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Poll: What font do you use when translating scanned documents / non-standard formats?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 23:25
SITE STAFF
Oct 30, 2007

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "What font do you use when translating scanned documents / non-standard formats?".

This poll was originally submitted by Marie-Hélène Hayles

View the poll here

A forum topic will appear each time a new poll is run. For more information, see: http://proz.com/topic/33629


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Rebecca Garber  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:25
Member (2005)
German to English
+ ...
Times New Roman is my default. Oct 30, 2007

It's not always my client's, and their default always trumps my default.

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Paul Dixon  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 03:25
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Verdana Oct 30, 2007

Verdana is definitely my favourite font, and I normally use size 11 or 12. Of course, if the text asks to keep the original font, I do.

Regarding popular fonts, Verdana and Arial are quite pleasing to the eye, but I don't think too much of Times New Roman.


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Noni Gilbert
Spain
Local time: 08:25
Member (2007)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Anything rather than Courier... Oct 30, 2007

...which makes me feel I'm producing an inferior piece of work!

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Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:25
Spanish to English
+ ...
I try to approximate the client's fonts and general layout Oct 30, 2007

It makes editing and proofreading much easier.

[Edited at 2007-10-30 15:15]


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Lawyer-Linguist  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 07:25
Dutch to English
+ ...
Same here Oct 30, 2007

Steven Capsuto wrote:

It makes editing and proofreading much easier.

[Edited at 2007-10-30 15:15]


But there are limits, I'm quick to draw the line if I feel I'm really crossing into the realm of DTP.

After all, at the end of the day we're selling our time. If I was that interested in charity work, I'd find a better cause.

[Edited at 2007-10-30 15:25]


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Christiane Boehme  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:25
English to German
+ ...
Close to original document Oct 30, 2007

I always try to match fonts and layout with the original document.
Otherwise my favorite font is Arial size 11. I use it for all my letters and invoices. But Times New Roman I don't like at all.


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 08:25
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Times for proofreading, then the client's font Oct 30, 2007

I find proofreading much easier in Times New Roman.

Somehow typos slip through in Arial, and you can't trust the spellchecker ... Other fonts are tricky too, but it is largely a matter of habit. I find italics especially difficult, but changing the format makes errors stand out.

I do follow the client's formatting in big, complicated jobs, but I sometimes save a backup with the original formatting, then convert to a proofing-friendly format to make sure I have caught ALL the errors. I correct them in the original formatting version, of course!

It's worth it!


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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:25
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Verdana, more often than not Oct 30, 2007

If the font seems immaterial, I use Verdana, but in some cases (legal documents, certificates etc.) Times New Roman seems more appropriate, or I may match the original font if I can.
My rather curious preference for Verdana font size is 9.5. The reason for this is historical: I was doing a regular job with a title line on each sheet which had limits on the maximum and minimum number of words.
While still using a typewriter (no, I don't go back as far as quill pens),
I knew that a certain number of characters produced a line of a certain size, and to match what I was used to in Verdana, 9.5 was about right.

[Edited at 2007-10-30 21:20]


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Marie-Hélène Hayles  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:25
Italian to English
+ ...
Times New Roman Oct 30, 2007

I suggested this poll because I get quite a few scanned letters to translate which were written in Comic Sans MS, which I find somewhat disconcerting - to me it looks completely unprofessional. So I refuse to use it (although I would if I were specifically asked to, of course!). I've also revised translations written in Courier New, which I find literally unreadable - I have to change it all to another font before I can work on it.

My preference is TNR in 11 or 12, but I'm OK with Arial (10) or Tahoma or Verdana.


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Kristaps Otrups
Denmark
Local time: 08:25
English to Latvian
+ ...
Comic Sans MS Oct 30, 2007

I use Comic Sans whenever I can, especially when translating legal documents. I think it really lightens up their serious tone a lot.

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LinguaLab.net
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:25
English to Norwegian
+ ...
Verdana Oct 30, 2007

I also use Verdana, it's just a personal preference.

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esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:25
Member (2006)
English to Russian
+ ...
DejaVu Fonts are my choice Oct 30, 2007

Normally, it's DejaVu Mono. Those fonts are far superior to Microsoft's by script/language coverage.

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Andres & Leticia Enjuto  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 03:25
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Off topic Oct 30, 2007

I hereby state that I hate, detest and despise Times New Roman font.
I am not sure about the reasons, though.

That is all I have to say now, and my apologies for diverting this honorable thread.

Good day!


Andrés


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Tamer Elzein
Local time: 08:25
English to Arabic
+ ...
Arial Unicode MS Oct 30, 2007

Since most of the work I handle needs to be translated into Arabic, using Verdana is a luxury I can't afford.

Actually, I probably wouldn't use Verdana, anyway. It's an amazing font for the Web, but since I started using the ClearType technology, I've come to love the way Serif fonts appear on my laptop screen.

Sometimes, I might use a certain font for proofreading then, when I'm done, I convert the font to my client's preference.


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