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Off topic: It's Another New Year... Happy 2004
Thread poster: Maria Luisa Duarte

Maria Luisa Duarte  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:29
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Dec 31, 2003

"Happy New Year!" That greeting will be said and heard for at least the first couple of weeks as a new year gets under way. But the day celebrated as New Year's Day was not always January 1.

ANCIENT NEW YEARS
The celebration of the new year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, the Babylonian New Year began with the first New Moon (actually the first visible cresent) after the Vernal Equinox (first day of spring).

The beginning of spring is a logical time to start a new year. After all, it is the season of rebirth, of planting new crops, and of blossoming. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical nor agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary.

The Babylonian new year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year's Eve festivities pale in comparison.

The Romans continued to observe the new year in late March, but their calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun.

In order to set the calendar right, the Roman senate, in 153 BC, declared January 1 to be the beginning of the new year. But tampering continued until Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, established what has come to be known as the Julian Calendar. It again established January 1 as the new year. But in order to synchronize the calendar with the sun, Caesar had to let the previous year drag on for 445 days.

However, in AD 567 the Council of Tours abolished January first in favor of March as the start of a new year, varying the actual day to coincide with the Vernal Equinox. New Year celebrations lasted for several days. The first day of the new year was moved back to January 1 with the advent of the Gregorian Calendar by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582.

THE CHURCH'S VIEW OF NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS
Although in the first centuries AD the Romans continued celebrating the new year, the early Catholic Church condemned the festivities as paganism. But as Christianity became more widespread, the early church began having its own religious observances concurrently with many of the pagan celebrations, and New Year's Day was no different. New Years is still observed as the Feast of Christ's Circumcision by some denominations.
During the Middle Ages, the Church remained opposed to celebrating New Years. January 1 has been celebrated as a holiday by Western nations for only about the past 400 years.

FOR LUCK IN THE NEW YEAR
Traditionally, it was thought that one could affect the luck they would have throughout the coming year by what they did or ate on the first day of the year. For that reason, it has become common for folks to celebrate the first few minutes of a brand new year in the company of family and friends. Parties often last into the middle of the night after the ringing in of a new year. It was once believed that the first visitor on New Year's Day would bring either good luck or bad luck the rest of the year. It was particularly lucky if that visitor happened to be a tall dark-haired man.

Traditional New Year foods are also thought to bring luck. Many cultures believe that anything in the shape of a ring is good luck, because it symbolizes "coming full circle," completing a year's cycle. For that reason, the Dutch believe that eating donuts on New Year's Day will bring good fortune.

AULD LANG SYNE
The song, "Auld Lang Syne," is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English-speaking country in the world to bring in the new year. At least partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700's, it was first published in 1796 after Burns' death. Early variations of the song were sung prior to 1700 and inspired Burns to produce the modern rendition. An old Scotch tune, "Auld Lang Syne" literally means "old long ago," or simply, "the good old days."
Copyright © 1997-2004 by Jerry Wilson

I WISH ALL PROZ COLLEAGUES A VERY HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS 2004!

MLD


[Edited at 2003-12-31 11:59]


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Lamprini Kosma  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 13:29
English to Greek
+ ...
Thank you Maria Luisa! Dec 31, 2003

Maria Luisa Duarte wrote:



"Happy New Year!" That greeting will be said and heard for at least the first couple of weeks as a new year gets under way. But the day celebrated as New Year's Day was not always January 1.

ANCIENT NEW YEARS
The celebration of the new year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, the Babylonian New Year began with the first New Moon (actually the first visible cresent) after the Vernal Equinox (first day of spring).

The beginning of spring is a logical time to start a new year. After all, it is the season of rebirth, of planting new crops, and of blossoming. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical nor agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary.

The Babylonian new year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year's Eve festivities pale in comparison.

The Romans continued to observe the new year in late March, but their calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun.

In order to set the calendar right, the Roman senate, in 153 BC, declared January 1 to be the beginning of the new year. But tampering continued until Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, established what has come to be known as the Julian Calendar. It again established January 1 as the new year. But in order to synchronize the calendar with the sun, Caesar had to let the previous year drag on for 445 days.

However, in AD 567 the Council of Tours abolished January first in favor of March as the start of a new year, varying the actual day to coincide with the Vernal Equinox. New Year celebrations lasted for several days. The first day of the new year was moved back to January 1 with the advent of the Gregorian Calendar by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582.

