Off topic: Summer Trip to Europe - Tips Requested
Thread poster: Dyran Altenburg
Dyran Altenburg  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:04
English to Spanish
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May 22, 2006

Our kids' highschool band will be touring some European countries this summer: France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland.

Tips in general appreciated, particularly regarding "must try" street vendor food.

Thanks!

--
Dyran


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Woodstock  Identity Verified
Germany
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Could you be a little more specific? May 22, 2006

I think you would get a better response if you could mention a few details, such as:

- Cities the band plans to visit, because there are regional specialities, like "Weißwurst" in Bavaria

-The age of the band members

-The dates, as there are loads of summer activities, festivals, fairs, and similar that might be fun and free (at least no admission fees)


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Dyran Altenburg  Identity Verified
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A few more details May 22, 2006

Thanks for the answer, Woodstock.

Here are some more details about the trip:

Dates: July 3 - 19
Ages: 14-19

Cities:
Caen, Bayeux, Paris, Strasbourg, Riquewihr, Rothenburg, Dinkelsbühl, Dachau, Westendorf, Rattenberg, Salzburg, Engleberg, Lucerne, Colman, (last day in Europa Park).

The only time they would be eating on their own is at lunch.

No alcohol consumption is allowed on the trip.

--
Dyran

[Editado a las 2006-05-22 19:04]


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Woodstock  Identity Verified
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Currywurst und Pommes in Germany May 22, 2006

Sausage (beef and/or pork - I'm not sure, because I don't eat meat) from a grill, covered with "Currysosse" (ketchup with a dash of curry powder) and fries (pommes frites). This is always a bit hit with Germans, but I'm not sure if the American kids will go for the German "ketchup", which tastes very different than Heinz in the US. Probably one kid should buy one and let the others try it, otherwise there's sausage without the sauce. This they can get from street vendors anywhere in Germany. Also "Brötchen" (crusty rolls) with cheese or different kinds of sliced sausage, ham, etc. can be bought in train stations and cafes. They're like a sub sandwich.

There's also McDonald's, but quite a bit more expensive and a somewhat different menu than they would be used to (regional tastes and all that). In fact, all the major fast food chains are around, if they get desperate.

They should be warned that in smaller towns stores often close over lunch (12:30 or 1 pm to 2 or 2:30), so get their food before then, if they just want to try different goodies from bakeries (the old "point-and-pay" method). Vendors don't take a lunch break!

The websites for the towns are often in English and would list events. In Germany - It sounds as if they're hitting small, picturesque places with cute houses and not much else. Dachau, of course, will be pretty depressing, but an important history lesson they won't forget.

Some schools will still be in session at that time, maybe a visit could be organized to one or two so the German kids can practice their English.





[Edited at 2006-05-22 18:47]


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Dyran Altenburg  Identity Verified
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Thank you! May 22, 2006

Thanks, Woodstock.

This is exactly the type of information I was looking for.



--
Dyran


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xxxsarahl
Local time: 08:04
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Lunch in France May 22, 2006

Bakeries usually sell sandwiches and salads around lunch time. Look for a bakery near a high school, they're probably the best option for your needs.

Also, as lunch is the main meal of the day in France, a number of bars serve inexpensive lunches, look for the special of the day.

HTH


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Thierry LOTTE  Identity Verified
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Lunches in Europe May 22, 2006

In case of any kind of problems (exotic/poisoned European foods in Europe) it is always possible to eat at Mc Donalds : you will find the same Bigmac or doble cheeseburger in London, Paris, Genève, Wien... or in Bangkok in the Patpong area.
The only problem is in Hamburg : they, roughly, pretend that they invented the Hamburger... As a consequence, it is almos impossible to travel dowtown without find several dozens of snack-bars pretending that this is "the" place where the "hamburger" have been invented and offered to the free world...
In case of stomach problems (Paris, Vienna, London or elsewhere) please apply to the next American Hospital :there are many and are highly trained to remedy to these kind of problems...

