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Off topic: What don't you miss about your home country?
Thread poster: Krokodil
Krokodil
Germany
Local time: 23:02
German to English
+ ...
Jul 5, 2004

Following on from a topic in the German section "What do you miss (about your home country)?" I thought I'd start one on the opposite subject.

Having lived about half my life in Germany and been spoiled for choice when it comes to bakery products, I can say with absolute conviction that I do not miss soggy British white "bread" (sliced or otherwise).

I don't care for Sunday trading either. I wouldn't call myself particularly religious, but I think it's great that, despite repeated media rumblings, it hasn't been able to establish itself here. It's reassuring to know that, even in such a consumption-oriented country, consumerism at least lies reasonably dormant for one day in the week.

I'd be interested to read further comments!

Croc


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TRADL
France
Local time: 23:02
English to French
+ ...
living in the UK, from France Jul 5, 2004

I smiled at your posting and thought I'd reply. I've now been in the UK for almost 3 years and I get quite a shock when I go back to France and go shopping be it in a shop or supermarket. I now think service is pretty bad. Checkout operators are rude etc. It's just not the same manners as in Britain. Loads of stuff now annoy me when I'm in France. It's quite bad really. Unlike you, I miss Sunday trading. Shops are even sometimes not open Mondays in France and it's really bothering me coz I have forgotten all these little details of everyday life that do matter when you're there. On the other hand, I miss bakeries and good chocolate (rocher Suchard anyone?) and and and...I'm going there to stock up soon so it's OK!

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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 23:02
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Driving on the left! Jul 5, 2004

I'm basicly fairly happy here in Denmark after 26 years, and there is almost everything I want in both places (well, apart from things like a 36-hour day and 5-day weekends...)

But I don't dare drive back home, and it annoys me intensely. As long as I can pay my way out of it and go by bus or tube, even walk, or get some member of the family to drive, it's not a real problem. But I don't see any solution either!

And as for the weather... When the Brits have finished with it, they send it straight over here! If it isn't wet enough, it picks up the moisture it can over the North Sea/Vesterhavet.

I'm going home to see the family next week and can't wait!

Have a good summer as they say over here... between thunderstorms!

[Edited at 2004-07-06 06:48]


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xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 23:02
French to English
+ ...
answer : NOTHING ! Jul 5, 2004

As a Brit who has lived more than half my life in France (and now occasionally Belgium), I find that there is absolutely nothing that I miss about the UK. It is true that in France I cannot get BBC TV but I can in Belgium, so... I admit I miss my oldest friends but since they come and visit or we meet up in other countries, that's no big deal! By contrast, when in Belgium, there are many things I miss about France like Sunday trading which I find a Godsend (or is that a contradiction in terms?). When you work 5 days a week at least 12 hours a day, to have a whole weekend when you can actually get things done is wonderful.
What I like about France is the pace. Elsewhere (including the UK) things are so dreafully slow. I even like the legendary French rudeness which saves the hypocrisy of having to pretend (and you can even shout back!). I like the cut and thrust driving (though that's been tamed by those killjoys of politicians). In all, there is no way I could ever go back "home". Fortunately I'm married to someone who feels exactly the same way.
Yet I know people who have been at least 10 years in France and who slot back into UK life as though they had never been away. It takes all sorts to make a world!


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xxxSanmar
Local time: 22:02
English to Dutch
+ ...
Dutch living in UK Jul 5, 2004

What I miss least about Holland is the ridiculous bureaucracy. I give an example: a couple of years ago (before I had a mobile phone) I went into a Dutch post office to make a phone call to a friend. It was one of those systems whereby you don't have to use a phone card or coins. The person behind the counter has a clock/timer of some sorts and tells you afterwards how much you owe them. I make the phone call and walk out and only realise the next day (when I pass the same post office) that I did in fact forget to pay the post office for the call. I return to the post office to pay - speak to the same person as the day before - and am told that 'yes, they know I walked out without paying but it is too late to pay now since they have already drawn up a special report about the non-payment which they have sent off to head office. We are talking about a 50 cent phone call here! Not to mention things such as having to register with a new local authority every time you move house, not being able to rent properties where the rent does not correspond to your income (i.e. if you have a high income you can only rent expensive properties etc.). Nor do I miss not being able to get away from the crowds very easily (of course, this only applies if you live in the Randstad area of the Netherlands).
Having said all this, there are also plenty of things that I DO miss but that is another thread, I believe.


