Mobile menu

Pages in topic:   [1 2 3] >
Poll: If you understand the original language of a movie, you prefer to watch it in...
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 09:26
SITE STAFF
Feb 8, 2007

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "If you understand the original language of a movie, you prefer to watch it in...".

This poll was originally submitted by Laura Leal

View the poll here

A forum topic will appear each time a new poll is run. For more information, see: http://proz.com/topic/33629


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:26
English to Arabic
+ ...
Original language subtitles are brilliant (for American films)... Feb 8, 2007

Most of the times when I watch American films I miss half of what's being said, even though I pride myself with my "almost near-native" English skills. They just mumble and whisper too much!
So I really love it when I can watch a film on DVD with original subtitles -suddenly the plot becomes so much clearer!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:26
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Sound-tracks vary so in clarity Feb 8, 2007

Nice poll!
If I understand the original language, I prefer to watch the film in that language without subtitles, because it's a challenge. Subtitles can distract me, because I tend to keep checking whether they've got it right! However, sound-tracks vary so greatly in clarity - some are so fuzzy that subtitles help - even in English mother-tongue films.
Did anyone see "Pan's Labyrinth" (El Laberinto del Faúno)? What an extraordinary film! It's a Spanish film directed and scripted by Mexican-born Guillermo del Toro that won an award at Cannes recently. Its sound-track was so crystal clear that I didn't need its English subtitles at all. Conversely, Pedro Almodóvar's "Volver" was so fuzzy that I could hardly understand a word - perhaps too Andalucian for my Castillian-trained ear? Fascinating film, though.
Regards, Jenny.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:26
English to Arabic
+ ...
Also for the fun of it, Arabic subtitles for some English films... Feb 8, 2007

... just to spot the number of mistakes they make!
One classic which I've spotted myself:
English original: "I've reserved a table for five thirty".
Arabic subtitles: "I've reserved a table for thirty-five persons"!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Pamela Peralta  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 12:26
English to Spanish
+ ...
Original with mother tongue subtitles Feb 8, 2007

I chose the above because it happens most of the time. I like watching movies or series in their original language, yes, but it also depends on what I'm watching.

For example, if I'm watching Friends (the American comedy series) I like taking a look at the subtitles when they make a joke or say something smart to see how the translator handled it. But if I'm watching CSI I use the closed caption feature to read the spelling of those big words they use in criminology.

I have found at least one exception to what I chose for the poll. I went to see the movie SHREK 2 dubbed in Spanish the first time and we laughed so hard. Then I went to watch it in the original language, English, and I was so disappointed that I wanted to leave 30 minutes into the movie.


[Edited at 2007-02-08 13:57]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jocelyne S  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 18:26
Member
French to English
+ ...
Depends on the language Feb 8, 2007

I generally prefer to watch movies in their original version, without subtitles, but this is of course dependant on the original language. As mentioned above, I too find it hard to break the habit of "translating as I go" and end up concentrating more on the quality of the subtitles than on the storyline.

I dabble in a couple of languages for fun (but which are not at all source languages for translation). I find that watching films in these languages is great practice, but I also appreciate subtitles when things get a little too complicated for my untrained ear.

In any case, I try to avoid dubbed-over films whenever possible.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Aurélie DANIEL  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 18:26
English to French
+ ...
Other Feb 8, 2007

I always prefer to hear the voice of the actors, whether they speak French, English, Spanish, Chinese or any other language. I know that the people who dub movies are real actors too, but I just prefer to get the whole pack from the original actor.

Even when I don't need subtitles I always chose to turn them on (on DVDs for example), and preferably not in my mother tongue. So for an English speaking movie I'll have the subtitles in Spanish, and vice versa, or maybe in another language that I don't speak but can understand to some extent (Portugese, Italian, German...) if I am in the mood for it.

This habit comes from the year I studied in Amsterdam. Our Dutch teacher was always always on a sick leave, and the few Dutch words and expressions I did learn, I picked up from watching movies in English subtitled in Dutch. In the beginning it gave me headaches, then I just got addicted. I guess it's like what some people experience with sudoku puzzles. I just love to compare what I hear and what I read, I get a kick out of it.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Gillian Scheibelein  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 18:26
Member (2003)
German to English
+ ...
Original + subtitles in opposite language Feb 8, 2007

i.e. English + German subtitles or German with English subtitles.

Perhaps because I find it difficult to switch off from translating, but it is useful to see how everyday slang etc. has been translated. I usually write down good catchphrases.

