Off topic: Boston, tourist attractions
Thread poster: Binnur Tuncel van Pomeren

Binnur Tuncel van Pomeren  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 00:53
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Sep 10, 2008

Dear collegues,

I am planning to spend one week in Boston (from 30th Sep till 6 October). I will go there to visit my friend and the city, although some professional connections are not out of question while I am there.

Do you have any suggestions as what and where to visit?

I appreciate your suggestions.

Nice day to all!

Binnur


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Liliana Roman-Hamilton  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:53
English to Italian
My ideas Sep 10, 2008

The first thing that comes to my mind about what to see in Boston is the Freedom Trail which is a 2 mile walk along 16 historic landmarks (Boston was one of the first and most important colonial towns in the New World). So if you're interested in history, I'd go for that. For more info, take a look at this site: http://www.thefreedomtrail.org/

There is also a beautiful museum, the Museum of Fine arts downtown.

Trinity Church is also another city landmark.


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Binnur Tuncel van Pomeren  Identity Verified
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Good morning America Sep 10, 2008

Why, I was starting to think if my question was not really worth answering, when I remembered that it was a too early a frustration. American friends and collegues or or residents are most likely just awake!

Dear Liliana,

I have already had an opportunity to look up the website you mentioned about. Before I will copy-paste the information and decorate the forum with a lot of thanks I will just peek into other infos you gave me.

I am already grateful about the freedom trail..Thank you!

Warmest regards,
Binnur


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Liliana Roman-Hamilton  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:53
English to Italian
Other tips Sep 10, 2008

Binnur,

I think that by the time you visit Boston, you'll be in full Fall Foliage season, so definitely plan some day trips to Greater Boston, North of Boston and Merrimack Valley regions. Here you can get an updated report of the foliage in this incredible website: http://www.foliagenetwork.com/reports/ . Click under "northeast" on the right side and you will see an updated report of the foliage progression. Up to Sept 10 2008 the trees were still green, darn, but by end of Sept, beginning of Oct it will surely get better for the foliage.

Other suggestions:
I recommend to take a city tour to get a general look (on one of the trolley tours or the Duck Tour which includes a short cruise on the Charles River, gives you a good introduction to Boston and is fun. You need reservations for the The Duck tour btw, because it's pretty popular. Advice: take the Duck Tour if the weather is nice). The trolley gets you around to everything, you can get on and off, do all day if you want and you get alot of info.

Check also info on the "Go Boston Card" (http://www.gobostoncard.com/ ) as it gives you lots of discounts, as well as the option of getting discounts for the ferries to Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket (great day trip destinations just outside of Boston). The GBC card can be a great deal, but you do need to plan very carefully what you want to see and if the things you want to see are included in the card. So if you're a planner, check it out!

For great eats, try the North End which is right near the Fanueil Hall area. It's an old Italian section with many great restaurants (don't call it Little Italy!) . You can also take a culinary tour of the North End which provides great historical background of the neighborhood, plus you can get to eat tasty treats at some stops along the way. For great Italian pastries, try Mike's Pastry on 300 Hanover Street. For moderately priced places to eat try Pagliuca's, Antico Forno or Maurizio's. For good pizza choose Pizzeria Regina. For a bite and go lunch choose Galleria Umberto or also Mangia Mangia. If you like seafood I've heard that Neptune Oyster is a good place to go. One last advice: avoid any place in the North End with someone on the sidewalk trying to waive you in. These spots are tourist traps!


You can also take a trip to the Boston Islands ( http://bostonislands.com/ ).

Hope these suggestions could give you some hints in planning your trip to the gorgeous Northeast!


[Edited at 2008-09-11 00:03]


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xxxjacana54  Identity Verified
Uruguay
English to Spanish
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also Sep 10, 2008

Hi,

I didn't answer earlier because I felt slightly ridiculous...writing from South America about Boston. I fully agree with Liliana's suggestions, and only dare to add a few because I went to a university in a small town near there many years ago and I loved going to the city (and revisited it a couple of times later on, of course).

I would add: don't miss Harvard Square, the wonderful buildings in the university yard, and all the places to eat, bookstores and shops in the neighborhood. It's a good idea to get to Cambridge on the subway because it crosses the river over the bridge, so you get an excellent view!

If you are interested in art and architecture, I also recommend: Beacon Hill, the Public Library, the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum.

Should you decide to go to New York, I suggest taking the train (not the one via Springfield but the one along the coast) the views are spectacular.

Enjoy your trip! (and listen for that Boston accent... they never park the car, it's pock the coh for them)



Lucía





[Edited at 2008-09-10 21:00]

[Edited at 2008-09-10 21:00]


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Boston hints Sep 11, 2008

Hello, I actually grew up in Boston and then went on to Boston University, so I'm quite acquainted with the city. As previously stated, the changing foliage will be beautiful, and the main park in the heart of the city (get off at "Park Street" on the green/red train lines) will be a great place to see some of it, especially because once you are outside, you will be able to see the gold-domed State House. Nearby are also several very old Colonial cemeteries and you can visit the grave of Benjamin Franklin and those of other famous people. The park is in two sections, so follow the huge path in the middle of it to get to the nicer "posher" bit, which looks very Victorian/Edwardian.

