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Thread poster: Robert INGLEDEW

Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:35
English to Spanish
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Feb 10, 2004

THE ANGEL FALLS (VENEZUELA)

Some months ago I posted a forum entitled ARGENTINA, A PARADISE FOR BARBGAIN-SEEKERS, since I believe that at this time Argentina offers by far the very best deal for foreign tourists. You can find my forum on Argentina in English: http://www.proz.com/topic/12361
or in Spanish (with more information)
"Visitar Argentina, la gran oportunidad", in the first page of the Spanish forum:
http://www.proz.com/topic/5246

However, Latin America and the Caribbean have nearly 40 countries in total, and with the exception of a couple of them, which I will not mention, all have incredible beauties and challenges for the tourist.

During nine years I was the Latin America Field Representative of The Gideons International, travelling 200 days a year out of Argentina and supervising 34 countries including Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. You may imagine that during 1800 days of travel I visited many places (I missed some of them, however, like Punta Cana in Dominican Republic. being only 20 miles away, but with a lot of work to do), but this gives me an experience and knowledge of the whole area that I would like to share with you.

Venezuela is an expensive country just now, a 3-star hotel that used to cost only ten US Dollars per night fifteen years ago, now is costing 130 US Dollars per night. But if money is not a problem, I am sure you will enjoy this one:

http://www.venezuelatuya.com/gransabana/eng.htm

http://www.aerialfocus.com/angelfalls.html

I had the privilege of overflying the Angel Falls, the highest waterfall in the world, nearly 1000 meters or 3300 feet high, on a one-day tour from Canaima, another place that is worthwhile visiting.. There is an expedition by land from Canaima that takes 4 days navigating the rivers of the area, but I did not have time to go on that one.

Venezuela is a tropical country on the Caribbean and has many beautiful places to see: The Andes, the coastal foothills (mountains about 3000 feet tall covered by tropical forests falling into the sea...with clear water, white sand and palm trees by the seaside) I will mention Mérida in the Andes, Playa Colorada on the sea between Puerto La Cruz and Cumaná, and Colonia Tovar, a Swiss settlement in the mountains. But we will talk about these places later on in this forum.

Please feel free to share the beauties you have visited in Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean in this forum, so that all of us may enjoy them.

Regards from Mar del Plata, the Miami Beach of Argentina.


Robert Ingledew


[Edited at 2004-02-12 13:15]

[Edited at 2005-01-31 10:57]


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Baruch Avidar  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 05:35
English to Hebrew
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My Venezuelan experience Feb 10, 2004

In 1982 I visited Venezuela during 11 unforgetable days.
Among other sites I was in Caracas, the Carabobo park, Margarita island, overflied tha Angel falls and spent two days navigating the rivers of the Canaima region (the Caroní with its falls and lagoons, indian villages in the middle of the jungle, etc.), Merida and Jojí at Adinian area and the desertic Maracaibo area.
Anything Robert describes gives by a glance only a pale idea to this spectacular country where a visit becomes as I said, unforgetable.


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Csaba Ban  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 04:35
Member (2002)
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on Argentina and The Gideons Feb 10, 2004

Argentina is one of my big travel plans. Although usually seen as much less exotic than Brazil or Peru or Bolivia, my curiosity for the country was awaken by its people: A few times I had the chance to talk to Argentinians and their approach to the world (more precisely their "Weltanschuung") is surprisingly close to that of Central Europeans. (very much "European" or "Western" in their hearts and aspirations, but sadly realizing that they - as we - are living on the periphery of the Occidental core).

One of the most cherished book on my bookshelf is a gilt (or so it looks) Bible, "placed by the Gideons". My late grandfather em... took it from a hotel room around 1970 and somehow it found its way to me... I especially liked one verse that is translated into dozens of languages in the beginning of the book, my first exposure to "exotic" scripts and languages such as Tamil, Icelandic, etc.


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Bruce Capelle  Identity Verified
Spain
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Member (2003)
Spanish to French
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Punta Cana Feb 10, 2004

You may imagine that during 1800 days of travel I visited many places (I missed some of them, however, like Punta Cana in Dominican Republic. being only 20 miles away, but with a lot of work to do), but this gives me an experience and knowledge of the whole area that I would like to share with you.

It's not too late for you to discover Punta Cana. After Santo Domingo last week, we're organizing the second Dominican PowWow in Cabarete on Friday. It leaves you a couple of days to pack and catch a plane!

