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Off topic: different terms for money
Thread poster: yolanda Speece
yolanda Speece  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:04
English to Spanish
+ ...
Nov 13, 2006

I know that in a lot of ways money makes the world go round.

I have heard a lot of different terms for money such as "plata", lana", chavos. What term do people use to refer to money in your country?

This is just for our fun!


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biankonera  Identity Verified
Latvia
Local time: 18:04
Italian to Latvian
+ ...
in my native language.. Nov 13, 2006

..we call money "nauda" (oficially), yet if one wants to use a more familiar approach so to speak, there are words like
"piķis",
"skanošais",
"kāposts",
"laši",
"sīcene",
"lielais rublis".

Stella

ps: thats Latvian

[Edited at 2006-11-14 14:04]


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Alfredo Tutino  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:04
English to Italian
+ ...
so many ways Nov 13, 2006

in Italian, "soldi" e "denaro" (or "danaro") are the most common correct word; but then there are also (among many others, some gergal, some more or less dialectal):

grana, palanche, svanziche, piccioli, conquibus, dindi, moneta...

I'll stop here; but I am reminded of Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli - the very great poet who wrote marvellous sonnets in Roman dialect in the early XIX century.

He wrote one whole sonnet using only (some of) the words used to name the male sexual organ, and then another for the female one; I'm not aware of any sonnet made up only of Italian words meaning money, but I wouldn't be surprised to find one...

[Edited at 2006-11-13 21:26]

[Edited at 2006-11-13 22:52]


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Olivia MAHÉ  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 17:04
English to French
+ ...
In French Nov 13, 2006

We say (officially) argent... but also fric, blé, thune, sous... slang is quite "rich" on this point...

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Marina Soldati  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 12:04
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
In Argentina Nov 13, 2006

Hi,

Besides "dinero" and "plata" it´s also called "guita" and sometimes "morlacos".

Greetings,
Marina


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Teresa Bento  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 16:04
Member
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Em português Nov 13, 2006

We've "massa", "papel", "guito", "marfim","grana" (if you live in Brazil)...

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Agnieszka Hayward
Poland
Local time: 17:04
German to Polish
+ ...
Polish Nov 13, 2006

in Polish, the official word is pieniądze,

the colloquial ways of referring to money include:

forsa,
kapusta,
mamona,
szmal,
kaska,
kasa,
gotówka,
sałata, papier (to my knowledge mostly referring to USD),

to name a few.

Curiously enough as many as 2 of the above are also names of vegetables

kapusta - cabbage
sałata - lettuce

Wishing you all a lot of it!


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Marcela Mestre  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 12:04
English to Spanish
more Nov 14, 2006

Marina Soldati wrote:

Besides "dinero" and "plata" it´s also called "guita" and sometimes "morlacos".


And besides those, "mango", "cobre" and "sope" in the expression "No tengo un ...", meaning "I've run out of money".

Best!
mm


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Romina Berardi
Argentina
Local time: 12:04
English to Spanish
+ ...
One more... Nov 14, 2006

Marcela Mestre wrote:

Marina Soldati wrote:

Besides "dinero" and "plata" it´s also called "guita" and sometimes "morlacos".


And besides those, "mango", "cobre" and "sope" in the expression "No tengo un ...", meaning "I've run out of money".

Best!
mm


I can think of "tarasca" right now, although it's quite vulgar

[Edited at 2006-11-14 02:14]


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Solfrid Lokslid  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:04
Member (2006)
English to Norwegian
+ ...
Nowegian Nov 14, 2006

In Norwegian we say "penger". A more slang term would be "spenn".

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yolanda Speece  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:04
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
This is exactly what I am talking about Nov 14, 2006

Please keep submitting. I think this is great. I also like the fact that it is in more than one language, too.

This is for fun so keep them coming!


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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 11:04
English to French
+ ...
In Canadian French Nov 14, 2006

I don't know why but over here, people use terms related to food - maybe because we can buy food with money?

The two most popular ones are wheat and bacon. There is also other terms, like brown, because a 100$ bill in Canada is brown. We also sometimes refer to red, because 50$ bills are red. But the most popular ones always are wheat and bacon.



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Natalia Zudaire  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 12:04
English to Spanish
+ ...
Argentina v 2.0 Nov 14, 2006

Marina Soldati wrote:
Besides "dinero" and "plata" it´s also called "guita" and sometimes "morlacos".


Don't forget "mangos" (as in "no tengo ni un mango").

N.


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Language Aide Pvt. Ltd. - Translation & Interpreting Agency
India
Local time: 20:34
English to Hindi
+ ...
in Hindi Nov 14, 2006

The exact and widely used word for money in Hindi is -

Rupia, or, Rupaya (रुपया)

other few less used words are:

Dravya (द्रव्य)
Dhan (धन)
Rokad (रोकड़)
Nagad (नकद)
Sikka (सिक्का)
Paisa (पैसा)
Mudra (मुद्रा) etc.

Vivek Raj
Language Aide,
India


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A.Đapo  Identity Verified
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Local time: 17:04
Partial member (2007)
English to Serbo-Croat
+ ...
Bosnian Nov 14, 2006

Official term is "novac"
but people call it "lova", "pare", "šuške"...


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