For a famous Boston treat, head over to the Little Italy section of Boston ("Haymarket" stop on the green/ orange train line) and you will find many fine restaurants and the VERY famous Mike's Pastry shop; if you walk around Boston, you will see many people sporting small pastry boxes from Mike. As I understand, Mike is in his 90s and was an immigrant from Italy. The place is usually packed, especially on Saturdays and Sundays, but any local will be able to give you instructions to get there if you need them. If you go, please eat a freshly-filled cannolo on my behalf. If you get off at Haymarket you can also visit Fanueil Hall, which is now an ok shopping district, but the area is historical and there are several historic buildings to visit.

"Copley" on the green line is a business and shopping/leisure center, and there is the huge Trinity Church built on planks, the Copley Library with a renaissance courtyard, and the parallel Newbury Street which is a chic street with good shopping and nice cafes (go to Cafe Torrefazione to try their own blend of coffee, all served on Italian pottery from Deruta, Italy, I believe it is 40 Newbury Street? Or maybe 50...)

If you enjoy sports, take the green line outbound to "Kenmore" and you can see the Green Monster, which is the home baseball stadium of the Boston Red Socks. You will also be at my Alma Mater, Boston University! Nearby is Boston Latin School, the oldest public school in the United States and was frequented by many famous people, I went there so I must show it off a bit, please excuse me!

There are many other nice places, including Castle Island, which is an old fort on the ocean with a long boardwalk-style area, so people jog/ roller blade/ walk there religiousl and the ocean breeze is great, plus you can see the planes landing at Logan Airport (I'm sure you will see it if you arrive by plane). This is in Southie, or South Boston, an area originally with a huge Irish population.

Nearby Cambridge is great, you can go to Harvard University, that area is really worth seeing, it is creative and lots of various shops and restaurants, etc. Take the red train line to "Harvard."

I hope this gives you a nice idea of the area. I'd show you around but a bit too far away. Hope your visit goes well!


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Binnur Tuncel van Pomeren  Identity Verified
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Now is a super time to thank you all for your inputs. Sep 11, 2008

Dear friends,

Last evening and today until now have been a prep time for me, in the light of your directions for Boston.

I see that the city has a lot to offer. I have given two days for this surrounding, assuming that I will breathlessly walk from early in the morning till late in the afternoon throughout the city.

One day for: Historical tour (Freedom trail), cemetery, panoramic view from the Park over the gold-domed State House, treats and lunch around Haymarket.
Trinity Church
(50 km back to MA)
Another day for: Cambridge (more specifically Harward University), a rather relaxing tour to digest the sphere of how people live and I might have lived there in the surrounding of Boston.
Cheers bar (is it in Boston. While I was surfing the website of Ducks Tour, it seemed to me I have seen its picture)???
(50 km back to MA)


Next, I suppose I also have to plan for Massachussetts as I should head to Massachusetts (it is what the Google Earth tells me . I did not know that MA was that far from Boston - a long distance for European understanding).

Do you know anything about MA? How do you travel in USA? Should I take a bus or train from the airport?

And Lucia, do not underestimate your knowledge after so many years you spent there. I lived 3 years in Pretoria in South Africa and suppose I know the place and history better than locals, yet do not ask anything about Izmir, Turkey. I am unfortunately quite illiterate about the place I was born (my interest for the city grew somehow late). I have jotted your suggestions as well, and already scheduled to follow them if time permits.

Lovely regards to all and thank you for all suggestions and invitations (to Katarzyna) to show me around.

Binnur


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xxxjacana54  Identity Verified
Uruguay
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you lost me now Sep 11, 2008

Binnur,

I didn't understand this part: "I did not know that MA was that far from Boston ".

Where is it that you want to go?

L


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Binnur Tuncel van Pomeren  Identity Verified
Germany
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Massachusetts: my final destination Sep 11, 2008

I will stay in Massachusetts, but MA is not far from Boston (only 50 km) (thus two days in Boston look feasible)
One day Connecticut (only 113 km) (definite plan)
Old Sturbridge Village (OSV) (38,24 km)
Weekend with my friends ...

As my plane would land to Boston, I had thought MA would be nearby. However, planning more and more I realised the exact location of my friends vs all the places above and saw to my surprise, that Boston city it is not walking distance to their house.

Have a nice working day.

Binnur


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xxxjacana54  Identity Verified
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Boston is in Massachusetts Sep 11, 2008

I suppose your friends live in another town, but it's all very close by and there is a good chance that you will find trains or buses to take you there.

MA is the name of the state, Massachusetts. On the regular mail address, the word before MA will be the name of the place where your friends live: eg. Westport, MA 02791.

Then try to find it here: www.mbta.com (public transportation in the Boston area)

From Logan airport to your accomodations in Boston I would take the subway into the city first.

In the USA I prefer trains to buses, but they are a bit more expensive.

I hate airplanes and airports all over the world!

L

[Edited at 2008-09-11 11:43]

[Edited at 2008-09-11 11:54]


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Binnur Tuncel van Pomeren  Identity Verified
Germany
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Hmm. Shrewsbury is how I should call the name maybe Sep 11, 2008

Dear Lucia,

I hate airplanes and airports all over the world!


You are now a certified environment friendly person. Congratulations!

I think you put it rightly. The name of the city is Shrewsbury. I will check the website you gave me. I will hope this encompasses a large area spinning a diameter as far as 50 km.

Bye for now.

Binnur

[Edited at 2008-09-11 11:58]


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