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Poll: Do you print your translation to have a final review before delivery?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 13:58
SITE STAFF
May 13, 2008

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you print your translation to have a final review before delivery?".

This poll was originally submitted by María Teresa Jones Acebal

View the poll here

A forum topic will appear each time a new poll is run. For more information, see: http://proz.com/topic/33629


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jokerman
Germany
Local time: 22:58
English to German
+ ...
No, never... May 13, 2008

I just review it carefully on the screen. (well, I admit it's somewhat less carefully if I know that there will be another proofreader/editor to do it as well).

I suppose that reviewing would be easier with the print version, yet I just prefere to avoid the hassle with printing and then disposing the paper afterwards. Never really thought about whether this method saves or rather wastes time though.


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neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:58
Spanish to English
+ ...
I hope I can express my honest and immediate reaction to this question... May 13, 2008

... without being called to order by the Proz mediators.
My reply is: "are you mad"? - with the price of paper and printing ink (especially proprietary format inks, like HP, Canon etc), it would not be an option for me. And why print out if you can read the text on screen?
I have one friend (no longer actively translating) who used to print out the source texts because he didn't feel comfortable working with PC screens. His IT savvy son (Dinosaur Jnr.) has now taken over that end of the business and his dad has resigned himself to not being able to use email, browsers, online resources and the plethora of modern aids now available in translation and business in general.


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Sundar Gopalakrishnan
India
Local time: 02:28
English to Tamil
+ ...
Tight Deadlines Prevent a Final Review May 13, 2008

When it comes to translations, I am a perfectionist. But usually tight deadlines prevent me from having a final review. I regret it. But I can't do anything in this regard since almost all the clients insist on timely delivery.

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LegalTransform  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:58
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
I print each document twice May 13, 2008

I proofread/edit the final draft of each document once or twice on screen, then print it out for a third edit (you would be surprised how many things you miss if you proofread on the computer screen). Since I do not use a CAT tool, this is the easiest way to put each document side-by-side and check to make sure that no text is missing and that all names and numbers are correct. I read each sentence in the target language, followed by my translation. I then enter any corrections into the computer file and print it out again (unless there were very few corrections made or if it is a very small document) for a final check (preferably several days later).


[Edited at 2008-05-13 15:41]


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M Helena Ayala
United States
Local time: 13:58
English to Spanish
+ ...
Sometimes May 13, 2008

Only when I have to go out (and only if it less than 5 pages long). Reviewing a translation on paper while waiting is a good way to kill time (e.g. at a doctor's office, waiting in line in banks, supermarkets, etc.)

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No, but .... May 13, 2008

Printout has some merit.
For some magical reason, it reads better, and I'm able to catch more flaw such as typo, grammartical mistakes, etc.
However, I kicked this practice out for some, especially since CAT sneaked in to the whole picture.
Which is better? I don't know. But CAT is a big investment. I am inclined to give more credits than it deserves when it comes to what is being discussed here.


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Claire Cox
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:58
French to English
+ ...
Always May 13, 2008

As Jeff says, it's amazing what you miss when you read it on the screen. I think your brain is so used to looking at it on the screen that it's very easy to gloss over things. I print my first draft off to check against the original, then put in my changes and print off again for another check against the edited file. If there have been a lot of changes I then print off again before I do my final read-through of the document as a stand-alone English text, preferably after at least a couple of hours have elapsed, although this isn't always possible! I do use CAT tools but I also dictate, so it's possible for errors to creep in when you're dictating at speed.

I should add that I do use both sides of my paper (and recycle/shred it when it's finished!) and I use compatible inks so my ink bills have reduced significantly from when I used to use the astronomically expensive manufacturer's ink. Mind you, my printers tend to only last about 18 months maximum and I've found it cheaper to replace the printer and continue using compatible ink than switch back to manufacturer's ink as the printer repair shops recommend!

[Edited at 2008-05-13 16:09]

[Edited at 2008-05-13 16:10]


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Elizabeth Joy Pitt de Morales  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:58
Member (2007)
Spanish to English
+ ...
It depends on the job May 13, 2008

If it's a small or very simple job, an onscreen proof is usually sufficient (unless it's late and I'm tired), but for large or complex jobs (with tables (numbers), charts, footnotes, bookmarks, etc. etc.), or a job I've had to do without my CAT, I always proof from a hard copy.