Nevertheless, I sometimes watch English/English when I find it difficult to understand the mumbling, especially when everyone is talking at once (very rare in a German film). I had to watch "Finding Forrester" and the new version of "Shaft" with English subtitles followed by the German translation(!) as the American slang had me completely stumped (e.g. dog).

I recent boo-boo that made me laugh: "she's well-heeled" translated as "well-healed"


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Anne Patteet  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:26
English to French
+ ...
Me too... Feb 8, 2007

Jenny Forbes wrote:

Nice poll!
If I understand the original language, I prefer to watch the film in that language without subtitles, because it's a challenge. Subtitles can distract me, because I tend to keep checking whether they've got it right! However, sound-tracks vary so greatly in clarity - some are so fuzzy that subtitles help - even in English mother-tongue films.
(...)
Regards, Jenny.


I couldn't have said it better, Jenny

For Latin American productions in Spanish, I don't need any help. Now when I watch Almodovar's movies, I do, though I can perfectly understand my friends from Spain.
For American movies, I prefer to take the challenge but sometimes I do prefer the original subtitles, not to miss the small things.
Even as a teenager, I used to choose the movie theaters where they would show the movies in their original version with subtitles, as I liked to hear the "real actor" and not someone else's dubbing.

[Edited at 2007-02-08 14:16]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 14:26
English to Spanish
+ ...
A disappointed teenager Feb 8, 2007

Aurélie DANIEL wrote:

I always prefer to hear the voice of the actors, whether they speak French, English, Spanish, Chinese or any other language. I know that the people who dub movies are real actors too, but I just prefer to get the whole pack from the original actor.




I used to watch The Saint when I was young(er) on TV (dubbed.)

One day I heard The Saint's voice (oh, my God!) on somebody else's lips (not Roger Moore's). That... broke my heart.

For that subjective reason... I prefer subtitling.

Au


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Hynek Palatin  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 18:26
Member (2003)
English to Czech
+ ...
Original with mother tongue subtitles Feb 8, 2007

I prefer the original language even if I don't understand it - with mother tongue or English subtitles. Dubbing kills half of the experience. Unfortunately, the general public doesn't share the same opinion.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Rebecca Garber  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:26
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
Also for fun, American dubbed in German Feb 8, 2007

Nesrin wrote:

... just to spot the number of mistakes they make!
One classic which I've spotted myself:
English original: "I've reserved a table for five thirty".
Arabic subtitles: "I've reserved a table for thirty-five persons"!



Mostly because the voices don't match the American originals.
Hilarious! John Wayne in German is the best!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Clara Duarte  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 17:26
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Original + mother tongue subtitles Feb 8, 2007

I like having the possibility to hear the real actors and read the subtitles in Portuguese. It allows me to learn and to have a laugh sometimes.

Like Jenny, I also get distracted while trying to find mistakes and incorrections but sometimes the translation is more exciting than whatever I am watching.

Here in Portugal films and tv series are not dubbed, except some really rare cases, for instance The Knight Rider and A-Team dubbed in Brasilian Portuguese, or Friends dubbed to European Portuguese. TVI (an independent TV station) decided to spare some money and buy the dubbed versions from Brasil, and RTP (state TV) had a season of Friends dubbed in European Portuguese.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
TMSavaglio
United States
Local time: 12:26
English to French
+ ...
original subtitles for sake of clarity Feb 8, 2007

Sometimes when I'm watching a film in a language I understand, even my mother tongue English (especially British English), I like to have on the subtitles in the same language. It can help clarify slang, regionally different idioms as well as vocabulary words that I may be unfamiliar with. Sometimes in classes I wish I could turn on subtitles to make sure what I heard was what the professor said, and the same goes for a film. Jokes especially are much easier to understand when you can catch every word. Also, I really dislike dubbing, seeing the actors' mouths move differently than how the words are formed is disorienting, so I prefer subtitles in general.

[Edited at 2007-02-08 16:16]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Vittorina Klingbeil  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 18:26
Italian to English
+ ...
It's wonderful ... Feb 8, 2007

to pay more attention to the original version. We bought the "Pane e tulipani" DVD in Italy, not realising that it came only in Italian, without option of another language or subtitles. When we watched it at home my husband and children, who do not speak Italian, all agreed that it was much better to watch it just the way it was, because it was so rich in visual beauty and emotion. Often we are so busy reading the subtitles that we miss out a lot of the "other" action going on. Of course I was there to provide interpretation where needed ...

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2 3] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Poll: If you understand the original language of a movie, you prefer to watch it in...

Advanced search






SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »
WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs