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Learning Brazilian Portuguese
Thread poster: MariusJacobsen

MariusJacobsen  Identity Verified
Norway
Local time: 02:15
English to Norwegian
+ ...
Mar 31, 2009

Hey!

I'm looking for an "easy-to-understand" podcast, webradio or something similar in Brazilian Portuguese. My fiancé is from Rio and I've been learning the basics of the language for a while now using books, software and a Brazilian Portuguese podcast (lessons).

Now, I'd like to listen to people talk =) No lessons, just every day talk. It doesn't matter if it's a radio station, as long as they don't play music the entire time.

Any suggestions?


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:15
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Globo TV network web site Mar 31, 2009

Go to http://www.globo.com and click on "videos" there. You'll have free access to a YouTube-type of the leading Brazilian TV network's past broadcasts.

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MariusJacobsen  Identity Verified
Norway
Local time: 02:15
English to Norwegian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks. I have another question Mar 31, 2009

Thank you so much for that! I've already watched a few clips and the site looks great!

But now I have another question. I really want to take Portuguese lessons. Since I'm planning on moving to Brazil at some point, I want to learn Brazilian portuguese and not European Portuguese. However, here in Oslo, all I can find are courses in European Portuguese. I know there are many differences (written and spoken) and for that reason, I'm a bit hesitant about signing up for these courses.

I'd really like some opinions about this. Is it a bad idea for me to attend these courses? Would I be able to adjust my pronounciation once I'm in Brazil? Will they understand me? My fiancé is from Brazil and she says she has a hard time understanding people from Portugal.

Looking forward to the input!


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Amy Duncan  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:15
Portuguese to English
+ ...
I wouldn't take the courses Mar 31, 2009

OK, now that's just my opinion, but I find European Portuguese quite different from Brazilian Portuguese in terms of vocabulary, etc., and especially in terms of accent. It's true that there are accent variations here in Brazil as well, but nothing so drastic as the difference between the spoken language in Portugal and Brazil.

I am an American living for around a decade in Brazil, and I find it very difficult to understand spoken European Portuguese. As for the courses (and this is just my opinion, of course), I wouldn't bother with them. I never took any course in Portuguese, and I speak fluently. To me the best way is to grab a grammar book to get a few things straight and then get out in the street and start talking. I think what you're doing now is the best thing...checking out spoken Brazilian Portuguese on the internet. I wouldn't worry about taking any formal courses.


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xxxCarla Queiro  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:15
Online Portuguese course with audio Mar 31, 2009

I found this site which may be useful.

http://www.easyportuguese.com/

Good luck!


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Paul Dixon  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:15
Portuguese to English
+ ...
European vs Brazilian Portuguese Apr 1, 2009

Marius,

Regarding your issue of European Portuguese being understood in Brazil, another point is that some words have completely different meanings (for example "bicha" which in Portugal means a queue, but in Brazil means a homosexual) or have different translations ("comboio" is a train in PT-PT, but a convoy in PT-BR). Other words are completely different, a toilet flush is "descarga" in Brazil and "autoclisma" in Portugal. Not to mention the pronunciation - I have been in Brazil over 40 years and still have difficulty understanding European Portuguese, especially when spoken quickly.

The main differences are that in Portugal the "s" sound is /sh/ while in Brazil it is /s/: for example beaches = praias (BR: /práiass/ PT: /prai'sh/), and that in Portugal vowels are often swallowed: I understand = entendo (BR: /intêndu/ PT: intend'/), to stretch = esticar (BR: /istikar/ PT: /isht'kar/)

So best leave the lessons until you arrive, as there seem to be no Brazilian Portuguese classes where you are. I can suggest some books, but do not think you could buy them over there.

Also, you do not mention where in Brazil you plan to live. The South of Brazil has a large European immigrant population, and this may help you to settle.


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Amy Duncan  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:15
Portuguese to English
+ ...
A bit different in Rio Apr 1, 2009

Paul Dixon wrote:
The main differences are that in Portugal the "s" sound is /sh/ while in Brazil it is /s/: for example beaches = praias (BR: /práiass/ PT: /prai'sh/)


Just so Marius won't be confused, in Rio we have the "carioca" accent, which means we do have the "sh" sound you described, nevertheless Rio Portuguese sounds nothing like European Portuguese!


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Wolf Kux  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:15
Member (2006)
German to Portuguese
+ ...
Brazilian x Portuguese spellings Apr 1, 2009

Marius,

take also a look at the site http://g1.globo.com and at

http://cbn.globoradio.globo.com/comentaristas

where you may hear about brazilian spellings.

I would also like to remember you that there exists very big differences on so called "thinking form" in Brazil x Portugal. Brazilians think in a deductive manner, while portuguese people think on a linear manner.

Those differences appear in form of a wealth of books concerning "piadas de português", jokes about portuguese people. To understand such jokes, you need be very familiar with br. portuguese.

In european portuguese courses, I think, you may not learn brazilian spelling, nor deductive thinking.

