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Off topic: Please comment on new domain name (non-translation)
Thread poster: Csaba Ban

Csaba Ban  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 10:54
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Aug 4, 2008

Dear All,

This is really off-topic. Or maybe it isn't. I'd like to find out what you think of two possible domain names for a new web application. Please tell me what you think the website will be about.

kultix.com

kultotopia.com

Both are candidates for the same website. It would be interesting to find out what people with different mother tongues may think about these. The only hint I can give you at this stage that the site will be targeted to an international audience, with a European focus (and has nothing to do with translation).

Thank you for your input

Csaba


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xxxPeter Manda
Local time: 05:54
German to English
+ ...
culty? Aug 5, 2008

The first thing that came to mind was Shoko-Asahara and his multitude of culty cultix. If you are thinking of cultivation or cultivating something, I would add a v. The same idea applies for German. Unless of course you are with a cult - in which case, well the site would speak for itself ...

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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:54
English to German
+ ...
My first impression Aug 5, 2008

I did not google or anything, let's just create a market research situation with unsupported questions:

My spontaneous associations:

Kult = (the way it's used these days) Black Metal, Wikka, Celtic, Satanism, anything religious / spiritual that does not conform to major world religions

The suffix "-ix":

Reminds me of my beloved "Asterix & Obelix" comics (I know each of them by heart..), where this suffix was used to represent fellows from countries such as France, Belgium and Switzerland during "Roman times".

Kultopia:

I don't get very good associations with this one. It sounds like some random cult being over the top.

That's only one opinion out of 6.6 billion people on this planet.


Interesting thread, Csaba! I will certainly watch this one.

Greetings!


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chica nueva
Local time: 22:54
Chinese to English
Nice or not? Aug 5, 2008

Hi Csaba

are you looking for possible nasty associations?
Here is one: ku/klu klux klan cult
probably my first memory of c exchanged for k

'kultix' reminds me of 'topix' news site.

Lesley

[Edited at 2008-08-05 00:44]


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xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 10:54
Spanish to English
+ ...
English and Spanish Aug 5, 2008

I agree with the two previous posters re the initial connotations of "kult" in English.

In Spanish, however, "culto" means "learned" (that is, a first connotation). A "cult", I think, would be referred to as a "secta". That said, the use of the "k" spelling, in Spnish, to supplant the "c" spelling, is associated with a sub-culture deriving from Basque anarchism (maybe a Spanish person might correct me here), a sort of subversion of standard Spanish. As one example, "ocupar" is "occupy" literally, but "okupar" / "okupa" is about squatters.



[Edited at 2008-08-05 00:36]


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Csaba Ban  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 10:54
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
additional info Aug 5, 2008

Any meaningful words and any combinations thereof are already taken as domain names. So I deliberately searched for strings that Google doesn't know, but they still may carry some meaning.

And yes, this is a kind of market research, a very preliminary one. If most repondents think of something completely different than what I had in mind, I'll have to pick another name.

Don't restrict yourselves, and don't let existing responses influence you. I'm really interested to know what people think first when they see these "words".

Csaba


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Yaotl Altan  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 03:54
Member (2006)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Kultix Aug 5, 2008

I like Kultix, it sounds like Latin. I dislike Kultotopia because of that doubled "to" syllable.

Best regards!


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Allesklar  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 20:24
Member (2005)
English to German
+ ...
with Yaotl Aug 5, 2008

Kultix sounds to my German ears like "kultig", a colloquialism for cool.

With Yaotl on Kulttotopia, maybe kultopia


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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:54
Flemish to English
+ ...
Asterix Aug 5, 2008

Kultix, like Asterix, Obelix, Panormamix, par Toutatis.

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Mats Wiman  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 10:54
Member (2000)
German to Swedish
+ ...
One Scandinavian reaction Aug 5, 2008

Kultix: Too short, sounds like a trade mark, not something new (which I assume they want to convey)

Kultopia sounds good: Cultural utopia, conveying an avantgarde impression.

Using 'k' means adding mnemonic glue to the word, 'k' being non-normal in many languages (English, Spanish, French, Italian, Portugueese) just like the 'Z' in KudoZ.

I often used Q for that reason.

Best
Mats


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Eleni Makantani
Greece
Local time: 11:54
Partial member
English to Greek
+ ...
C for culture Aug 5, 2008

I get the point that it might be a site on culture. If it's true, I like Kultotopia better than Kultix, however it brings to my mind Utopia and I don't know if that's good or bad. "Kultopia" is definitely better, a place for culture (culture + topos). If the initial K can be replaced with a C, then the kult notion that others have emphasised in that thread might not exist anymore.

Therefore, cultopia.com!


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:54
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Some wilder possibilities Aug 5, 2008

Kultix = Cull ticks! Drastically reduce the number of these pestilent insects!
Kultotopia = Cool Tot Utopia - paradise for little children who want to be fashionable.

P.S. You are right to be cautious about possible undesirable associations in other languages.
There is a kitchen cleaning product which was sold for many years in the UK under the name of Jif - association with the colloquial word "jiffy", meaning a very brief period of time, so indicating it would do its job very rapidly. Kitchen cleaning cloths are popularly known as "jiffy cloths", for the same reason.
But then they wanted to market it in Europe, and they were worried about the letter "j" being pronounced in quite different ways in other languages - Spanish and German, for instance - so now they call it "Cif" - which may be easier to pronounce for non-English speakers, but in English it sounds like "Syph" - an abbreviation for a venereal disease.

[Edited at 2008-08-05 07:07]


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Giuliana d'Orazi Flavoni
Italy
Local time: 10:54
Italian to English
TV channels Aug 5, 2008

Hello there,

I don’t know why (and I don’t know whether it helps or not) … but as soon as I saw kultix I thought of the children’s channel on Sky: “jetix”… so, I suppose I would associate it with children, cartoons and TV.

You’re right to be careful though!

There is a well known brand of jewelry in Italy that has recently started advertising its new line with the (rather unfortunate) name of “Yukey”.

I think it’s meant to be pronounced “UK”, but to me it just looks like “yucky”!

Best of luck!


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Csaba Ban  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 10:54
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
thank you so far Aug 5, 2008

Thank you for all comments, I find them very useful.

Keep commenting!

Csaba


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Penelope Ausejo  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 10:54
English to Spanish
+ ...
Not sure... Aug 5, 2008

Lia Fail wrote:

In Spanish, however, "culto" means "learned" (that is, a first connotation). A "cult", I think, would be referred to as a "secta". That said, the use of the "k" spelling, in Spnish, to supplant the "c" spelling, is associated with a sub-culture deriving from Basque anarchism (maybe a Spanish person might correct me here), a sort of subversion of standard Spanish. As one example, "ocupar" is "occupy" literally, but "okupar" / "okupa" is about squatters.



[Edited at 2008-08-05 00:36]


I agree with Lia.

Regarding the use of the "K" lately, it has been widely used in internet chats and cell phone messages to replace "que". For instance, "quedamos" would become "kdms"

IMO, Kultix sounds too informal, aiming at the young people who use this "language" (the kdms one). However, somehow it seems as if it is "making fun" of learned people.

Kultotopia, the 1st that came to my mind was photocopies... Photocopies for learned people? about "deep stuff"? not sure about this name either for the Spanish market.


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