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Off topic: Another one from the "Nigeria Connection", it seems
Thread poster: Steffen Pollex
Steffen Pollex  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:13
English to German
+ ...
Aug 27, 2003

FROM: MR DOMINIQUE BOGA DOUDOU.

KIND ATTN: SIR/MADAM.

THANK YOU VERY MUCH INDEED ACKNOWLEDGING THIS BUSINESS PROPOSAL, HAVING GOT YOUR CONTACT FROM A RELIABLE SOURCE, DESCRIBING YOU, AS A RELIABLE FOREIGN PARTNER, WHO HAVE GOOD BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE PUBLIC AND GOD FEARING.
I THEREFORE, DECIDED WRITING YOU IN ABSOLUTE CONFIDENCE PRIMARILY, SEEKING YOUR ASSISTANCE ON A POSSIBLE BUSINESS TRANSACTION WHICH I DO HOPE, IT WILL MEET YOU IN GOOD CONDITION AND IF GIVEN URGENT ATTENTION SHALL BE OF A POSSIBLE BENEFIT TO BOTH PATIES.

MY NAME IS: DOMINIQUE DOUDOU. SON TO THE EX-INTERIOR MINISTER OF COTE D' IVOIRE (IVORY COAST) HIS EXCELLENCY: MR EMILE BOGA DOUDOU. FROM THE WEST AFRICA. WHO WAS SHOT DEAD ON 19TH SEPTEMBER 2002. BY MULTINEER TROOP, FOLLOWING THE MILLITARY MUTINY IN MY COUNTRY.

I CONTACTED YOU, HENCES, MY NEED TO DEAL WITH PERSON WHOM MY FAMILY ASSOCIATES, HAVE HAD NO PERSONAL BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP, WITH. SINCE THE DEATH OF MY FATHER, I HAVE BEING SUBJECTED TO ALL KIND OF HARRASMENT AND INTIMIDATIONS WITH LOT OF NEGATIVES REPORTS EMANATING FROM THE GOVERNMENT AND THE PRESS ABOUT MY FAMILY.

THE EVIL ADMINISTRATION OF PRESIDENT LAURENT GBAGBO, HAS ALSO ENSURED THAT ALL OUR BANK ACCOUNTS FROZEN AND ASSETS BEING SEIZED. IT IS IN VIEW OF THIS, THAT I AM PLEADING FOR YOUR FULL CO-OPERATION AND ASSISTANCE AS BENEFICIARY, TO SECURE THE SUM OF : THIRTY TWO MILLION DOLLARS ($32.000,000.00) BEING THE VERY LAST OF MY FAMILY FUND IN MY POSSESION AND CONTROL.
MY ONLY HOPE NOW IS ON YOU AND THIS CASH, THAT WAS SECRETLY DEPOSITED BY MY FATHER IN MY FAVOUR, WITH A FINANCE SECURITIE FIRM IN AN UNDISCLOSE LOCATION WHERE THERE IS A BETTER POLITICAL PEACE AND ECONOMIC STABILITY, AS IF HE FORESAW THE LOOMING CRISIS IN MY COUNTRY. BUT AS SOON AS YOUR WILLINGNESS TO ASSIST ME, IS INDICATED IN THIS TRANSACTION THE COUNTRY SHALL BE MADE KNOWN TO YOU.

TO SHOW MY APPRECIATION FOR YOUR KIND ASSISTANCE IN THIS BUSINESS, 25% (TWENTY PERCENT) OF THE TOTAL SUM HAVE BEING GENEROUSLY SET ASIDE FOR YOU, 5% SET ASIDE FOR ANY EVENTUAL COST THAT MIGHT ARISE IN THE CAUSE OF THIS TRANSACTION, WHILE THE BANLANCE 70% IS TO BE INVESTED ON A VIABLE BUSINESS BY YOU, IN YOUR NAME AND COUNTRY, FOR ME AND MY FAMILY.
SHOULD YOU ARE INTERESTED IN THIS BUSINESS, I ONCE AGAIN PLEAD WITH YOU TO TREAT THIS ISSUE IN OUTERMOST SECRECY, STRICT CONFIDENTIALITY AND URGENCY, WITHOUT THE KNOWLEDGE OF ANY OTHER PARTY. I WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR EFFORT TO CONTACT ME VIA MY PRIVATE MAIL AS SOON AS YOU CAN.

E-MAIL:emileboga@netscape.net, or: bogadoudou@netscape.net

AS I WILL BE ACCESING MY PRIVATE MAIL ONLY. YOUR URGENT RESPONSE WILL BE APPRECIATED.

THANKING YOU AND GOD BLESSING IN ALL YOUR ENDEAVOUR.

MR DOMINIQUE.
F/FAMILY.


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Vladimir Stepanov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 10:13
English to Russian
+ ...
Absolutely! Aug 27, 2003

Yes, aren't you tired of such e-mails? They just never give up! I've had more than I would care to remember, but they are still coming!
I don't get the point of such "princes": what do they need our contact and banking details for?