Ops, there are not brazilian spellings, but there are different spellings at different regions inside Brazil. Likewise, brazilian cousine does not exist anywhere, but there exists regional cousines, like gaúcha, mineira, nordestina, carioca, amazônica, all of them sold outside Brazil as "brazilian cousine".

As a brazilian citizen, after a 30-60 second long speech from another brazilian citizen, I may find out from where he comes.

Have fun!


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Paul Dixon  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:15
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Brazilian x European Portuguese Apr 1, 2009

Further to my previous posting, I have found a site showing the difference between Lusitanian and Tupiniquim (Brazilian) Portuguese:

http://www.alzirazulmira.com/diferencas.htm


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Same experience with European Portuguese Apr 3, 2009

I have watched Big Brother Brasil a couple of times recently, it is a bit frustrating sometimes. They use so many words that I don't know and which are not in my dictionary. Brazilian Portuguese seems much more active and flexible. At least it is easy to understand in terms of pronunciation.

I am happy to hear though that even Brazilians have problems understanding European Portuguese, I was already starting to doubt my linguistic capabilities I have been here in Portugal for three years now, but sometimes I still get lost in that river of odd consonants. By the time my mind figures out which vowels might have been omitted I have missed the rest of the sentence. I really find it one of the most difficult European languages to understand. The ultimate challenge is live soccer on the radio.

What is meant by deductive vs. linear thinking?

On the site http://www.tvzuka.com/ there are live TV programs from Brazil.

[Edited at 2009-04-03 17:43 GMT]


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Adrias  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:15
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Beautiful and rich site on popular brazilian music / online radio May 19, 2009

Hello,
You can learn a big deal in the site of the radio from Rio de Janeiro called MPB FM. MPB stands for Música Popular Brasileira. It plays mpb all the time and the site itself is rich with interviews with the musicians, and many many different topics and links to other sites related to music, art, festivals, music industry ans so on. They even have a "world" version in English where they play Brazilian Music that foreigners enjoy. The original version in brportuguese plays online exactly what they broadcast in a regular radio.

www.mpbfm.com.br
In Rio it plays at 90.3.
It is great!

There are also thousands of sites of brazilian artists for those who enjoy brazilan music and all of them full of articles about bio, discography and all those interesting things one enjoy to know about their artists. Not to mention the thousand other sites like
www.uol.com.br ( journalistic)
And www.terra.com.br
All of them link you to other things. Like shopping links.
www.shoptime.com.br or www.submarino.com.br where you learn a big deal about the shopping language as to say!! Once you surf a bit some sites they naturally take you to others.
Enjoy all!
Adrias


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:15
English to Portuguese
+ ...
PT x BR reasoning May 19, 2009

Niqui wrote:
What is meant by deductive vs. linear thinking?


I don't think it has so much to do with linearity, unless one considers that the Portuguese take a line as a straight segment between two points, while the Brazilians look for where that line is pointing, disregarding the points themselves.

Nevertheless, I think I covered the difference in logic in the last item of http://www.proz.com/translation-articles/articles/1675/

Sounds pretty simple, but took me decades to figure it out.


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Anthony Baldwin  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 20:15
Member (2006)
Portuguese to English
+ ...
last.fm May 19, 2009

Go to http://www.last.fm and listen to great Brazilian tunes from artists like
Caetano Veloso
Roberto Carlos
Ze Ramalho
Raimundo Fagner
Chico Buarque
Milton Nascimento
Gal Costa
Marisa Monte
Bebel Gilberto
João Paulo e Daniel
Roberta Miranda
Maria Bethania
Rita Lee
Legião Urbana
Barão Vermelho
Os Paralamos de Sucesso
etc., etc.
Look up the lyrics at http://cifras.com.br and sing along!

boa sorte,
tony


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Bruno Magne  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:15
English to French
+ ...
Eu aprendi May 21, 2009

o português do Brazil vendo o Jornal Nacional (na época do Sérgio Chapelin e Cid Moreira) e as novelas da Globo. E posso afirmar, sem falsa modestia, que ninguém me identifica como francês. Para quem fala o alemão, o grande perigo está em confundir o gênero das palavras: exemplos, o porta, o mulher, o criança....

E todos os dias eu lia o jornal Correio do Povo, que era escrito num exclente português brasileiro.

O fato de dominar o Espanhol foi uma grande ajuda.

Escutar rádio ajuda também, desde não que não seja a transmissão de uma partida de futebol.

Sorte

Bruno



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Adrias  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 21:15
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Novelas são ótimas para aprender a falar May 21, 2009

Olá, essa dica de assistir novela para aprender a falar, principalmente se já se está aprendendo a ler e escrever, é ótima.
As novelas da Globo são muitas e mostram muitos personagens de faixa etária diferentes, de classes sociais diferentes, enfim, são muito variados e ajuda muitíssimo a ter uma ótima idéia do português falado no Brasil.
Para assistir pela internet, creio que tem que assinar o Globo.com, para acessar os vídeos.
Aí tem mil novelas online, para ouvir e reouvir e aprender de verdade.
Boa Sorte,
Adrias


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