Losing translated Files if left in Temp
Thread poster: NR_Stedman
NR_Stedman  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:54
French to English
Sep 2, 2008

Does the following happen to anyone else and if so how can you recover the lost file? PS I have Vista and Thunderbird 2:

Sometimes I open an email attachment in thunderbird and start translating it immediately before saving the file in another folder. When I finish my translation I save the file. However, this translation seems to completely disappear and I an unable to recover it anywhere. It is not listed under recent documents and when I reopen the attatchment the translation has not replaced the original document. Where has my translation gone?
Does this happen in outlook?

Thanks for advice on how to avoid this problem

[Edited at 2008-09-02 09:20]

[Edited at 2008-09-02 11:28]


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Andrea Jarmuschewski  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:54
Member (2007)
French to German
+ ...
Do a search including temp files Sep 2, 2008

Hi, that has occurred to me once and I was frantic! You should do a search (start - search; through part of the document title or a special word in it) and tick off the box which says something like "include temporary and hidden files/programs". I have it in French so I do not know the exact wording. It'll surely show up this way - at least it did for me!

Andrea


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Marie-Hélène Hayles  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:54
Italian to English
+ ...
It has happened to me Sep 2, 2008

You can find the file by searching, as Andrea says, but the best way to avoid the problem is to always save your attachments and then open them from the required application, rather than opening them directly from your e-mail program.

Also remember that if you translated it with a CAT you should still have the translation in your TM, so if you can't find the file you can run the original through the CAT again and it should translate it all automatically.

Off topic: As a native English translator, I hope you are aware that your discussion title should be "Losing translated files", not loosing! Sorry for being pernickety but this typo/spelling error is ever more pervasive and it drives me mad.

[Edited at 2008-09-02 10:34]


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Simon Mountifield  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:54
French to English
Couple of ideas Sep 2, 2008

Hi,

Normally, you won't lose the file permanently unless you run something like Disk Cleanup. Here are a couple of ideas for tracking down any lost files.

If you've been working with Word, a quick way is to click on File and then Open. In the Open dialogue box, click on My Recent Documents on the left and hopefully your file will be there.

Otherwise, the file path on my system (Windows XP and Thunderbird 2) is as follows:

- C:/Documents and Settings/Username/Local Settings/Temp

Note that Username is whatever name you specified when you set up your computer. After clicking on "Documents and Settings", you'll probably have a choice of "All Users", "Default User" and "YourName or Username", so go for "Username". Andrea is right in saying that you'll have to check the radio button Show hidden files and folders in Windows Explorer (Tools > Folder Options > View tab).

As Marie-Hélène suggested, the best thing is to get into the habit of saving the file in a specific folder before working on it.

HTH,

Simon

[Edited at 2008-09-02 11:37]


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Siegfried Armbruster  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 20:54
Member (2004)
English to German
+ ...
It is a feature, not a problem Sep 2, 2008

In computing, a temporary folder or temporary directory is a directory used to hold temporary files. Many operating systems and some software automatically delete the contents of this directory at bootup or at regular intervals.

For security reasons, it is best for each user to have his own temporary directory, since there has been a history of security vulnerabilities with temporary files due to programs incorrect file permissions or race conditions.

When a user opens an attached file from Outlook or other email utilities, the default save location is often an obscurely-named temporary folder (e.g. C:\Documents and Settings\Nathan Larson\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\S9QNS9UR\). Thus, it is easy, after modifying the file, to inadvertently save it, thereupon closing it, and then have no idea where to find it later. If this happens, a way to retrieve the file may be to open the original attachment again and attempt to save it; this will usually show the temporary folder's path where the modified file is located.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temporary_folder

The problem occurs when users don't take the computer/software serious:

"temporary" means:

impermanent: not permanent; not lasting;
wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn


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tinageta  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:54
English to Latvian
+ ...
My advice Sep 2, 2008

Make it a habit to save the files. With all due respect but any other workarounds and "solutions" are simply silly and inefficient.

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Boyan Brezinsky  Identity Verified
Bulgaria
Local time: 21:54
English to Bulgarian
+ ...
E-mail attachments don't work that way Sep 2, 2008

NR_Stedman wrote:
...........
Where has my translation gone?
Does this happen in outlook?
.........

The file with your translation has been deleted. This behaviour is not a bug, it is by design. Attachments have never been supposed to work the way you are using them. And this happens in MS Outlook as well, although from time to time it "forgets" to delete the temporary file, so one has some chance to find it.
There is no workaround. The solution is simple and has been already pointed out - save the attachment first, then edit the saved file.


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Gerard de Noord  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:54
Member (2003)
German to Dutch
+ ...
This happens in Outlook too Sep 2, 2008

This is what I do to recuperate documents like that: be careful. Open the e-mail attachment again and select File/Save As. The Save As dialog will probably show you all files in the hidden folder. If you see your document, select it and copy it to your desktop.

Regards,
Gerard


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NR_Stedman  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:54
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Gerard. Your solution seems to be the simplest Sep 2, 2008

Open the e-mail attachment again and select File/Save As. The Save As dialog will probably show you all files in the hidden folder. If you see your document, select it and copy it to your desktop

I will do this next time I forget to transfer the file first! Email software should prevent you from making this mistake and warn you when you save the file;


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Marie-Hélène Hayles  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:54
Italian to English
+ ...
software Sep 3, 2008

NR_Stedman wrote:
Email software should prevent you from making this mistake and warn you when you save the file;


I'd say MS Office software should prevent you from saving amended files in temporary folders - the "save as" option should pop up automatically when you try, just as it does when you save a newly created file. But anyway, it's a trivial but extremely irritating problem which simply shouldn't arise.


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