Bruce


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Eugenia Rodriguez
United States
Local time: 22:35
Spanish to English
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If you want to go to paradise… Feb 10, 2004

... go to Los Roques in Venezuela. This is a group of islands (Keys) located 100 miles north of Caracas in the Caribbean Sea. It has crystal clear waters and pure white sands. There are no luxuries for it is more like an ecotourism destination. You stay in Posadas and as far as I know there is only one with air conditioning. You could also stay on sailboats. If you go there, you have to go scuba diving (if you don't know how to, you can take a course there). The locals are very kind and there are also some Europeans that say they fell in love with it and stayed. Truly, that is paradise…

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Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:35
English to Spanish
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YOU ARE RIGHT, BARUCH Feb 10, 2004

Baruch Avidar wrote:

Anything Robert describes gives by a glance only a pale idea to this spectacular country where a visit becomes as I said, unforgetable.


You are completely right, Baruch. I enjoyed very much every single visit to Venezuela, from Río Caribe to Maracaibo and from La Guaira to San Cristobal. It is a beautiful country, and worthwhile visiting.


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Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:35
English to Spanish
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I AGREE COMPLETELY WITH YOU Feb 10, 2004

[quote]Csaba Ban wrote:

A few times I had the chance to talk to Argentinians and their approach to the world (more precisely their "Weltanschuung") is surprisingly close to that of Central Europeans. (very much "European" or "Western" in their hearts and aspirations, but sadly realizing that they - as we - are living on the periphery of the Occidental core).

Argentina is a cosmopolitan country, with a very high percentage of the population of European extraction, mostly Spanish and Italian.

But there are also other large communities: Jewish (the third community of the world lives in Buenos Aires), German, British, Japanese, Korean... you name them, there they are...

At this time, you might want to have a look at my photo album of Argentina, which does not cover all its beauties, but gives you an idea on what you can see:

http://groups.msn.com/argentinapaismaravilloso/fotosderobertoingledew.msnw

And the city of Buenos Aires resembles the style of Paris, in the opinion of many.

But what you will like most in Argentina are the low prices, specially in Mar del Plata, Bariloche, Córdoba and Salta... not so much in Puerto Madryn, El Calafate and Ushuaia, where prices are 3 times higher, but still affordable...

I suppose you have read my forum on Argentina, so I don´t want to promote the country here, at least for the time being... I intend to write articles on Peru, Mexico, the Caribbean, and many other areas.

Thank you for your comments.

Robert Ingledew

[Edited at 2004-02-10 21:29]


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Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:35
English to Spanish
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I WOULD LIKE TO, BUT CANNOT AFFORD IT JUST NOW Feb 10, 2004

Bruce Capelle wrote:

It's not too late for you to discover Punta Cana. After Santo Domingo last week, we're organizing the second Dominican PowWow in Cabarete on Friday. It leaves you a couple of days to pack and catch a plane!

Bruce


I would like to go, but have not had too much work this year. Just now I am planning a trip to Ushuaia, Calafate and Puerto Madryn, and that alone will cost me some 400 Dollars for a 10-day tour, staying at Hostelling International, or I would have to spend more.

I know that Punta Cana is a beautiful place. Why don´t you post some nice photos of Punta Cana and other areas of your country, like La Romana, Puerto Plata, etc. in this forum? All of us would enjoy it...

Regards from Mar del Plata, Argentina


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Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:35
English to Spanish
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SACSAYHUAMAN (CUSCO, PERU), AN INCREDIBLE FORTRESS CONSTRUCTED BY THE INCAS Feb 10, 2004

I feel so encouraged about the number of people that have read this forum in half a day, that I will go ahead and place my second article today. I am speaking about Sacsayhuaman, very near Cusco and not too far from Machu Pichu, Perú.

Within the tourist destinations of Perú, Cusco is one of the most known, because it is a beautiful colonial city, and because it is the door to Machu Pichu, to which we will refer in a future posting.

Less known, but far more impressive, is the Sacsayhuaman fortress, only 2 miles away from the center of city of Cusco. It is a triple defensive line in zigzag constructed with rocks weighing some 500 tones each (20 ft x 30 ft x 20 ft) welded to each other when cement did not exist and placed one on top of another (something that would be impossible even with today´s technology, but that the Incas were able to do). Something as mysterious as the mohairs in Easter Island (Chile).

Here is the fortress:


http://members.tripod.com/~texcolca1/krgstone1.html



Enjoy it.