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Elizabeth Adams  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:02
Member (2002)
Russian to English
+ ...
american living in russia Jul 5, 2004

i don't miss:
1. gas stations and pawn shops on every corner
2. going to the mall or the movies every time you want to get out of the house
3. people who invite you over "to watch TV" (it happens, I swear!)
4. having to get some insane bureaucrat to authorize my doctor to treat me
5. when the bagger at the grocery store puts each item into two (2) bags to make you feel loved

things i won't miss about Russia when we go back home for summer vacation:
1. elevators (which double as smoking rooms and toilets for starters)
2. having the hot water turned off for a month in the summer "just because"
3. riding around in stinky shuttle buses with suicidal drivers
4. hiding the fact that my tooth/arm/head/whatever hurts because I am sick of people telling me to put iodine/vodka/honey/whatever on it
5. having to scream at the cashier in the grocery store to get enough bags to carry my food home


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Henk Peelen  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 23:02
Member (2002)
German to Dutch
+ ...
Anything Jul 5, 2004

Krokodil wrote:

What don't you miss about your home country?
Croc


I don't miss anything, so I miss nothing, because I'm living in my home country.

Bye bye from Holland

[Edited at 2004-07-05 16:23]


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xxxsarahl
Local time: 14:02
English to French
+ ...
Parisian in the midwest Jul 5, 2004

I certainly don't miss the pollution, the noise, crowded subways and lines everywhere: the post office, the supermarket check-outs, you name it.
Bureaucracy is another thing I can live without.


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Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 15:02
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
The rain, rain and more rain. Jul 5, 2004

I am Dutch, have lived in sunny western Canada for 40 years.

Apart from the rain, I don't miss:
the crowds
the noise
the traffic
the graffiti
windy train stations
the fact that everyone knows it better and is quick to tell you so

Having said that, there are as many things that I do miss.

The thing is that when in Holland, I feel like a Canadian but when in Canada, I will always be Dutch.


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Dinny  Identity Verified
Greece
Local time: 00:02
Italian to Danish
+ ...
Living in Italy you don't miss Denmark at all! ;-) Jul 5, 2004

I admit, one has to "get used" to live in Italy. It takes up most of you patience every day - but it's worth it!

What I DON'T miss about Denmark is:

- my income tax return form granting me a "discount" of two percent since I ought to pay 70 percent of my income, but the top limit is set to 68 percent.

- the weather (which has for the last three weeks been hopelessly stuck on "rain, 14-17 degrees")

- the FAT food

- being unable to buy a car because the 380 percent tax on the new car price makes it impossible for me to afford it from the 30 percent left on my wages.

- the mentality: "don't think you're somebody". (Even if you are, don't EVER dare make anybody notice it in any way)


I miss my daugther, thoug... and my grandson. Sigh!



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Henk Peelen  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 23:02
Member (2002)
German to Dutch
+ ...
Wind and rain?? Wooooww!!! Jul 5, 2004

Tina Vonhof wrote:

I am Dutch, have lived in sunny western Canada for 40 years.

Apart from the rain, I don't miss:
the crowds
the noise
the traffic
the graffiti
windy train stations
the fact that everyone knows it better and is quick to tell you so

Having said that, there are as many things that I do miss.



Sorry Tina, but there's no better thing than cycling on a Dutch dike, in a downpour against force 5. It strengthens your constitution and makes you cheeky as one could be, so you'd understand that the wind and rain were made to let you feel that Holland is made by wind and rain.

