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Off topic: Do you celebrate \"Children\'s day\" ?
Thread poster: Claudia Iglesias

Claudia Iglesias  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 00:14
Member (2002)
Spanish to French
+ ...
Aug 3, 2002

I had heard about it and it was always to defend children\'s rights.

But in Chile, where I live since one year, it\'s going to be tomorrow and my children ask me what I\'m going to buy for them. I told them that this was a creation similar to mom\'s day or dad\'s day, just to make people buy presents and go to the restaurant and that I wouldn\'t follow such a custom. I also told them that I consider Christmas as the day for them.

But I had to accept to take them to a restaurant they enjoy. Imagine which one ?

I looked in Google to read something about this and I discovered at least 3 different dates for the \"International Children\'s Day\", so that makes me wonder :

How do you consider it : is it for defending children\'s rights or to give presents ?

When is it ?

What do you think about this ?



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Elvira Stoianov  Identity Verified
Luxembourg
Local time: 05:14
German to Romanian
+ ...
it's June 1st Aug 3, 2002

as far as I know, June 1st is the international Children\'s Day. At least I thought so, before you made this post. Anyway, we celebrate it on June 1st, but nothing special happens (maybe there are more cartoons)

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maciejm  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 05:14
Partial member (2011)
English to Polish
+ ...
Of course I do Aug 3, 2002

In Poland the Children\'s Day is June 1st, too and since I was born on June 1st, I remember receiving 2 presents, one being a birthday present and the other the present for the Children\'s Day, when I was a child myself.

Nowadays in my family we also remember to buy some toy or other for our son on that date.

Best wishes,

Maciek


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Eleonora Hantzsch  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:14
English to Spanish
+ ...
In Argentina, it's the second sunday in August. Aug 3, 2002

When I was a child, it was celebrated on the first sunday of August, but it has changed a few years ago.

But, as you said, it has nothing to do with children\'s rights, it\'s just like mother\'s or father\'s day. There are usually lots of \"special\" activities to do on that day, such as theatre plays, festivals, puppets...usually overcrowded, and it is also usual to buy them presents. I agree that these \"days\" are mostly commercial events, but, you can skip the presents and perhaps enjoy a good day out with the family anyway.



Cheers to your children!


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sevinc altincekic  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:14
English to Turkish
+ ...
In Turkey it is April 23 Aug 3, 2002

We celebrate the Children\'s Day differently. It is also the day when the Turkish Parliament has been opened for the first time in history, that is April 23, 1924. The Children\'s Day is a present by our founder Ataturk to the children. Besides commemorating the opening of the parliament, it reminds us each year that the world we live in is actually not ours but our children\'s. On that day each governmental institution is symbolically governed by children, they comment on how they would like to rule the state, the institutions, etc. All over the country festivities are performed by school children in their schools, in public areas, stadiums etc. where they display their abilities, to which since some years children from other countries also participate, so the cultural communication among different nations is also fostered.

One more thing it is an official holiday, so Turkey as a whole celebrates it.



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xxxOso
Spanish
+ ...
In México, it's on April 30th ¶:^) Aug 3, 2002

Hola Claudia,



I found a webbie which gives these dates for some Latinoamerican countries:



Colombia- April 3rd 

México- April 30th 

Paraguay- May 31st

Venezuela- 3rd Sunday of June

Uruguay- August 9th

Chile -2nd Sunday of August

Perú- 3rd Sunday of August

Brasil- October 12th 



Then they give November 20th as the International Children\'s Day.



http://www.me.gov.ar/efeme/diadelninio/



My opinion: If you have kids, every day is Children\'s Day.



Oso ¶:^)







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Yelena.  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:14
English to Russian
+ ...
In Russia Aug 3, 2002

June 1st is the International Children\'s Day but it\'s not a public holiday or anything and it\'s not taken seriously by children as far as I know...

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Linda Young
Local time: 05:14
French to English
+ ...
South Africa is different Aug 3, 2002

International Childrens day in South Africa has nothing to do with receiving presents, rather we give them. For instance in supermarkets there would be huge trolleys where we would buy extra sweets or sodas or food and put them in the trolleys, and these would be distributed to hospitals and orphanages. On this day, a lot of families go to orphanages and take a child out for the day, and spoil them, by going to a fun fair, or restaurant, and actually a lot of families end up by taking the same child out during holidays as well, and they become part of the family, and in some instances they get adopted (which is wonderful). The motto for International Childrens Day is \"have you hugged your child today?\". I guess in a way it is a day that makes parents realise that due to our very stressful way of living we can slow down and take notice of and pay attentin to our children.

Regards

Linda


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Lydia Molea  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 05:14
English to German
+ ...
June 1st Aug 3, 2002

In Romania it is June 1st, I remember always having to draw stuff at school and memorize poems for the \"international\" children\'s day. However, in Germany, there seems to be no children\'s day. I don\'t remember getting presents though, maybe some sweets.