Robert Ingledew


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Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:35
English to Spanish
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YOU ARE RIGHT, EUGENIA Feb 10, 2004

Eugenia Rodriguez wrote:

... go to Los Roques in Venezuela.
... Truly, that is paradise…


I have never been to Los Roques, but have heard a lot about its beauty. Maybe the best thing I can do is give all of you the link to this paradise on earth, where you will see some beautiful photos:

http://www.venezuelatuya.com/losroques/eng.htm

I am sure you will enjoy it.

Regards from Argentina.


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Marocas  Identity Verified
Venezuela
Local time: 22:35
Member (2004)
English to Spanish
¡Que orgullo! Feb 10, 2004

Robert, Baruch y Eugenia:

No tienen idea del orgullo que siento como venezolana al leer los comentarios que ustedes hacen sobre mi país. Siempre es agradable escuchar cosas buenas y tienen razón, los lugares que mencionan son increíbles y hay muchos más. Coincido con Eugenia en sus comentarios sobre Los Roques como uno de mis sitios favoritos. Realmente es increíble. La mayoría de las posadas ahora tienen aire acondicionado y si van, asegúrense de llevar un buen cargamento de protector solar. Créanme, lo van a necesitar. No hay palabras para describir Canaima y la Gran Sabana - otro paisaje y otro entorno. Simplemente hay que ir y ver. Hay otros lugares como la sabana del estado Apure, el Río Orinoco desde el Estado Bolívar y el Estado Amazonas, Los Andes con su gente tranquila, que vive en otro mundo, y las montañas que parecen no tener fin. Pudiera enumerarles miles de pequeños lugares que he tenido la suerte de conocer paseando por carretera y sin tener ningún plan organizado. Sin embargo, lo mejor de todo (y, por favor, no me consideren pedante) es la gente que uno encuentra en todos esos lugares. Para nosotros los citadinos, es difícil entender tanta generosidad y la capacidad de compartir, no importa que sea con extraños. Cuando en un pueblito invitan a un viajero a una casa de familia, sin conocerlo, es simplemente para compartir lo que ellos tienen, así sea sólo un café en una tacita descascarada. Para ellos es un placer hacerlo.

Me permito compartir con ustedes este artículo que recibí de mi país. Omito la parte referente a la situación política porque no me parece apropiada para este foro, pero si les interesa, me pueden contactar y con gusto les enviaré el artículo completo.

De nuevo, gracias por sus comentarios.

--------------
VENEZUELA

Por Juan Manuel de PRADA, ABC Madrid, sábado 8 de noviembre 2003

CREO que fue Madariaga quien aseveró que un español que no conoce His­panoamérica sólo es español a medias. En estos días en que recorro, un poco a matacaballo, este inabarcable continente,presentando mi novela La Vida Invisible, he tenido oportunidades sobradas de corroborar -de sentir- la verdad de esta afirmación. Y en ningún lugar de forma tan vívida como en Venezuela. En los venezolanos he descubierto una efusión cordial, una hos­pitalidad ferviente y sincera que me ha deslumbrado. Los europeos hemos desarrollado un trato social demasiado regido por el protocolo y el artificio, demasiado amedrentado y tiquismiquis. Uno
llega a Venezuela y, de repente, todas esas reservas que, presuntuosamente, consideramos un avance de la urbanidad se desmoronan: existe tal desprendimiento, tal entrega sin amba­ges, tal afluencia de afectos en estas gentes por las que circula nuestra mis­ma sangre que uno siente como si se hubiera desembarazado de una hoja­rasca de impedimentos que avejentan su espíritu, para entregarse a senti­mientos que creía hibernados a perpetuidad. Ha sido una experiencia alboro­zada, lustral, que me ha confirmado que hasta hoy sólo he sido un español demediado.

Venezuela no atraviesa su mejor coyuntura histórica....Pero es precisamente esta penuria inmerecida lo que resalta, por contraste, el talante generoso de sus gentes, su capacidad para seguir mirando el futuro de frente, aun en medio de tantos avisos de derrum­be. Nunca como en Venezuela había descubierto tanta curiosidad intelectual, tanto afán abnegado por responder a la fatalidad con una sonrisa, tanta be­lleza y simpatía floreciendo por doquier, aun en medio del infortunio. Allá donde uno posa la vista, descubre un país apretado de vida, tumultuoso de pasiones que sólo necesitan una mecha para prenderse. Para un español, es una lección y un homenaje descubrir que su semilla dejó aquí, en esta sucur­sal del paraíso, tan hermosos ejemplos de humanidad.

