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Poll: Has translation/interpretation changed your social life?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 05:24
SITE STAFF
Jan 22, 2007

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Has translation/interpretation changed your social life?".

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A forum topic will appear each time a new poll is run. For more information, see: http://proz.com/topic/33629


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Stephanie Mitchel  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 08:24
French to English
One/two punch Jan 22, 2007

Between T&I and having a toddler, I'm grateful if I ever get to see my friends.

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writeaway  Identity Verified

Local time: 13:24
Partial member (2003)
French to English
+ ...
What "life" ? Jan 22, 2007

At least interpreters get out of the house. But as a translator I feel buried alive. My advice-have a life before you do this job. I'm so glad I did because this is not living.

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Lawyer-Linguist  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 12:24
Dutch to English
+ ...
Writing from within the four walls of this cell .... Jan 22, 2007

It's a Blue Monday here too - time for a break!

[Edited at 2007-01-22 17:32]


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Erik Hansson  Identity Verified
Germany
Member (2002)
Swedish
+ ...
Core value of being self-employed Jan 22, 2007

writeaway wrote:

At least interpreters get out of the house. But as a translator I feel buried alive. My advice-have a life before you do this job. I'm so glad I did because this is not living.


I simply can't agree on this one. A majority of us are self-employed, and if you're well into business you don't need to work day and night, 20 hours a day and forget the social life you either had or will never get.

Compare your situation with being emyployed, working from 9 to 5 every day, having a boss who's a pain in your neck and so on. I think most of us are happy with being self-employed, aren't we? Next question would be if we think we'll go bankrupt just because we turn down that next job and decide to take a weekend holiday.

I can still very well remember the hard time at the beginning of a translator's career, with looking for clients etc. but it doesn't mean that you have to forget your social life. Finding a good balance between work and private life is the solution.

Cheers!
Erik

**********************************
Erik Hansson ( SFÖ )
Technical translator DE-SV
Hansson Übersetzungen GmbH
Website www.hansson.de
ProZ profile http://www.proz.com/pro/21654
***********************************


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Clara Duarte  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 12:24
English to Portuguese
+ ...
work+school+taking care of 7 pets+paying attention to my husband-to-be Jan 22, 2007

That leaves me little time to go out and meet friends, but part of the lack of time is due to lack of self-discipline and time management on my behalf.

Also, I love being at home so much that I don't miss going outside and don't force myself to do so.

Nevertheless the pressure, I love my job!


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Textklick  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:24
German to English
+ ...
The balance is there - just try and remember where Jan 22, 2007

Erik Hansson wrote:

writeaway wrote:

At least interpreters get out of the house. But as a translator I feel buried alive. My advice-have a life before you do this job. I'm so glad I did because this is not living.


Compare your situation with being emyployed, working from 9 to 5 every day, having a boss who's a pain in your neck and so on. I think most of us are happy with being self-employed, aren't we? Next question would be if we think we'll go bankrupt just because we turn down that next job and decide to take a weekend holiday.

I can still very well remember the hard time at the beginning of a translator's career, with looking for clients etc. but it doesn't mean that you have to forget your social life. Finding a good balance between work and private life is the solution.



I agree with Erik in principle.

Even well after having becoming established, I have less time for my social life, although it has in another way been refreshingly enriched and widened, thanks to new friends I have made on Proz.

Here I do not refer to E-mail chit-chat, but personal meetings at Powwows and indeed elsewhere, (although I would include sharing a beer together via Skype as a personal meeting).;-)

One New Year's Resolution was: turn more business away. I took my longest holiday (2 weeks) over Xmas/New Year. Orders started to trickle through on my mobile phone towards the end of it, so I could just walk straight back and get stuck in. Long weekends in between times are also fun and more spontaneously manageable if you are a freelancer.

I am sure I could make more time, if I wanted to. However, after a long and diverse career, I should also add that I have never enjoyed my work nor its pecuniary aspects so much.

There is also the "addiction" aspect that I commented on here: http://www.proz.com/post/465074#465074

So: time to log out, before Herr Hansson downloads Skype and finally buys me that e-beer...

Ciao
Chris


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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:24
Flemish to English
+ ...
Free at last? Jan 22, 2007

Erik Hansson wrote:

I simply can't agree on this one. A majority of us are self-employed, and if you're well into business you don't need to work day and night, 20 hours a day and forget the social life you either had or will never get.

Compare your situation with being emyployed, working from 9 to 5 every day, having a boss who's a pain in your neck and so on. I think most of us are happy with being self-employed, aren't we? Next question would be if we think we'll go bankrupt just because we turn down that next job and decide to take a weekend holiday.


Not if you want to make a lot of money. In that case you have to be available 7/7 from when you get up until you go to sleep and even then you have to delegate to others.

Compare that with a freelance ITer at a bank, earning €500 per working bankday or a freelance ITer in the City working 9-5 or somewhat later, earning £500 per day and this for four days a week. The other 3 days, this person programs for his/her other clients. An ideal balance?

An freelance interpreter is under the pressure of the moment, but when (s)he goes home, the £350-€500 are earned. A translator has to work against the deadline, even if that means burning the midnight oil.
Once the translation is delivered, the search for the needle in the haystack to reduce rates starts, followed by the chase of payments. This is seldom the case with freelance IT-services or interpreting.


[Edited at 2007-01-22 18:03]


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Andres & Leticia Enjuto  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 09:24
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
More and better quality Jan 22, 2007

Erik Hansson wrote:

A majority of us are self-employed, and if you're well into business you don't need to work day and night, 20 hours a day and forget the social life you either had or will never get.