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jerraine
Local time: 21:14
Chinese to English
+ ...
National KidsDay Aug 4, 2002

This is a new thing that started last year here in the US. In 2001, the U.S. Conference of Mayors, an official nonpartisan organization of 1,139 cities with populations of 30,000 or more, passed a resolution proclaiming National KidsDay as the first Sunday in August. Here is the address to the National KidsDay official website.There are many useful resources for parents.



http://www.kidsday.net/home.asp



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Csaba Ban  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 05:14
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Hungary Aug 4, 2002

In Hungary, \"children\'s day\" is celebrated on the last Sunday of May. (The first Sunday of May is Mothers\' day).

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Claudia Iglesias  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 00:14
Member (2002)
Spanish to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks, it has been very interesting Aug 4, 2002

Now I think here we\'re copying US new custom (just like Halloween), but may be we\'d better copy Turkey or South Africa.



Anyway I agree with Oso, Children\'s day should be every day, but it\'s useful sometimes to remind us that we have to break a routine in which every one is in its world, to be together. I didn\'t want to follow into the commercial system, so (or but) we went out yesterday and after the restaurant we spent the afternoon in a gameplace.

The most important thing was that we were together.


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Craig Hills
Local time: 12:14
German to English
+ ...
May 5th, Childrens Day in Japan Aug 5, 2002

The fifth, day of the fifth, month, has been celebrated in China and Japan since ancient times, and since it was made a national holiday in 1948, May 5th in Japan, is \"Children\'s Day\" and brings the reminder that one of the nation\'s greatest assets is her children. The day is used to stress the importance of respecting the character of children and promoting their health, and happiness. It is also the day for children to express their gratitude for the tender love and care they receive from their parents.



Girls are the guests of their brothers on this occasion just as boys are guests of their sisters on the occasion of the Girls\' Festival on March 3rd. Children\'s Day was traditionally a celebration for boys, corresponding to the Doll Festival for girls. Ceremonies and parties are observed throughout the country in which the children are wished happiness and prosperity.



No one knows for sure when the observation of the Tango-no-Sekku began but some historians trace it to an ancient rural Chinese custom, (Sechie), in which the royal guards wore ceremonial helmets and carried bows and arrows, which became popular at the Japanese court during the days of the Empress Regnant Suiko, (593-629 AD). One legend relates that the festival is a branch of a custom practiced by farmers in May, the time when insects begin to appear to harm the young plants. The farmers tried to drive the insects away by frightening them with bright banners and grotesque figures. Later, these figures came to represent warriors famed for their fighting power. As the Musha-Ningyo, (warrior dolls), became more artistic, they were gradually displayed indoors, not to scare away insects but to remind the young boys of the family of manliness and to ward off evil spirits.



Another legend traces the origin of the Boys\' Festival to Tokimune Hojo\'s victory over them invading Mongols on May 5, 1282, where Samurai families erected the flags and streamers in celebration. Others believe that the unification of the country by the Ashikaga Shogun in the 14th century had been celebrated in this fashion on every May 5 until the interior decorations came to be emphasised.



In the modern observance of Tango-no-Sekku, a display is arranged in the tokonoma, (or alcove), in the guest rooms of Japanese houses. Among the decorations are a miniature helmet, (kabuto), suits of armour, (musha-ningyo), a sword a bow and arrow, silk banners bearing the family crest and the warrior dolls which represent Kintaro, (a Herculean boy who grew up to be a general; Shoki, an ancient Chinese general believed to protect people from devils; and Momotaro, the Japanese equivalent to David who slew Goliath), to which they offer boiled rice cakes, (chimaki), wrapped in bamboo or iris leaves and mochi wrapped in oak leaves, (kashiwamochi). The oak and bamboo, again symbolise strength and a successful life.



Shobu, the Japanese iris, the long narrow leaf of which is somewhat like a sword in shape, has always been closely associated with the Boys\' Festival. The iris leaf is prominent in the observance of Tango-no-Sekku because the sound of the word Shobu, although written with different characters, implies striving for success. On May 5, the Japanese steep the leaves in hot water and enjoy the fragrant Shobu-yu, (iris hot-bath), because of the traditional belief that the iris bath has miraculous medicinal values that protects against all kinds of illnesses. Many public bath houses, particularly in the districts where the people are less affected by western influence and are accustomed to taking hot baths in the morning, open their doors early in the mornings of May 4 and 5.



Also for the festival, finely chopped iris leaves are mixed with Sake to produce a drink, (Shobu-sake), especially enjoyed by the Samurai of old. In ancient times, iris leaves were also believed to have the mysterious power of extinguishing fire and for this reason, in rural areas today, people still observe the custom of putting iris leaves on the eaves of their houses on May 5 as a talisman against the possible outbreak of a fire or presence of evil spirits.