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Thijs van Dorssen  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:13
Member (2002)
Dutch to German
+ ...
Mr. Doudou & friends Aug 27, 2003



FROM: MR DOMINIQUE BOGA DOUDOU.

THIRTY TWO MILLION DOLLARS ($32.000,000.00)

E-MAIL:emileboga@netscape.net, or: bogadoudou@netscape.net



Hi Steffen,

I get those kind offers from Mr. Boga Doudou and his friends all the time. At least once a week. Sometimes the amount is higher, sometimes lower. Every now and then, when I feel like it and when I have a little time I use an anonymous email address (like they do) to send him (or her) an answer. I give them the account number of the Red Cross. Sometimes they threaten to use voodoo on me. But they never send any money! (Hmm, I wonder why...)

The best thing to do is click on the email once to activate, then click on delete, goodbye Mr. Doudou!

Have a great day

[Edited at 2003-08-27 18:29]

[Edited at 2003-08-27 18:33]


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Wenke Geddert  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:13
Member (2004)
English to German
+ ...
... and similar ones Aug 27, 2003

Since June, I have received 12 similar emails (from Zibabwe, Senegal, Liberia, South Africa, Congo, Ivory Coast, and of course Nigeria)... It is getting very annoying. What do you do with those letters? I mean, obviously, disregard them - but is there a way to report them to authorities in order to investigate, etc.? (Apologies if this has already been discussed in another forum, but this entry has just triggered this off!)

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PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:13
English to Polish
+ ...
Used to collect 'em Aug 27, 2003

but got tired after something like the 50th variation on the theme.

The variables are: name, country, position, amount of money, reason for its availability, percentage cut offered.

Hey - we could all be rich so quickly... ;-D


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lien
Netherlands
Local time: 09:13
English to French
+ ...
I report them Aug 27, 2003

Wenke Geddert wrote:

Since June, I have received 12 similar emails (from Zibabwe, Senegal, Liberia, South Africa, Congo, Ivory Coast, and of course Nigeria)... It is getting very annoying. What do you do with those letters? I mean, obviously, disregard them - but is there a way to report them to authorities in order to investigate, etc.?


These letters are known by the name of "419 nigerian fraud letters". Many officials instanties in the world combat them.

I report them *everytimes* to the Web police and US secret service, here:
http://www.419fraud.com/419_contacts.htm

And, wonder, it has been a while now that I didn't get any of these letters.


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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:13
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Interesting link, lien... Aug 27, 2003



Good to know someone is doing something about it, and that large public institutions care about their reputation.


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Jeremy Smith  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:13
French to English
+ ...
Taking the anonymous replies one step further Aug 27, 2003

Continuing from one of the above replies, regarding replying to such a message from an anonymous e-mail, the people at Scamorama string the fraudsters along and document the results. Some of the stories are quite funny. A word of warning though: it might not be advisable to follow this site's example - these 419 scammers are very dangerous people. I can only echo the above advice: delete the messages as soon as you receive them.

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Monika Coulson  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:13
Member (2001)
English to Albanian
+ ...
Thank you for the link Aug 27, 2003

I did know that there was a way to report them. Thank you for telling us. However, I do not have time to do that for now. Their emails go straight to my Junk Folder and I just delete them in bulk
However, good to know that you can report things like this. Thanks again for the info.
Monika

lien wrote:

I report them *everytimes* to the Web police and US secret service, here:
http://www.419fraud.com/419_contacts.htm

And, wonder, it has been a while now that I didn't get any of these letters.


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Silvina Beatriz Codina  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 05:13
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
The scam works, I'm afraid Aug 27, 2003

The very first time I saw a Nigerian scam letter it was actually typewritten, back in the era of snail mail. It had been sent to a businessman who had an investment account abroad (back then the victim of choice). He did not speak English, so he gave me the letter to find out what it was about; afterwards he gave it to me as a memento. This happened several years ago, so you see the scam has been going on for a while. Amazingly enough, it has had such a long life because people actually fall for it. In fact, it seems the 419 Scam, as it is known, is no less than Nigeria's third largest source of income (!).

To find out more about the Nigerian scam, and other ways to part fools and their money, visit www.quatloos.com, where there is a wealth of materials about the 419, including an explanation of how the scam works (and how dangerous these wacky scammers actually are), a collection of letters (with 4790 specimens!), a series of letters written by some humorist who answered the letters, and was answered back by the scamsters, who apparently never suspected he was taking the piss, and (more to the point) several useful links to US government agencies and other agencies that may help scam victims or receive reports about the scam.

[Edited at 2003-08-27 16:28]


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swisstell
Italy
Local time: 09:13
German to English
+ ...
I reported the two I received to the FBI of my State Aug 27, 2003

since one alluded to a bank account in Florida.For whatever it is worth, authorities ought to be informed.

