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Poll: Do you have a favorite word in each of your languages? Please share!
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff
ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 04:48
SITE STAFF
Feb 29, 2008

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you have a favorite word in each of your languages? Please share!".

This poll was originally submitted by Keren Terret

View the poll here

A forum topic will appear each time a new poll is run. For more information, see: http://proz.com/topic/33629


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Gemma Monco Waters  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 12:48
English to Italian
+ ...
I like "ciao" for Italian/ I like "dusty" for English, because it was the name of my beloved dog. Feb 29, 2008

ProZ.com Staff wrote:

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you have a favorite word in each of your languages? Please share!".

This poll was originally submitted by Keren Terret

View the poll here

A forum topic will appear each time a new poll is run. For more information, see: http://proz.com/topic/33629


[Edited at 2008-02-29 13:48]


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Boris Rogowski  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:48
English to German
the fist ones I can think of are Feb 29, 2008

German: "Schindluder"
English: "Milkshake"

Simple as that


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Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:48
English to Arabic
+ ...
English: gingerly Feb 29, 2008

Don't ask me why, but I fell in love with the word the first time I heard it, even before I could figure out what it means exactly. I just felt it was very descriptive, though I wasn't sure of what. Anyway, I later found out the definition is "with extreme care or delicacy", and I still love it.

I also love the words "snug", "chuffed" and other feel-good words. Oh, and "feel-good".

Trying to think of a German word I love... think think think...

As for my mother tongue Arabic, there are a lot of words that are good fun, esp. Egyptian slang.. but I can't think of one in particular now. Will come back later.


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Sarah Cuminetti  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 12:48
English to Italian
+ ...
English favorite:... Feb 29, 2008

... Surreptitiously.
I love like the sound of it.


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Lisa Nottmeyer
Spain
Local time: 12:48
Spanish to German
+ ...
old-fashioned German ... and adapted to Spanish Feb 29, 2008

A few months ago I got an email from a client which said:

"vielen Dank für Ihre Mühewaltung"

which would be "many thanks for your efforts" in a quite old-fashioned German, but I just loved it!

And for Spanish ...

I just can think about one word which really made me laugh for a couple of days.

It turned out to be the "word of the day" according to the RAE (Real Academia Española) when I saw it for the first time.
It´s the word "jaibol" - adapted from the English "Highball".

It´s actually a drink and colleagues from Mexico, Central America, etc. probably won´t find it that amazing, but for me ... what can I say .. it definitely made my day!!





[Edited at 2008-02-29 21:32]


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Alexander Kondorsky  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 14:48
English to Russian
+ ...
My favorite English word Feb 29, 2008

Pernicious. It's a very-very long story to explain)

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Sara Mullin  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 12:48
Member (2007)
English to French
+ ...
Pamplemousse Feb 29, 2008

I have no idea why!

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Kerstin Braun  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:48
Member (2003)
English to German
+ ...
Because they make me smile ... Feb 29, 2008

English: unceremoniously. Sounds like so much fuss!

German: Schniedel(wutz) Isn't it just cute? I actually thought this word was invented by Otto Waalkes, but it made me smile even more when I found it had made its way into the Langenscheidt Dictionary (never looked for it but just came across it as it was the first entry on a page and therefore printed bold on top of the page!)

Must have lost my marbles. Nice phrase too, come to think of it.


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Kathryn Litherland  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:48
Member (2007)
Spanish to English
+ ...
proletarianización Feb 29, 2008

Proletarianización is my favorite word in Spanish, in part I think because it looks like it should be very hard to say, but it rolls so "trippingly off the toungue"! A portion of my non-translation studies are in an area where it actually comes up with some frequency.

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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:48
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
fútbol and cóctel Feb 29, 2008

Lisa Nottmeyer wrote:

A few months ago I got an email from a client which said:

"vielen Dank für Ihre Mühewaltung"

which would be "many thanks for your efforts" in a quite old-fashioned German, but I just loved it!

And for Spanish ...

I just can think about one word which really made me laugh for a couple of days.

It turned out to be the "word of the day" according to the RAE (Real Academia Española) when I saw it for the first time.
It´s the word "jaibol" - adapted from the English "Highball".

It´s actually a drink and colleagues from Méjico, Central America, etc. probably won´t find it that amazing, but for me ... what can I say .. it definitely made my day!!





I like the way Spanish adapts English words to its own meticulous spelling rules, as in "fútbol" and "cóctel", too.
Love,
Jenny


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Ellemiek Drucker  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:48
English to Dutch
+ ...
Gezellig in Dutch Feb 29, 2008

Many Dutch people claim there is no English word for 'gezelligheid' and I must admit, I haven't found one that really fits the bill

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Miguel Miranda  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 11:48
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Yes Feb 29, 2008

One of my favorite words, in Portuguese, is esculhambação, and it's used only by Brasilians. It means anarchy, disorder, etc. It sounds very funny to me.

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K. Ponnan  Identity Verified
Malaysia
Local time: 19:48
English to Tamil
+ ...
Lackadaisical Feb 29, 2008

An English word I discovered years ago and had liked it since then. Decribes perfectly the attitude of some of the people I meet.

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JaneTranslates  Identity Verified
Puerto Rico
Local time: 07:48
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
May I include a language that isn't one of "mine"? Feb 29, 2008

Can't think of any one thing for my native tongue, English.

Spanish: "desafortunadamente" (unfortunately). So hard to believe that ordinary people use such a long word in common, ordinary speech!

Spanish: also "internacionalizarme" for much the same reason, although it's mainly singers and actors, not "ordinary people," who use it. Translation: "make myself known internationally."

And it's not one of "my" languages, but here goes:

French: "avec" (with). I used to doodle it during French class, comparing the smooth way that it flows when handwritten, compared to the multiple upward strokes of "with." (Remember handwriting? Try it! Check how long it takes you to write "with" compared to "avec"! OK, there's something seriously wrong with me.)

Jane


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