People raise brightly coloured and well decorated paper and cloth carp, Koinobori. Together with long red and white ribbons, the carp are hoisted on a bamboo pole, mounted by a pair of gilded pinwheels, high above the rooftops. A carp is flown for each son in the family, a very large one for the eldest, the others ranging down in size.

The carp has become the symbol of the Boys\' Festival because the Japanese consider it the most spirited of fish, so full of energy and power that it can fight its way up swift-running streams and cascades. Because of its strength and determination to overcome all obstacles, it stands for courage and the ability to attain high goals. The carp is thus an appropriate symbol to encourage manliness and the overcoming of life\'s difficulties leading to consequent success.


[addsig]


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Craig Hills
Local time: 12:14
German to English
+ ...
May 5th, Childrens Day in Japan Aug 5, 2002

The fifth, day of the fifth, month, has been celebrated in China and Japan since ancient times, and since it was made a national holiday in 1948, May 5th in Japan, is \"Children\'s Day\" and brings the reminder that one of the nation\'s greatest assets is her children. The day is used to stress the importance of respecting the character of children and promoting their health, and happiness. It is also the day for children to express their gratitude for the tender love and care they receive from their parents.



Girls are the guests of their brothers on this occasion just as boys are guests of their sisters on the occasion of the Girls\' Festival on March 3rd. Children\'s Day was traditionally a celebration for boys, corresponding to the Doll Festival for girls. Ceremonies and parties are observed throughout the country in which the children are wished happiness and prosperity.



No one knows for sure when the observation of the Tango-no-Sekku began but some historians trace it to an ancient rural Chinese custom, (Sechie), in which the royal guards wore ceremonial helmets and carried bows and arrows, which became popular at the Japanese court during the days of the Empress Regnant Suiko, (593-629 AD). One legend relates that the festival is a branch of a custom practiced by farmers in May, the time when insects begin to appear to harm the young plants. The farmers tried to drive the insects away by frightening them with bright banners and grotesque figures. Later, these figures came to represent warriors famed for their fighting power. As the Musha-Ningyo, (warrior dolls), became more artistic, they were gradually displayed indoors, not to scare away insects but to remind the young boys of the family of manliness and to ward off evil spirits.

Another legend traces the origin of the Boys\' Festival to Tokimune Hojo\'s victory over them invading Mongols on May 5, 1282, where Samurai families erected the flags and streamers in celebration. Others believe that the unification of the country by the Ashikaga Shogun in the 14th century had been celebrated in this fashion on every May 5 until the interior decorations came to be emphasised.



In the modern observance of Tango-no-Sekku, a display is arranged in the tokonoma, (or alcove), in the guest rooms of Japanese houses. Among the decorations are a miniature helmet, (kabuto), suits of armour, (musha-ningyo), a sword a bow and arrow, silk banners bearing the family crest and the warrior dolls which represent Kintaro, (a Herculean boy who grew up to be a general; Shoki, an ancient Chinese general believed to protect people from devils; and Momotaro, the Japanese equivalent to David who slew Goliath), to which they offer boiled rice cakes, (chimaki), wrapped in bamboo or iris leaves and mochi wrapped in oak leaves, (kashiwamochi). The oak and bamboo, again symbolise strength and a successful life.



Shobu, the Japanese iris, the long narrow leaf of which is somewhat like a sword in shape, has always been closely associated with the Boys\' Festival. The iris leaf is prominent in the observance of Tango-no-Sekku because the sound of the word Shobu, although written with different characters, implies striving for success. On May 5, the Japanese steep the leaves in hot water and enjoy the fragrant Shobu-yu, (iris hot-bath), because of the traditional belief that the iris bath has miraculous medicinal values that protects against all kinds of illnesses. Many public bath houses, particularly in the districts where the people are less affected by western influence and are accustomed to taking hot baths in the morning, open their doors early in the mornings of May 4 and 5.



Also for the festival, finely chopped iris leaves are mixed with Sake to produce a drink, (Shobu-sake), especially enjoyed by the Samurai of old. In ancient times, iris leaves were also believed to have the mysterious power of extinguishing fire and for this reason, in rural areas today, people still observe the custom of putting iris leaves on the eaves of their houses on May 5 as a talisman against the possible outbreak of a fire or presence of evil spirits.



People raise brightly coloured and well decorated paper and cloth carp, Koinobori. Together with long red and white ribbons, the carp are hoisted on a bamboo pole, mounted by a pair of gilded pinwheels, high above the rooftops. A carp is flown for each son in the family, a very large one for the eldest, the others ranging down in size.

The carp has become the symbol of the Boys\' Festival because the Japanese consider it the most spirited of fish, so full of energy and power that it can fight its way up swift-running streams and cascades. Because of its strength and determination to overcome all obstacles, it stands for courage and the ability to attain high goals. The carp is thus an appropriate symbol to encourage manliness and the overcoming of life\'s difficulties leading to consequent success.
[addsig]


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