address is in the \"reply-to\" field. Spammers are not in the business to actually receive replies or respond to them. They\'re in the business to send out as many emails to as many people as they can, which just pisses people off (well, me anyway). If the person who sent you the \"response\" were to actually look at his email headers, he\'d most likely see that you are only the \"reply-to\" and nothing else. To get to the real sender, he\'d have to check and compare the \"sender\", \"return-path\" and \"received: from\" fields in the header. Even then, that\'s no guarantee that the information is accurate. Spammers are slime (my opinion, shared by many) who will use any means available to blast out their junk. When you get email from a legitimate business, they ALWAYS provide a valid way to reply/inquire about their product.

Unfortunately, until something is done (either through legal or technological means) this is the reality of email. Spammers have really ruined a great communications tool.

Sigh.



R.

==

Quote:


On 2003-04-25 11:48, Patricia P wrote:

Hello,



Today I received a message from someone saying \"stop this\". His message was a reply to a SPAM message supposedly sent by me to a list of people!!! With my first and last names in the e-mail adress! (patricia.posadas@etc.) Can you imagine the consequences such a thing may have on one\'s image? It may even have legal consequences...



I have contacted my Internet provider and got no answer yet, but I have changed my password just in case.



Has anybody heard of a similar thing?







[ This Message was edited by: Rick Henry on 2003-04-25 13:59]

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Uldis Liepkalns  Identity Verified
Latvia
Local time: 04:45
Member (2003)
English to Latvian
+ ...
Some viruses, eg., Klez, forge addresses Apr 25, 2003

from which the infected mail is sent. We regularly receive varnings, that our system is infected, when in fact it is not. Simply some client, who has our address in his address book, acquires Klez, and Klez sents out his copies with random addresses from infected systems address book in the field \"From\".

The deceit is seen, if option \"Show all headers\" is used, but few people can read it
[addsig]


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Monika Coulson  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:45
Member (2001)
English to Albanian
+ ...
E-mail spoofing Apr 25, 2003

A few days ago, CNN had an article on this problem. Among other things, this article says:

... \"The tactic, known as e-mail spoofing, requires little technical know-how and no illegal computer break-ins. Yet it has caused a lot of trouble -- wasting time, damaging reputations and even leading to the suspension of e-mail accounts...\"

... \"Spoof messages often legal



Spoofing generally isn\'t illegal because no hacking is required, FBI officials say, leaving prosecutors with little recourse unless there\'s a threat of death or violence involved. And finding culprits is tough -- after all, they are using someone else\'s identity.



Though messages carry an electronic version of the postmark, which can sometimes betray a spoof, few bother or know how to check. Instead, they assume the message is genuine.



The purported senders then get angry replies -- along with e-mails returned as undeliverable because they went to bad addresses or full mailboxes. These returns are how individuals and groups learn they\'ve been spoofed...\"



You can read the whole article by clicking on http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/internet/04/21/hate.email.ap/index.html


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Patricia Posadas  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 02:45
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks! Apr 26, 2003

Now I can put a name on it, spoofing! I was almost sure it wasn\'t a virus, I use the Live Upate system in Norton, but I checked it anyway.



Well if I get spam from a colleague I\'ll check whether it wasn\'t spoof. What a wild weird world we live in!



Have a nice WE


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Uldis Liepkalns  Identity Verified
Latvia
Local time: 04:45
Member (2003)
English to Latvian
+ ...
Dear Patricia Apr 26, 2003

You do not have to have a virus, it is enough that somone, who has your email listed in his Outlook\'s address book, has. And Klez starts sending out itself from his machine, but with your address in the \"From\" field
[addsig]


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Róbert Gulyás
Local time: 03:45
spreading e-mails Apr 27, 2003

Dear Patricia,



I am afraid your system has been infected [agreed must be a trojan] so you would better use Norton AntiVirus - they are usually up-to-date for such niceties and are able to eliminate unwanted sendings...



With regards, Róbert



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