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Off topic: Does homesickness ever go away?
Thread poster: paula13

paula13  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 22:36
Member (2005)
Jul 11, 2005

I have lived in Buenos Aires, Argentina for the past four years and I love it here. I think it's one of the most beautiful cities in the world. Work is great, I have made wonderful friends, the food is amazing... I mean it really is a great place to live, but I still get really homesick sometimes.
I grew up in Sunny Southern California, and I really miss it from time to time. Does that feeling ever go away? Are there more people like me out there who love their new country but miss their old home?


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Rosa Maria Duenas Rios  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:36
I don't think so... Jul 11, 2005

I was born and raised in Mexico City. At 35 I moved to Montreal, Canada; then back to Mexico City, then to Washington DC, then to Sao Paulo, Brazil, now I am back in DC, and I will be going back to Mexico City soon. Some days, I miss places, people, and food from Mexico so much, that it almost hurts; other times, I miss Montreal and its snow (believe it or not!), and even though I just left Sao Paulo, I already miss the neighbourhood where I lived, the caipirinhas, and the special warmness of Brazilian people! And I believe the longer you have lived in a place, the more you will miss it; I am afraid there is no cure for it, but I'd dare to say I almost enjoy it (maybe I am a bit masochistic), since it means that such places and people have left an imprint in our hearts/souls and, after all, they bring us sweet memories... my two cents...

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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 20:36
French to Spanish
+ ...
Never! Jul 11, 2005

Born in Brussels, catalan mother, french studies, lived in Belgium, Cuba, Switzerland, France, Spain, and now Mexico... I always have to go back to my motherlands... Catalonia and France, that is. Go back to yours everytime you can. I really got homesick after 15 years not going back: now, I do go over there every two years, at least. I pour some tears, shure, see friends and family, walk on those streets where I was raised, eat my favorite meals and drink the drinks... and come back to my home as a brand new man!

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swisstell
Italy
Local time: 03:36
German to English
+ ...
The world is my oyster Jul 11, 2005

I've lived in Switzerland (both the German and the French speaking parts) Spain, the Philippines, Italy, Japan, Panama, Jamaica and the USA (NJ and FL), have a French wife, an Italian son-in-law, a Colombian daugther-in-law, worked and travelled extensively around the world. I am often being asked whether I don't miss the mountains of my native Switzerland, here in flat Florida. My answer usually is that if I am in the mountains, I might miss the beaches or if I cannot ski, I can golf (without exaggeration right in my own backyard). Homesick? No way. The world can be beautiful most anywhere if you have the right attitude, good friends and are happy with whatever work is yours. It helps to be able to undertake a nostalgic trip ever so often (and Cataluña, France, Italy and Switzerland are on the program this fall.) It certainly helps to have a gorgeous climate with plenty of sunshine, as is the case here. So after
taking in the crisp mountain air, it is always good to be back
HOME and home is where .... see above.


[Edited at 2005-07-11 22:52]

[Edited at 2005-07-11 23:12]


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Kathinka van de Griendt  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:36
Member (2004)
German to English
+ ...
Always! Jul 12, 2005

I grew up in South Africa, but have lived in Germany for 18 years. I always, always pined for smiling people, sunshine, the air and the South African food until it hurt and the longest spell between visits "home" was 10 years. I mentioned my homesickness in one of the forums about a year ago and a South African translator said (and so did SwissTell): "As a translator, my dear, the world is your oyster". Now I fly over at least once a year, take my laptop with me and gorge on South Africa. Literally. No more pining for me!
Regards to all, Kathinka


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Arthur Allmendinger  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:36
English to German
+ ...
Do you miss old friends or places? Jul 12, 2005

paula arturo wrote:

I have lived in Buenos Aires, Argentina for the past four years and I love it here. I think it's one of the most beautiful cities in the world. Work is great, I have made wonderful friends, the food is amazing... I mean it really is a great place to live, but I still get really homesick sometimes.
I grew up in Sunny Southern California, and I really miss it from time to time. Does that feeling ever go away? Are there more people like me out there who love their new country but miss their old home?


Hi Paula,

I grew up in the former SU but have lived the last 15 years of my life in Germany.

I have never really missed the place of my birth. All my friends and my family members also left the former SU and live now in Germany. My children grew up in Germany and they cannot remember their birthplace.

I think that nostalgia means missing friends or relatives, but not places or landscapes.



[Edited at 2005-07-12 15:13]


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xxxsarahl
Local time: 18:36
English to French
+ ...
Home is where I hang my hat! Jul 12, 2005

I have lived all over the place like a lot of people here, and while I miss some specific things about the other places, I am fine in my -usually temporary!-hometown.