One more thing you should know : compared to U.S.A, food is quite expensive in Europe. For the price of a good french sanwich in Paris (Ham+butter+baguette) + a Coke taken at the "Terasse" of a "Café" in Paris you get a full meal in States (and, if you are lucky, a good one...).

Another thing you should know (for sure, the State secretary for European Tourism will most certainly not hire me to promote the biw) is that the foreign exchange rate is not very favorable for the time being : One USD equal to roughly 1 Euro and 30 cents...

Hope that the hereavocecomments will not discurage you to pay us a visit...


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Dyran Altenburg  Identity Verified
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Thank you! May 22, 2006

Thanks for the info, Sarah.



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Dyran


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Dyran Altenburg  Identity Verified
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Thank you! May 22, 2006

Thanks for the info.

I guess I should have mentioned that MickyD's type food will not be allowed. Apparently, more stomach discomfort has been experienced by previous band travelers eating there than with street vendors. Go figure.

Also, the group travels with their own doctor and registered nurse, just in case.

Regarding the exchange rate, we realize it will not be an inexpensive trip, but we think it will be well worth the effort.



--
Dyran
(whose kids were raised with home-cooked English, Spanish, and Mexican cuisine)


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Thierry LOTTE  Identity Verified
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Great ! May 22, 2006

Dyran said :



Also, the group travels with their own doctor and registered nurse, just in case.



Thank you Dyran ! Great sense of humour : I was a little bit afraid that you might have taken my posting as some kind of attempt of American bashing...

Strongly do hope that you will enjoy your stay in Europe.


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xxxsarahl
Local time: 08:04
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Street vendors May 22, 2006

You'll be in France in the summer so you'll probably see a lot of carts in the streets selling all kinds of food. I strongly recommend the crêpes, they fix them while you wait. Don't worry if the kids buy cidre to wash them down, cidre is only 6% proof.

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Jalapeno
Local time: 17:04
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Salzburg May 23, 2006

They should try and finde some "Käsekrainer" in Salzburg, a type of sausage with bits of cheese in it. Sold by some street vendors, but might not be *that* easy to find.

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Yolande Haneder  Identity Verified
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Käsekrainer - not so sure May 23, 2006

Jalapeno wrote:

They should try and finde some "Käsekrainer" in Salzburg, a type of sausage with bits of cheese in it. Sold by some street vendors, but might not be *that* easy to find.


I am not sure about the "Käsekrainer", as far as I know it takes quite a long time to be ready and it is quite fat. I am not findig it so easily on the streets.
In Austria (at least where I am), you can find on the street "Langos" (as far as I remember it is from Hungary - some kind of potatoes "pancake, quite quick and easy to eat, "Bratwurst" (usually what you are at least finding - white saussage) and "Schnitzel" "Schitzelburger" (schnitzel was usually the favorite austrian food before - according to the last research it had been taken over by italian food.

A lot of bakeries (especially "Anker" have sandwiches and things to eat on the way).


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French Foodie  Identity Verified
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French street food May 23, 2006

sarahl wrote:

You'll be in France in the summer so you'll probably see a lot of carts in the streets selling all kinds of food. I strongly recommend the crêpes, they fix them while you wait. Don't worry if the kids buy cidre to wash them down, cidre is only 6% proof.


Yup, the crepes are great and it's fun to watch them being made. Other stands have waffles, or croque monsieur (toasted ham sandwich with melted cheese on top).
There are also chip wagons that sell hilarious combo sandwiches (the kids might get a kick out of the fact that any sandwich - sausage, ground beef, chicken, etc. - dubbed an "Americain" has the fries IN the sandwich).
I quite like the thin-crust pizza you can often buy from roadside trucks by the slice or whole, and of course the bakeries have a wide variety of sandwiches available in freshly baked baguettes. Yum! (can you tell it's lunchtime here?)
Any town of a reasonable size will be sure to have a selection of lebanese restaurants that often have open windows onto the street where you can buy a falafel or kabob to take away.
Hope this helps!


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Dyran Altenburg  Identity Verified
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Thanks again to everyone for their tips May 24, 2006



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Dyran


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