Compared to Holland, Canada is so easy and the people are sooo gentle, friendly, polite and blasé, that they seem more or less lazy to a Dutchmen. They seem to have found paradise instead of hunting for it.
But cycling is still great in Canada, even bigger than in Holland, despite of the lacking rain and wind.

Waidaminute ... there's a glimmer of hope:
Tina Vonhof wrote:

The thing is that when in Holland, I feel like a Canadian but when in Canada, I will always be Dutch.


Undoubtedly, you're still a Dutchmen, coz you feel a little different than your bystanders.


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Fabiana Papastefani-Pezzoni  Identity Verified
Romania
Local time: 00:02
Member (2003)
English to Albanian
+ ...
Albanian living in Ukraine Jul 5, 2004

Borned in Albania (in a half Italian and half Albanian family) found it very easy to get used in Italy. When I moved to Italy I didn't miss a lot of things (I still don't) like:
1. Burocracy;
2. No elecrticity & water for several hours during the day; etc.

Now I live in Ukraine.

Elizabeth Adams wrote:
things i won't miss about Russia when we go back home for summer vacation:
1. elevators (which double as smoking rooms and toilets for starters)
2. having the hot water turned off for a month in the summer "just because"
3. riding around in stinky shuttle buses with suicidal drivers
4. hiding the fact that my tooth/arm/head/whatever hurts because I am sick of people telling me to put iodine/vodka/honey/whatever on it
5. having to scream at the cashier in the grocery store to get enough bags to carry my food home


I laughed when I red Elizabeth's posting (do we live in the same town?). All the time I go back to Italy
I do not miss the same things Elizabeth was not missing, adding only the wired driving.

Enjoy a lot the culturural life here though, besides the parks and good restaurants.

Fabiana


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lien
Netherlands
Local time: 23:02
English to French
+ ...
French living in the netherlands Jul 5, 2004

What I don't miss about france is the feeling that everything that is not expressly allowed is forbidden.

The terrible hierarchy everywhere.

I do not miss either that you cannot walk alone in the streets without being ennoyed by men whistling or trying to talk to you, very persistent. Here I can go everywhere by myself, it doesn't matter if you are a man or a woman.

The profound social conflit between the bosses and the workers, the boss is always the enemy there.

You can't believe how free you feel here.

What do I miss about france ? Le fromage de tete, les pieds de cochons panes, les rillettes, les tripes, un beefsteack dans l'araignee, la saucisse de Morteaux, le saucisson de Lyon, le saucisson a l'ail, les grande forets domaniales, des fois des trucs en pente. Sinon, rien. ;D

[Edited at 2004-07-05 23:41]


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Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 23:02
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
I'm taking a "break" back home in Scotland right now... Jul 5, 2004

I'm taking a "break" back in Scotland right now, and it has rained EVERY SINGLE DAY since I've been over here. Raining so hard you can't even open your windows coz it rains in. And diving outside every 10 minutes to get the washing in. No, to hang it out again coz the rain's stopped. No, gotta go and get it back in again - it's raining.....

Not to mention the shoddy building standards (no match on those good solid German houses). And the beer. Almost the only good stuff over here is imported.

But those are only minor things. Scotland has changed a lot since I left - 12 years ago now. And I think it has changed for the better.

Would I move back here? Dunno - I'd be closer to my folks, but could I REALLY deal with the weather?


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Natalya Zelikova  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 00:02
Member (2003)
English to Russian
+ ...
... Jul 5, 2004

Elizabeth Adams wrote:

things i won't miss about Russia when we go back home for summer vacation:
1. elevators (which double as smoking rooms and toilets for starters)
2. having the hot water turned off for a month in the summer "just because"
...
4. hiding the fact that my tooth/arm/head/whatever hurts because I am sick of people telling me to put iodine/vodka/honey/whatever on it


)

Currently living in my home country - Ukraine, but won't miss the same things, if I manage to work in another country.


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