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How to type a truly dotted underline in Word
Thread poster: Reed James

Reed James
Chile
Local time: 18:48
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
Nov 6, 2006

Hello.

I often translate certificates and like to recreate original formatting. Word has an underline that is similar to a dotted line, but somewhat coarser. Is there a way to use jsut periods like this: ....................... (but with text directly above it)? Thanks.

Reed


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John Jory  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:48
Member (2004)
English to German
+ ...
Provided you have the space ... Nov 6, 2006

you can put dots in the line below your text and then adjust the line spacing of the 'dotted line' to, say 0.4 and see what it looks like. Try various line spacings until you're happy with the result.

HTH John


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Gerard de Noord  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 22:48
Member (2003)
German to Dutch
+ ...
Maybe this is what you're doing now Nov 6, 2006

Maybe this is what you're doing now, but I would select the text, would use Format/Font and would select one of the two dotted underline styles.

Regards,
Gerard


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Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 15:48
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Table Nov 6, 2006

I usually put that kind of thing in a table and format the table so that certain borders are dotted. I use tables a lot, also to avoid tabs, for example, which have a tendency to move out of place when you make a change in wording or font size.

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Tony M  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 22:48
Member
French to English
+ ...
Graphics solution too Nov 6, 2006

Although it's rather clumsy, and hardly to be recommended, you might as a last resort consider creating your line as a graphic element, where you have a much greater choice of styles and weights of line, and then positioning it appropriately.

A lot of kerfuffle, but for certain applications could be a viable solution.


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:48
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Not strictly on topic... but Nov 6, 2006

Tina Vonhof wrote:

I usually put that kind of thing in a table and format the table so that certain borders are dotted. I use tables a lot, also to avoid tabs, for example, which have a tendency to move out of place when you make a change in wording or font size.


Do you set the tabs or do you just press the tab so many times, until the text is justified as you need it? If you only are pressing the tab button, such formatting will change every time you open the file on another computer or change anything - as you said. Instead of doing so, consider setting fixed tab points. Consult Word help file on how to do so - Word help belongs to the best help sources I know.
BTW, if you change the font size, this affects tables too - not a big difference to tabs. Properly used, both methods have their advantages.

Regards
Jerzy

[Edited at 2006-11-07 08:30]


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Reed James
Chile
Local time: 18:48
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
TOPIC STARTER
How would I go about doing that? Nov 7, 2006

Tony -Dusty- wrote:

Although it's rather clumsy, and hardly to be recommended, you might as a last resort consider creating your line as a graphic element, where you have a much greater choice of styles and weights of line, and then positioning it appropriately.

A lot of kerfuffle, but for certain applications could be a viable solution.


Your suggestion made me think of doing this: .................., capturing it as an image with SnagIt and then pasting it as a transparent floating image.

Reed


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Reed James
Chile
Local time: 18:48
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
TOPIC STARTER
Yes, that's what I am doing now Nov 7, 2006

Gerard de Noord wrote:

Maybe this is what you're doing now, but I would select the text, would use Format/Font and would select one of the two dotted underline styles.



Gerard,

Yes, that is an easy but not perfect solution. I have even created a macro that does the job nicely and quickly. However, if you look at say, passports or other official documents (from Spain and Latin America at least) you will see that the dotted line is finer than what Word has to offer. Hence my query. Thanks.

Reed


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Reed James
Chile
Local time: 18:48
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
TOPIC STARTER
Been there, done that Nov 7, 2006

John Jory wrote:

you can put dots in the line below your text and then adjust the line spacing of the 'dotted line' to, say 0.4 and see what it looks like. Try various line spacings until you're happy with the result.

HTH John


John,

Thanks for reminding me of that solution. I had tried it once but was put off by all the mouseclicks and keystrokes needed to get the job done. Is there, by any chance, a nifty macro out there that will save time and effort? Thanks.

Reed


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Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 15:48
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Tabs vs. Tables Nov 7, 2006

[quote] Jerzy Czopik wrote:

Do you set the tabs or do you just press the tab so many times, until the text is justified as you need it? Using tab does not mean not only pressing the TAB button. [quote]

Indeed Jerzy, for a small amount of text I would not bother to set the tabs, I would just press the tab button. But, as I said, I rarely use tabs. I prefer to use tables because they have many other advantages. It' all a matter of preference.


[Edited at 2006-11-07 16:19]


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Henrik Pipoyan  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:48
Member (2004)
English to Armenian
I think table is the best solution Nov 7, 2006

Tina Vonhof wrote:

I usually put that kind of thing in a table and format the table so that certain borders are dotted. I use tables a lot, also to avoid tabs, for example, which have a tendency to move out of place when you make a change in wording or font size.


I always use a table in such cases. It allows you not only to underline some segments of text with dotted lines, but also to alternate underlined text with plain text on the same line, add smaller text right under the line, assign very easily the desired format to each separate cell, organize the text neatly, create facing pages and finally create side borders for the passport. And last, but not least, if you often translate such documents, table provides the easiest way to create a form and replace the text. MS Word allows a number of other ways to do all this, but I think table is the best solution.


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:48
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
@Tina Nov 7, 2006

I´m very sorry for beeing rude. Truly I don´t know why.
Must have had a very bad day. Please accept my apology for that. Sorry once again.

Kind regads
Jerzy


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R Farhat  Identity Verified
Lebanon
Local time: 23:48
Member (2004)
English to Arabic
+ ...
font Nov 7, 2006

Hi Reed,

I'm not sure if this is what you are looking for, but here it is:

highlight the word you want to put dots under.
click on U (underline).
right-click that word and choose Font.
in the font box, look for "undeline style" and choose the second dotted sample.

this should put dots under the needed word.



i just noticed Gerard's reply. yes, that's it!


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Angeliki Papadopoulou  Identity Verified
Greece
Local time: 23:48
English to Greek
+ ...
It works like a dream Nov 7, 2006

Randa

I tried it and it works beautifully. Thank you very much for this tip. I also translate forms from time to time, and this is very useful to know


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