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Off topic: Did you used to read comics when you were young?
Thread poster: Gianni Pastore

Gianni Pastore  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 23:41
Member (2007)
English to Italian
Sep 16, 2008

I believe I've spent a fortune on Marvels'. But being quite a loner it was the only way to escape grim reality

My favourite was of course was Spidey, but was also keen on Dare Devil and the Fantastic Four. I could pass hours staring at these beautiful covers. This one in particular:



Any other fan out there?
G


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Capesha  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:41
Member (2006)
English to German
+ ...
When I was young? Sep 16, 2008

I still love them.
Spiderman, the loveley pictures of Asterix & Obelix, the strange humour of Clever & Smart, the wonderful pictures of the heavymetal comics, showing men and women as they should be *hm* - and also the German "Die Sturmtruppen", showing that there is a lot of good humour in the army.

If I had more talent, I would try to earn my money with comics.....


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Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:41
English to Arabic
+ ...
Certainly none of that, but... Sep 16, 2008

Asterix,
Tintin,
Lucky Luke,
and The Peanuts

My childhood wouldn't have been the same without them.


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Mirella Soffio  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 23:41
Member (2002)
English to Italian
+ ...
Couldn't stand the Fantastic Four... Sep 16, 2008

... but I had a huge crush on Peter Parker


Mirella


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Özden Arıkan  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:41
Member
English to Turkish
Oh, and how! Sep 16, 2008

My childhood crush was Karaoğlan, the son of Baybora, the ally of Ejder, the reckless enemy of Camoka, and the only man who was able to beat Bayırgülü -in a very gentlemanly fashion, I must add- in a duel to become her lover He was brave, strong, smart, very witty, and damn handsome - oh, he was dark, too, hence his name, "the dark guy."



I recently discovered this comics was published in French, too, under the name Kébir (have no idea where they found that name)




I wasn't too fond of mutant or cross-dressing heroes like Spiderman or Superman, but on a more international level, my favorite was Vampirella, the good female vampire who sucked her victims only enough to feed herself but always short of killing them - unless they were evil, of course But then, I have always been a huge and proud fan of horror & gore!



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Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:41
English to Arabic
+ ...
As a child? Sep 16, 2008

Özden Arıkan wrote:
on a more international level, my favorite was Vampirella, the good female vampire who sucked her victims only enough to feed herself but always short of killing them - unless they were evil, of course But then, I have always been a huge and proud fan of horror & gore!



I'm seeing you in a completely different light now, Özden!!


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Özden Arıkan  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:41
Member
English to Turkish
Why? Sep 16, 2008

Nesrin wrote:

I'm seeing you in a completely different light now, Özden!!


Is it more terrifying than the story of Hensel and Gretel? Little children waiting to be fried alive by an ogre or something... Or, do you have any idea how much I cried everytime I read the story of the poor Little Match-Girl? Had Vampirella been there, she would never allow her to freeze to death out in the cold!


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Clarisa Moraña  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 18:41
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
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Sure! Sep 16, 2008

My favorite, at about 10 years old was "La Pequeña Lulu" (I ignore the name in English).

150

Also, Fantomas, Superman, Supergirl.

As a teenager, I loved, and I still love Corto Maltés, by Hugo Pratt.



In Argentina there is a whole generation of youngs who read lot of comics, such as Patoruzito, and Intervalo, El Tony, which was the first magazine in Argentina only for comics, D'artagnan...

Nice topic!


[Edited at 2008-09-16 20:46]


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Gianni Pastore  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 23:41
Member (2007)
English to Italian
TOPIC STARTER
Not to mention... Sep 16, 2008

Clarisa Moraña wrote:

In Argentina there is a whole generation of youngs who read lot of comics, such as Patoruzito, and Intervalo, El Tony, which was the first magazine in Argentina only for comics, D'artagnan...


...one of the greatest stories I've ever read, El Eternauta, from the argentinians Héctor Oesterheld and Francisco Solano Lopez. A masterpiece indeed!!!
G

[Edited at 2008-09-16 20:52]


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Clarisa Moraña  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 18:41
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
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That's true! Sep 16, 2008

Yes, a masterpiece!


Gianni Pastore wrote:

Clarisa Moraña wrote:

In Argentina there is a whole generation of youngs who read lot of comics, such as Patoruzito, and Intervalo, El Tony, which was the first magazine in Argentina only for comics, D'artagnan...