Neilmac is right; the cost of paper and proprietary inks is out of this world. I've mitigated this somewhat by printing on both sides of the paper and using non-proprietary ink (I figure by the time the printer breaks down from the cheap ink as threatened by the manufacturer, I will have saved more than the cost of replacing it). On the other hand, I charge premium rates and I don't mind spending a few euros on making sure it the translation is as perfect as I can make it. I've found that the bigger/more complex the job is, the more likely I am to catch an error on the printout that I missed during the onscreen proof. All of this paper is recycled (confidential documents are shredded first) in the summer or re-used as a firestarter in my fireplace in the winter.


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Catherine Shepherd  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:58
Spanish to English
+ ...
Sometimes May 13, 2008

When it's a very long text I normally do (like a book or other long literary texts), it's easier on my eyes!! I also spot mistakes better on paper than on the screen. And I can sit on the sofa and relax while I work!

As for printing being expensive, the only thing I use my printer for is to print out my invoices once a month, so I might as well use it for something else...! Having said that, I wouldn't print out EVERY translation I do, because that would definitely become expensive.


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Patricia Rosas  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:58
Spanish to English
+ ...
text-to-voice solution May 13, 2008

neilmac wrote:

... without being called to order by the Proz mediators.
My reply is: "are you mad"? - with the price of paper and printing ink (especially proprietary format inks, like HP, Canon etc), it would not be an option for me. And why print out if you can read the text on screen?


I'm with you, Neil! But what made the difference was using the "View Reading Layout" mode in Word combined with a text-to-speech tool using Cepstral voices or, as an option, the DNS read-back option.

I find that when I read along with the voice, I catch things that I truly believe I wouldn't have caught even on paper.

The cost (and waste!) of printouts is something I take very seriously, and I've been interested to watch how gradually some of the presses I work with are coming around to doing electronic edits of manuscripts. One just had me to do a book: first they sent me a printout, then the e-files, then I printed out the tracked file, and sent it to the author, who made hand edits and photocopied that (for his records), returning the annotated original to me. I then keyed in all his changes, printed the final copy, and shipped it and his copy back to the press.

On the second book, I don't need to print the final copy, but I still had to print a copy for the author to mark. All the same, it's saving me time and money and saving the environment from the waste.

I'm hoping someday, we won't need printers at all!

Patricia


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Elin Davies  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Member (2008)
English to Welsh
+ ...
Have given up on printers completely May 13, 2008

I gave away my last printer to someone who needed it more than I. I used to print out the source and then again my translation, but never do now more due to environmental issues than cost - finally stopped when I looked at the huge collection of empty paper supplies boxes I had. Between the paper, ink cartridges and printers I was going through and the trips to stationers to buy them, we were all doomed.

If I need to print anything, there are plenty of people to hand who I can call in on, and it gets me out of the house. I have to do this about twice to three times a year. For checking, I go through everything on screen very slowly and carefully, and for big jobs preferably having slept on the translation first. Also, printing it out takes me away from my desk and into zones of distraction, whilst being glued to the computer means I'm glued to the task


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Textklick  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:58
German to English
+ ...
Absolutely May 13, 2008

Claire Cox wrote:

As Jeff says, it's amazing what you miss when you read it on the screen. I think your


I had that drummed in to me when working inhouse and believe me - it's remarkably true.

You don't believe me? Try it!

Not convenient with websites, but I offer an online (linguistic) test option prior to the customer going live, as strange things can happen (like some charactêrs göing f#ùnny, etc).

Chris


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LegalTransform  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:58
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Quick print May 13, 2008

If you set your printer to Quick Print/Fast Print or the equivalent option for your printer, you can get several hundred more pages out of each ink cartridge. This level of printing is sufficient for most proofreading purposes.

I'm amazed at the number of people who selected "no, never". Even after careful editing on screen, my print-outs are filled with edits/corrections, phrases that need double checking, sentences that need to be re-worked to sound more native, etc. In addition, it is time away from the computer which is always a good thing.


[Edited at 2008-05-13 17:19]


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Rosa Cabral  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:58
English to Italian
+ ...
I wish I could but do about 50% of them May 13, 2008

Due to time constraints (mostly) and price of everything I cannot print everything out especially if it is voluminous. The short (under 10 pages) I usually print out or try to print them 2 pages to one page for correction purposes. Unfortunately, most translations end up going to different time zones and therefore I usually lose more than half a day of working time and usually get the stuff late, too. It is unfortunate that we are always under stress for time and therefore may sometimes work when we are tired, or at least not at our best.
However, the benefits of freelance translation have to be offset by some negatives and this is it.


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