THE CHURCH'S VIEW OF NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS
Although in the first centuries AD the Romans continued celebrating the new year, the early Catholic Church condemned the festivities as paganism. But as Christianity became more widespread, the early church began having its own religious observances concurrently with many of the pagan celebrations, and New Year's Day was no different. New Years is still observed as the Feast of Christ's Circumcision by some denominations.
During the Middle Ages, the Church remained opposed to celebrating New Years. January 1 has been celebrated as a holiday by Western nations for only about the past 400 years.

FOR LUCK IN THE NEW YEAR
Traditionally, it was thought that one could affect the luck they would have throughout the coming year by what they did or ate on the first day of the year. For that reason, it has become common for folks to celebrate the first few minutes of a brand new year in the company of family and friends. Parties often last into the middle of the night after the ringing in of a new year. It was once believed that the first visitor on New Year's Day would bring either good luck or bad luck the rest of the year. It was particularly lucky if that visitor happened to be a tall dark-haired man.

Traditional New Year foods are also thought to bring luck. Many cultures believe that anything in the shape of a ring is good luck, because it symbolizes "coming full circle," completing a year's cycle. For that reason, the Dutch believe that eating donuts on New Year's Day will bring good fortune.

AULD LANG SYNE
The song, "Auld Lang Syne," is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English-speaking country in the world to bring in the new year. At least partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700's, it was first published in 1796 after Burns' death. Early variations of the song were sung prior to 1700 and inspired Burns to produce the modern rendition. An old Scotch tune, "Auld Lang Syne" literally means "old long ago," or simply, "the good old days."

I WISH ALL PROZ COLLEAGUES A VERY HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS 2004!

MLD


Thank you Maria Luisa!

Warmest thoughts
and best wishes for a wonderful holiday and a very happy 2004 for all of you

Lamprini


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António Ribeiro  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:29
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Feliz Ano Novo Dec 31, 2003

Maria Luisa Duarte wrote:


I WISH ALL PROZ COLLEAGUES A VERY HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS 2004!

MLD


Aqui no Mar de Timor, estamos neste momento a 3 horas do fim do ano, e estou contente por estar a trabalhar.

O meu sincero desejo é que todos vós tenham um excelente ano de 2004 cheio de saúde, felicidades e... trabalho (infelizmente não nos podemos abstrair disto).

Obrigado por me terem "aturado" durante 2003.

António

PS. Excelente artigo, Maria Luisa. Obrigado.


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Magda Dziadosz  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 13:29
Member (2004)
English to Polish
+ ...
Happy New Year! Dec 31, 2003

...and thank you Maria Luisa

Magda


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Stephanie Mitchel  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:29
French to English
Auld lang syne... Dec 31, 2003

... and many happy returns to all my ProZ colleagues and especially my KudoZ pinch-hitters for coming through for me so consistently in 2003. I hope to return the favor in 2004.

Stephanie


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Valeria Verona  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 08:29
Member (2003)
English to Spanish
+ ...
New Year Wishes Dec 31, 2003

My best wishes for this coming year.
Best of luck!!
Valeria


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Henk Peelen  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 13:29
Member (2002)
German to Dutch
+ ...
Best wishes for 2004 Dec 31, 2003

http://www.riversongs.com/Flas/sunrise.html

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Romina Minucci
Italy
Local time: 13:29
English to Italian
+ ...
cheers!! Dec 31, 2003

my best wishes from Florence for a wonderful 2004!

Have a great night!!

Romina


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juanjorque

Local time: 13:29
Spanish to French
+ ...
bonne année Dec 31, 2003

Thanks You Maria for your history.
I'm in Copenhaguen now and I hope that tonight I will danse some salsa!
For those who are alreadyy in the new year, bonne fêtes à tous!
juan


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Ines Garcia Botana  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:29
Member
English to Spanish
+ ...
Thank you María Luisa Dec 31, 2003

[quote]Maria Luisa Duarte wrote:


"Happy New Year!" That greeting will be said and heard for at least the first couple of weeks as a new year gets under way. But the day celebrated as New Year's Day was not always January 1.



Thank you for the article and Happy New Year for you, too!


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Eva T
English to Albanian
+ ...
Happy New Year 2004 Dec 31, 2003

to everyone!
Eva


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nettranslatorde
Member
Russian to German
+ ...
I would like to join Jan 1, 2004

... and wish all ProZ members a happy, healthy and busy New Year!

Best regards,
Kerstin


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Monika Coulson  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:29
Member (2001)
English to Albanian
+ ...
Thank you and... Jan 2, 2004

Happy New Year 2004!
May this year be filled with happiness, peace, good health, celebrations and reasons to celebrate!
Monika


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