...one of the greatest stories I've ever read, El Eternauta, from the argentinians Héctor Oesterheld and Francisco Solano Lopez. A masterpiece indeed!!!
G

[Edited at 2008-09-16 20:52]


My kids are requested to read it at school! And they enjoy it!


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Jabberwock  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 23:41
Member (2004)
English to Polish
Of course I did! Well, I still do... Sep 16, 2008

I read anything with letters on it, so comics were not an exception...

Marvels were OK, but they came somewhat late to Poland. We had to make do with the adventures of the brave Militia officer, Captain Żbik...



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kapitan_Żbik

There was also Relax, a cult (then and now) comics magazine:
http://www.relax.klub.chip.pl/0/enter.htm

When I got somewhat older there was the revelation: Funky Koval printed in the Fantastyka magazine... I do not know how many times I have re-read it...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funky_Koval

Thorgal was there, too...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thorgal

Cartoons, of course, were fun, as well! Garfield, and the Peanuts, and Calvin and Hobbes...





Today it is quite different... So many titles, so many books to read... Just mentioning them could take half a thread!



[Edited at 2008-09-16 21:09]

[Edited at 2008-09-16 21:10]


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:41
Member (2000)
Russian to English
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UK comics in the early 1940s Sep 16, 2008

Comics were still being published in the UK during the Second World War, though with a limited number of pages.
Comics for young children were all in picture form, but those for boys of about 8-12 were a bit more "literary". consisting mostly of adventure stories. I read mostly the Hotspur, and also the Wizard and the Rover. I remember a series of stories about a grim working-class athlete called Wilson, another one about a pilot in the First World War who was also a boxer: "Rockfist Rogan RFC", who suddenly jumped forward to the Second World War as "Rockfist Rogan RAF", apparently without getting any older. There were also stories about the lives of boys at public schools (in our terms not public at all, but what in any other country would be called private schools). The adventures of a fat repulsive boy called Billy Bunter at a school called Greyfriars were featured in a comic called The Magnet. Science fiction got a look-in too. I remember a series set on Saturn, which was apparently a warm planet teeming with all sort of weird life forms.
Couldn't find any pictures old enough for my day, but these of the Wizard & Hotspur are from the late 40s or early 50s.



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Amy Duncan  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 18:41
Portuguese to English
+ ...
What a festive thread! Sep 16, 2008

I was a kid in the early 1950s and I thank God I had a mother who let me and my sister read comic books. Such a thing was kind of unusual in the USA in those days. We had big stacks of them - mostly Donald Duck, Uncle Scrooge, Mickey Mouse, Bugs Bunny, Woody Woodpecker, Porky Pig, Little Lulu, Wonder Woman, Archie, Felix the Cat, Nancy. Later on we also read Classics Comics - illustrated versions of classic literature - which I loved. All these comics made a big impression on me and I learned a lot from them.

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texjax DDS PhD  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:41
Member (2006)
English to Italian
+ ...
My top 3 Sep 16, 2008

Tex


The "first" Tex is an unwillingly outlaw man with a code of honour: to kill only for self-defence. [..] Tough, loyal, infallible with guns, enemy of prejudice and discrimination, Tex is very quick, and has a quite high disregard for rules....well…that’s me!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tex_Willer

Mister No (he was just too cool!)


I Classici di Topolino
My absolute favourite, I still read them!


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xxxJPW  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:41
Spanish to English
+ ...
Off topic: off topic. Sep 16, 2008

Oh what the hey, this wasn't a comic as such, or perhaps there was a 'spin-off', but it was my favourite cartoon when I was a nipper: Roobarb and Custard, the opening titles of which can be viewed here (thank you, You Tube):-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L52idWDN9Nw

I am not sure what this sign *** :- *** is actually called, but it does have a slang name in English (too rude for here) which is why I included it above, for irony's sake, don't worry if you don't get it...

But if you click on the link, be warned, the music is mad and the cartoon itself looks like it was drawn on the bus on the way to work

The poor dog always copped it and the cat sat on the fence and laughed. GRRR, I hated that cat!

Mr Benn was another favourite; I much preferred animation to comics. In fact that's what I wanted to be: an animator. Ah well. Maybe in another life. Wish I was a cat now...


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