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Off topic: Russian-sounding word - what does it mean?
Thread poster: Paul Dixon

Paul Dixon  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 08:22
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Mar 4, 2009

Here in Brazil we have an advert for a cable TV system in which the actor (a man dressed in typical Russian garb) says a word that sounds something like SKAFOOSKA. I wonder if this means anything in Russian or other Eastern European language?

The advert is set in Siberia and the slogan asks people to come away from Siberia and buy xxxx Combo. I assume that the idea of the advertisement is to portray Siberia as somewhere dull, without colour, a bit like ordinary TV (as opposed to cable).

The word SKAFOOSKA is used as an exclamation, in isolation.


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Alexandra Goldburt
Local time: 04:22
English to Russian
+ ...
The word SKAFOOSKA is meaningless in Russian. Mar 4, 2009

It might mean something in some other Slavic language - I wouldn't know about that. But chances are, they just made it up for advertisement purposes - just as they made Siberia to be a dull, colorless place (I'm from there and I can assure you it's neither dull nor colorless!)

I hope it helps.


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Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:22
English to Arabic
+ ...
Swedish? Mar 4, 2009

A search for "skafuska" (different spelling) brings up a lot of Swedish sites mentioning "ska fuska" (2 words). Maybe you can post a Swedish>English Kudoz question, though I doubt it will have anything to do with the advert.

E.g "När ska hon fatta? svampen (våran engelskalärare) typ vill att vi ska fuska :S Vi gjorde engelskaprov i onsdags och idag hade vi hörövningen som vi då ...
lindakarin.blogg.se/


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Tatiana Lammers  Identity Verified
United States
Member (2008)
English to Russian
+ ...
SKAZKA? Mar 4, 2009

In Russian the word "skazka" (Rus. spelling сказка) means " fairy-tale".

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Amy Duncan  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 08:22
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Oooh, I'm so sick of that guy! Mar 5, 2009

I keep wondering when NET is going to come up with something new...arggh!
Anyway, I always thought he was saying something that sounds like "skavorska." I'm embarrassed because I studied Russian in college and can't remember a darned thing.


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Agnieszka Hayward
Poland
Local time: 13:22
German to Polish
+ ...
link to video Mar 5, 2009

Is it this one?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTL8Wc5CHXc&feature=related

No idea, what he means, just thought it might be easier to guess when more context is provided

have good day
Agnieszka


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 14:22
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Probably meaningless Mar 5, 2009

Sounds like the German in Chaplin's Dictator. The only Russian word I could recognise was "remont".
At least its not Swedish either.
Regards
Heinrich


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Taija Hyvönen
Finland
Local time: 14:22
Member (2008)
English to Finnish
+ ...
Swedish for "will cheat". Mar 5, 2009

Nesrin wrote:

A search for "skafuska" (different spelling) brings up a lot of Swedish sites mentioning "ska fuska" (2 words).


Not a likely name for a product.

Edit. Probably made up from zakuska, babushka etc. to give the commercial a Russian atmosphere.

[Edited at 2009-03-05 07:06 GMT]


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xxxEric Hahn  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 13:22
French to German
+ ...
Skavurzka (or Skavurska, Skavuska, Skavuzka) Mar 5, 2009

http://aprender-russo-online.blogspot.com/2008/01/skavurzka-skavurska-tem-algum.html

It's pure non-sense. But I like the russian colonel Boris Tutchenko (no russian surname) and his beautyful "stagiary"



[Edited at 2009-03-05 09:56 GMT]


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Oleg Delendyk
Ukraine
Local time: 14:22
English to Russian
+ ...
Agree Mar 5, 2009

Heinrich Pesch wrote:

Sounds like the German in Chaplin's Dictator. The only Russian word I could recognise was "remont".
At least its not Swedish either.
Regards
Heinrich


It is as Russian word as uniform and orders.


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Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:22
Member
Spanish to English
+ ...
The solution Mar 5, 2009

All my Russian went down the tubovich years ago, but now I've seen the video it's obvious. The translation to English is that well-known and difficult-to-spell exclamation PHWOOAAR! With the optional submeaning "don't get many of those to the pound".


Mervyn


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xxxEric Hahn  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 13:22
French to German
+ ...
PHOOAAR Mar 5, 2009

Oleg, do you confirm ?

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A_Fangrath  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:22
English to German
+ ...
Uniform and orders? Mar 5, 2009

Oleg,
what do you mean?


the word has no meaning in Russian,

an advert set in a siberian setting using this word?
does not make sense to me.

It's a compleate gibberish,

Please, et me know if I missed anything...






Oleg Delendyk wrote:

Heinrich Pesch wrote:

Sounds like the German in Chaplin's Dictator. The only Russian word I could recognise was "remont".
At least its not Swedish either.
Regards
Heinrich


It is as Russian word as uniform and orders.


[Edited at 2009-03-05 21:44 GMT]

[Edited at 2009-03-05 21:46 GMT]


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xxxEric Hahn  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 13:22
French to German
+ ...
And is this Russian, too ? Mar 5, 2009

http://videos.sport24.com/video/iLyROoafJQI5.html



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Alexandra Goldburt
Local time: 04:22
English to Russian
+ ...
No need to be embarrassed about it, Amy Mar 6, 2009

Amy Duncan wrote:
Anyway, I always thought he was saying something that sounds like "skavorska." I'm embarrassed because I studied Russian in college and can't remember a darned thing.


I studied German in school and college, and was even the best student in a class. Do I remember a darn thing?

NEIN!


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