Durante mi breve estancia en Caracas he tenido ocasión de asomarme, si­quiera mínimamente, a los pozos de tragedia que
socavan este país llamado a más altos designios; y desde aquí quiero agradecérselo a quienes han sido mis anfitriones y cicerones: la editora María Elena Rodríguez, el escritor Ós­car Marcano, la empresaria periodística Mayra Capriles, el consejero cultural de la embajada española Gonzalo Fournier.
.....
Pero este pueblo sobrevivirá a sus gobernantes catastróficos y a sus
empre­sarios rapaces. Tanta vitalidad, tanto anhelo de mejora no pueden obtener como único resultado el acabamiento.

Venezuela resucitará; y España tendrá que estar ahí, respaldando ese resurgimiento
sin pedir nada a cambio. Por­que el único modo de ser españoles completos consiste en ser un poco ve­nezolanos, en contagiarse de esa generosidad que no les cabe en el pecho.

-----------
Acabo de darme cuenta que estaba pensando en inglés pero escribí en español. Eso fue la emoción, pero ¡qué bueno que ustedes también hablan español!


[Edited at 2004-02-11 00:18]

[Edited at 2004-02-11 01:47]


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Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:35
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MUCHAS GRACIAS, MAROCAS, POR TUS COMENTARIOS Feb 11, 2004

[quote]Marocas wrote:

Robert, Baruch y Eugenia:

No tienen idea del orgullo que siento como venezolana al leer los comentarios que ustedes hacen sobre mi país.

Y te cuento un secreto: hace unos 20 años atrás estuve a punto de radicarme en Mérida. Pero como conseguir la residencia no era un tema sencillo, desistí.

La ciudad de Mérida no sólo tiene bellos paisajes, su gente es de una calidez y calidad muy especial.

Roberto

THANK YOU, MAROCAS, FOR YOUR COMMENTS

[quote]Marocas wrote:

Robert, Baruch and Eugenia:

You have no idea how proud I feel as a Venezuelan reading the comments you make on my country.

And Robert Ingledew answers: I will tell you a secret: some twenty years ago I nearly settled down in the city of Merida. But to obtain the residence was no easy deal, so I gave up the idea.

The city of Merida has not only beautiful sceneries, its people are warm and of a very special human quality.

Roberto



[Edited at 2004-02-11 12:26]


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Marocas  Identity Verified
Venezuela
Local time: 22:35
Member (2004)
English to Spanish
and did you eat... Feb 11, 2004

Robert:

And did you eat "pizca andina" (an andean soup; some write "pizca" and others write "pisca", so there is no consensus on the spelling of this word), "pastelito andino" (a small fried wheat pocket with beef, potatoes,and rice inside), "arepita de trigo" (wheat arepa [Venezuelan bread, but made of wheat flour and not of corn flour as in the rest of the country]),queso ahumado (smoked cheese)and "dulces abrillantados" (glazed candies)?


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Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:35
English to Spanish
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I USED TO TRAVEL TO 34 COUNTRIES AND ATE MOSTLY INTERNATIONAL FOOD Feb 11, 2004

I did eat arepas many times, and some sort of stew that was delicious, but I am not sure if it was Venezuelan, or not. What I really enjoyed in Venezuela was the large variety of fresh fruit juices, "tamarindo", "mango" and "patilla" (mostly known as sandía in other parts). At that time you could only find apple juice in Argentina... fortunately times have changed and now you find any type of juice also here.

I remember that in Venezuela there was also a delicious brand of fruit juice (Frica) And the "El Peñón" coffee was delicious and non-expensive; at that time, you could buy an ounce of coffee for half a dollar. However, I understand that things are far more expensive now.

Well, I have to be fair with other countries, and my next note will be on Uruguay.

Regards from Mar del Plata, Argentina.


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Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:35
English to Spanish
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PUNTA DEL ESTE, URUGUAY, THE MEETING PLACE OF LATIN AMERICAN PRESIDENTS Feb 11, 2004

Presidents always look for the most beautiful places to meet, and they go often to Punta del Este to hold their meetings.

This is not by chance: Punta del Este has a beautiful combination of beaches, forests and many other attractions. Just have a glance at these photos, and you will understand what I am talking about.

Montevideo is also a very nice city, and has some nice beaches at Pocitos and Carrasco, and all the way from Montevideo to Punta del Este (an hour and a half by bus) you will find very nice places, including Carrasco, Atlántida, Pinamar, Piriápolis and Punta Ballena.

Have a look at the photos, and enjoy your next trip to Uruguay, which is not as expensive as it used to be:

http://www.visit-uruguay.com/photogallery.htm

http://www.stonek.com/ppedeleing.htm

Regards from Argentina


Robert Ingledew


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