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lien
Netherlands
Local time: 09:13
English to French
+ ...
No, report them Aug 27, 2003

Jeremy Smith wrote:
I can only echo the above advice: delete the messages as soon as you receive them.


Otherwise, how do you want these people to do their jobs ? And NEVER, NEVER reply back.

It does not take very long to report: just view the full header, cut&paste, and cut&paste the message all in the body of the message. The header is very important.

Lien


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kbamert  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:13
French to German
+ ...
advance fee fraud Aug 27, 2003

cossack78 wrote:
what do they need our contact and banking details for?


Wednesday, May 22, 2002

NIGERIAN EMAIL FRAUD GANG NABBED
NEWSCRAWLER

By Drew Cullen
Posted: 05/22/2002 at 07:49 EST
South African police have arrested six West Africans, allegedly members of a 419 email fraud gang which is thought to have tried to con thousands of pounds out of their victims, according to this report.

Sometime in 1992/1993, I received my first airmail letter with a Nigerian stamp offering me a few million dollars, if only I would let the writer use my bank account to spirit money stolen from the government out of that huge, heroically corrupt country.

You'd think no-one would fall for the scam - known as a 419, after the relevant section of Nigeria's criminal code. But you'd be wrong: a few years ago, the Nigerian government placed ads in the FT, warning people not to be greedy and not to be suckers. If you got trapped, it was your own fault, so don't go running to the Nigerian government for your money back.

The scam, I thought, involved raiding my bank account.. Turns out it's a little more complicated - get your greedy victim to reply, and get the victim to travel abroad to another country, where he's vulnerable, and where the police don't care. And then get the victim to cough up money to facilitate the transaction. This is known as advance fee fraud, a common enough scam. But the Nigerians do it better than anyone else.

A variation on this theme is to hold aforesaid victim hostage until large sums of money are handed over. last year, a Nigerian gang lured a British businessman to South Africa and then held him for ransom. He escaped only because he was allowed to make a phone call and was able to alert his wife by speaking in his native Polish language.

The web site Crimes of Persuasion has several more examples of People held to ransom (scroll down a bit).

Over four or five years, I saw maybe eight 419 letters. These days I'm getting maybe two or three a week by email, both on my own account and from readers, purporting to come from Zimbabwe and Sierra Leone as well as from Nigeria.

The Nigerian government is trying to combat 419: you can do your bit by ignoring these ludicrous letters. ®

source:
http://www.nigeriannet.com/newsline/viewnews.cgi?category=3&id=1022089509


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Evert DELOOF-SYS  Identity Verified
Belgium
Local time: 09:13
Member
English to Dutch
+ ...
report, delete Aug 27, 2003

Thijs van Dorssen wrote:



FROM: MR DOMINIQUE BOGA DOUDOU.

THIRTY TWO MILLION DOLLARS ($32.000,000.00)

E-MAIL:emileboga@netscape.net, or: bogadoudou@netscape.net



Hi Steffen,

I get those kind offers from Mr. Boga Doudou and his friends all the time. At least once a week. Sometimes the amount is higher, sometimes lower. Every now, when I feel like it and when I have a little time I use an anonymous email address (like they do) to send him (or her) an answer. I give them the account number of the Red Cross. The answer is usually that they will use voodoo on me. (o: But they never send any money! (Hmm, I wonder why...)

The best thing to do is click on the email once to activate, then click on delete, goodbye Mr. Doudou!

Have a great day

[Edited at 2003-08-27 18:29]


or send them something like the following link:

http://j-walk.com/other/conf/index.htm


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invguy  Identity Verified
Bulgaria
Local time: 10:13
English to Bulgarian
That's right, they've been around for quite a while Aug 27, 2003

Silvina Beatriz Codina wrote:

The very first time I saw a Nigerian scam letter it was actually typewritten, back in the era of snail mail. It had been sent to a businessman who had an investment account abroad (back then the victim of choice).


The first one I saw was in the early 80s when I, having just received my uni degree, went to work at the Tech Info & Foreign Relations Dept. of a big machinebuilding company. The letter came with the incoming foreign mail - nice print, watermarked paper & all the jazz... I took it straight to the company's financial manager, he only took a glance at it, said "Yup, I know these" and dropped it in the trash can... You can imagine my face

Have in mind, I'm talking about (still communist then) Bulgaria... Indeed, those Nigerian (or whatever) folks are persistent, aren't they!

BTW a few months ago there was a British documentary about this on one of the local TV channels here. It was actually an interview with a British couple who got tricked and lost some 5,000+ pounds before realizing they were heading down the slope. They told the interviewer they had had some very convincing meetings with obviously well-educated, expensively clad African individuals, arriving in chauffeur-driven Mercs with diplomatic license plates etc.

In spite of all scam alerts, must still be a fairly profitable enterprise, that one...


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Another one from the "Nigeria Connection", it seems

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