The US is culturally diverse so it's probably a good place to be for multicultural types anyway.


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Alan Johnson  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:36
German to English
Don't count on it! Jul 12, 2005

I left home in 1976, as a young lad, really. I've been here, there, and everywhere, but have spent most of the past 28 years in Germany. I still get homesick. However, when I'm there, I'd rather be somewhere else. That's 'cos Papa was a Rollin' Stone and Mama was a Gypsy Rose. Paula, you have to learn to live with it. And you will, eventually.

[Edited at 2005-07-12 07:47]


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xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 03:36
French to English
+ ...
Not everyone gets homesick - where's home anyway? Jul 12, 2005

I left my "home" country 30 years ago and I have lived in a number of other countries since, mostly in France. If I am honest, I have to say that I never, ever feel homesick for the UK. I have been living partly in Belgium for the past 5 years and what I miss is France, not my original country. When London got the 2012 Olympics, many of my friends called to congratulate me (?!) but I was thoroughly cheesed off because "we" i.e. Paris had lost out! Go figure!

Changing country is a bit more difficult than moving to another town but the end result is much the same: you have to make new friends and find a slot for yourself in your new place of residence. I remember leaving home to go off to university....

One of the reasons I don't feel homesick is that I have no close family in the UK any more, only a few in-laws and that is not the same at all! Also I have put down roots in France. But basically I think my lack of homesickness is because I am attached to people more than places and that home is where the heart is.

We're all different but sometimes "homesickness" is just another way of saying "the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence". Enjoy what you have, go back from time to time and enjoy that too but don't confuse good memories with the idea that something may be missing in your life. It will only hold you back!


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Gillian Searl  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:36
Member (2004)
German to English
Last time I lived in Germany Jul 12, 2005

(which was for 3 years) I found myself talking about "home" as the other place. So if I was in Germany home was the UK and if I was in the UK home was Germany - one day I realised how sad that was and decided an attitude change was needed. This time round (I've been back in Germany for 18 months now) I feel more at home - though there are some things I miss. Yesterday evening I fancied a Chinese takeaway and although we have Chinese restaurants here it's just not the same - not to mention a decent Indian. I always miss people more than places but once you have lived abroad you don't entirely fit in back in your original country either - too many experiences make you stand out and change your opinions. So then I guess you don't reall fit in anywhere any more - you have to make your own home wherever you are.

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Benno Groeneveld  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:36
English to Dutch
+ ...
When people hear I was born Jul 12, 2005

in the Netherlands, they often ask me how often I go home. To which my reply is: every night, to my home in St. Paul, MN. I go "over there" every other year or so.

When I first moved to New York, I went "home" to Amsterdam and after a few weeks, went back "home" to New York. After a few years, home became where the heart is: the house where I live with my (American) wife and (American-Dutch son.

Although the ties to the Old Country do bind: I put off becoming an American citizen until they changed the law in Holland, allowing a Dutch national to keep his or her Dutch passport if you take the nationality of your spouse.

Benno


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flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 03:36
Spanish to Italian
+ ...
Half and half... Jul 13, 2005

Hello there

I was born in northern Italy, and lived there until I was 11. Then we all moved to Spain (that is, my parents, my brother and I) - and that's my home now.

Sometimes I miss my homeland, the food, my grandmother, my aunts... the first time we moved, we didn't go back to visit for 9 years (!), but now I have already came back to visit in April.

It is a strange situation. If you ask me, I feel like a Spaniard-adopted Italian. If I could, I would declare myself half Spaniard half Italian. I just love this country, and, to be sincere, I would never go back to Italy to live...

Spain, at least here, is much better for long-term living. At least that's my two cent opinion

Love,
Flavio


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paula13  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 22:36
Member (2005)
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks everyone!!!!!!! Jul 16, 2005

Everyone,
I'm really glad to hear I'm not the only one who gets homesick from time to time. Those of you who asked where home is reminded me of something I once read, I think it was Herman Hesse who wrote, "Home is neither here nor there, home is where the heart is or it is nowhere at all."
When our friends, family, and fondest memories are scattered throghout the world, it's hard to keep track of the pieces of our hearts that got lost somewhere in between.
I guess no matter how much it can hurt from time to time we can count on our mememories to take us back to where we're from and our new friends and experiences to take us wherever it is we're headed... and I'm eager to see where life will take me! So maybe it's time to let go of what used to be home and give a big piece of my heart to this new country that has welcomed me so warmly and all the kind people in it that help make it feel more and more like home every day!
Thank you all for sharing your experiences. Those of you who are not so happy in your new place, I hope you can call it home someday too.

Sincerely,
Paula


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