I couldn't agree more with you, Erik.



Compare your situation with being emyployed, working from 9 to 5 every day, having a boss who's a pain in your neck and so on. I think most of us are happy with being self-employed, aren't we? Next question would be if we think we'll go bankrupt just because we turn down that next job and decide to take a weekend holiday.



I still remember when I was an employee, working from 8 to 18 every day, travelling a lot, also on weekends, with a boss that actually was a pain in the neck, back, etc., calling me on weekends, holidays, Christmas and so on for stupid things... and earning much less than now.

With that situation, when I managed to gather with friends and family I was usually exhausted and bad-humored. The same at home with my wife and daughter.

Now I manage my business and schedule, earn more, do what I love, and spend much more time at home with my family. When we go out I can actually enjoy and relax.
I do have a lot of work to do, but it is controlled and I learned to live with it. And I am (little by little) learning to say 'no'... that's the hardest part, indeed!

For those of you who never did anything else but translation, please consider that our position is much better than the average, mainly because we can choose the direction of our business.

Good working week for everyone!

Andrés

[Edited at 2007-01-22 19:30]

[Edited at 2007-01-23 08:45]


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Sónia Tavares
Germany
Local time: 13:24
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
A rewarding job Jan 22, 2007

Since last year I became a full-time freelance translator and I think it was the best decision I made. Sometimes I forget to eat, I stay up late and some other times I just work all night long... But I don't mind a bit. I consider Translation an art, I fully respect our work and I love doing it. I like the "rush" that this job implies, and from my point of view it is very rewarding.
I have a 13 months daughter and as a freelancer I can see her grow everyday! That means at least an extra salary.

Have a nice week ahead!
Sónia Tavares


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:24
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
I agree Jan 22, 2007

Erik Hansson wrote:

writeaway wrote:

At least interpreters get out of the house. But as a translator I feel buried alive. My advice-have a life before you do this job. I'm so glad I did because this is not living.


I simply can't agree on this one. A majority of us are self-employed, and if you're well into business you don't need to work day and night, 20 hours a day and forget the social life you either had or will never get.

Compare your situation with being emyployed, working from 9 to 5 every day, having a boss who's a pain in your neck and so on. I think most of us are happy with being self-employed, aren't we? Next question would be if we think we'll go bankrupt just because we turn down that next job and decide to take a weekend holiday.

I can still very well remember the hard time at the beginning of a translator's career, with looking for clients etc. but it doesn't mean that you have to forget your social life. Finding a good balance between work and private life is the solution.

Cheers!
Erik

**********************************
Erik Hansson ( SFÖ )
Technical translator DE-SV
Hansson Übersetzungen GmbH
Website www.hansson.de
ProZ profile http://www.proz.com/pro/21654
***********************************


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:24
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
YES! Jan 22, 2007

Erik Hansson wrote:

writeaway wrote:

At least interpreters get out of the house. But as a translator I feel buried alive. My advice-have a life before you do this job. I'm so glad I did because this is not living.


I simply can't agree on this one. A majority of us are self-employed, and if you're well into business you don't need to work day and night, 20 hours a day and forget the social life you either had or will never get.

Compare your situation with being emyployed, working from 9 to 5 every day, having a boss who's a pain in your neck and so on. I think most of us are happy with being self-employed, aren't we? Next question would be if we think we'll go bankrupt just because we turn down that next job and decide to take a weekend holiday.

I can still very well remember the hard time at the beginning of a translator's career, with looking for clients etc. but it doesn't mean that you have to forget your social life. Finding a good balance between work and private life is the solution.

Cheers!
Erik

**********************************
Erik Hansson ( SFÖ )
Technical translator DE-SV
Hansson Übersetzungen GmbH
Website www.hansson.de
ProZ profile http://www.proz.com/pro/21654
***********************************


Erik, I agree with you 100%. I have more time for socialising when I want to, which I never had when employed, not to mention the ghastliness of commuting to work on the London tube or the New York subway - unless you call that a social life ...
Jenny Forbes.


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Angie Garbarino  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:24
Member (2003)
French to Italian
+ ...
I totally agree with you Jan 22, 2007

writeaway wrote:

At least interpreters get out of the house. But as a translator I feel buried alive. My advice-have a life before you do this job. I'm so glad I did because this is not living


Same here, fortunately I had a life before, my answer was "what social life"?


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Anne Patteet  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:24
English to French
+ ...
I agree with Erik and, Jan 23, 2007

also, I find I have the social life I want because I work at the time I want/can/need.
Having children, I am able to walk them to school, work for a few hours, walk them back from school, make them dinner, check them while they do their homework, put them to bed and then go back to work at night if needed, my husband working besides me also.
If a friend wants to see me (or I want to see him/her) during the day, I can often say yes because I can make up for that time at night. I can go on field trips with the children, while having a good time with the other accompanying parents. The kids will remember their mom could go with them on those trips. And when there is too much work, my family doesn't mind (my husband works from home too and he takes on more of the home chores load then) because it is not systematic and they know that most of the time I try to be with them.
To me, that is a big part of what I consider being my "social life".
And if we're talking about going out, inviting friends over, going to their place etc, week-ends are for that, and I don't consider money more important than the time spent with my family and/or friends. So, I think if one doesn't have enough time for his/her social life, one can work a little less. If one thinks he/she's not earning enough, it is always time to study and become something else.


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