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Anyone earned their online MA in Translation from this school?
Thread poster: Barbara Cochran, MFA
Barbara Cochran, MFA  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:20
Spanish to English
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Aug 23, 2007

I've done a lot of research on this issue and the only MA in Translation program that is completely online (and that seems reputable) is with the University of West England in Bristol, England. Have any of you gone this route with this particular school? If so , how satisfied were you with their program, from every angle (cost, quality of instruction, etc.)?
Are there other accredited, completely online MA translation programs that I am not aware of out there? If so, with what institutions?


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 03:20
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
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MA or certificate? Aug 23, 2007

femme wrote:
I've done a lot of research on this issue and the only MA in Translation program that is completely online (and that seems reputable) is with the University of West England in Bristol, England.


On their web site they announce it as "MA/Postgraduate Diploma/Postgraduate Certificate". So... what is it? Is it just a certificate or is it really a full Master of Arts degree?


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Amy Williams  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:20
Italian to English
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Certificate OR Diploma OR Masters Aug 23, 2007

Samuel Murray wrote:

On their web site they announce it as "MA/Postgraduate Diploma/Postgraduate Certificate". So... what is it? Is it just a certificate or is it really a full Master of Arts degree?


Hi Samuel,
Over here postgraduate courses often work on a credit system, e.g. 60 credits gives you a postgraduate certificate, 120 a postgraduate diploma and 180 a full masters degree.

So you take as much of the programme as you need/want.

Best,
Amy

[Edited at 2007-08-23 10:30]


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Barbara Cochran, MFA  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:20
Spanish to English
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TOPIC STARTER
Need For Concern Aug 23, 2007

Yes, Samuel-I've noticed that many of these online translation programs are just post-graduate Certificate programs. In the case of the University of Mancester, you can earn the Certficate online but have to be in Manchester to complete the actual Masters.

On other pages on the UWE website, they refer to the MA degree exclusively, without making any mention of a certificate.

I should be able to clarify that this is actually a Masters program, once and for all, by writing back to the school.


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Serena Dorey
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:20
German to English
University of Birmingham might be another option Aug 23, 2007

I don't know about the UWE course but there are other courses out there. I'm just coming to the end of my first year of an MA in Translation Studies from the University of Birmingham. I'm doing this completely by distance learning with no attendance required and I have no complaints about the course so far. I am in touch with a personal tutor once a month (or more frequently if required), receive the course materials online/by post and have access to online resources, such as journals, through the university library. All assignments are submitted electronically too.

On this course, you get the postgraduate certificate or diploma based on how many modules you complete. If you complete all the modules and go on to submit a dissertation you are awarded a full MA.

See: http://www.cels.bham.ac.uk/prospectus/ODL/odltransinfo.htm for more information.

Serena


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Lawyer-Linguist  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 02:20
Dutch to English
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Like Amy says Aug 23, 2007

Samuel Murray wrote:

femme wrote:
I've done a lot of research on this issue and the only MA in Translation program that is completely online (and that seems reputable) is with the University of West England in Bristol, England.


On their web site they announce it as "MA/Postgraduate Diploma/Postgraduate Certificate". So... what is it? Is it just a certificate or is it really a full Master of Arts degree?


Works different in Europe to back home in SA - they are on the ECTS credit system in Europe.

For your own purposes, Samuel, think about the PG certificate and diploma steps as BA (Honours) like we need/needed in SA before getting a Masters.

You can opt out at any stage and also transfer credits from one university to another, in many cases, because most EU universities are on the so-called Bologna system.

Keep well
Debs

[Edited at 2007-08-23 11:51]


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 03:20
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
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What worries me... Aug 23, 2007

Lawyer-Linguist wrote:
You can opt out at any stage and also transfer credits from one university to another, in many cases, because most EU universities are on the so-called Bologna system.


What worries me is how one would determine what is being taught in a course. How would the OP know whether this MA teaches *more* than he had already learnt in his degree at that other university where he had studied)?

I'm asking because I see UNISA has a BA Honnours degree in Translation Studies. This is distance learning, and the degree takes 2 years to complete (a fulltime student would normally finish it in one year). How can one know that this BA Honnours course teaches less than the MA at the English university?

I don't think one can know it. Which brings me to the next question -- does the OP study for a piece of paper or because he wants to get cleverer?


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Lawyer-Linguist  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 02:20
Dutch to English
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Speaking from experience ... Aug 24, 2007

Samuel Murray wrote:

Lawyer-Linguist wrote:
You can opt out at any stage and also transfer credits from one university to another, in many cases, because most EU universities are on the so-called Bologna system.


What worries me is how one would determine what is being taught in a course. How would the OP know whether this MA teaches *more* than he had already learnt in his degree at that other university where he had studied)?

I'm asking because I see UNISA has a BA Honnours degree in Translation Studies. This is distance learning, and the degree takes 2 years to complete (a fulltime student would normally finish it in one year). How can one know that this BA Honnours course teaches less than the MA at the English university?

I don't think one can know it. Which brings me to the next question -- does the OP study for a piece of paper or because he wants to get cleverer?


Hi Samuel,

I did my law degrees at Unisa, have a postgraduate diploma through a Spanish university (relating to translation) - I live close to the Spanish border - and am busy with a Masters through a British university (always a good excuse to pop "home" as I'm from the UK originally).

I can't speak for Unisa now, I graduated in the early 90's, and am very happy at the education I received then (in conjunction with classes from the Department of Justice), however as we both know things have changed in more ways than one.

However, it's my experience that no matter what Unisa teaches or covers, it's not going to be rated full stop. That is my experience in Europe - not that it was relevant for me as I'd decided against mainstream legal practice anyhow, but I know a lot of people who've settled throughout Europe from SA - And the same applies to the States and Canada, I know people who've emigrated to both and despite the assurances of international recognition, at grass roots level the degrees just are not afforded the same status.

I know this isn't a direct answer to your question - I'm just cutting to the chase and saying it ain't worth making the comparison.

And I'm not slagging off the university (or any SA university for that matter), I'm talking in terms of perceptions on the other side of the world, wrong as they may be. Nothing new, we've lived with perceptions, uninformed and otherwise, for years in SA.

As for your second point, that will depend on the person in question. Some people are paper chasers and wouldn't know how to apply their theory to practice if it hit them in the face. Others are serious about CPD (continuous professional development) and know the paper alone is worthless but it's still an important asset if you know what to do with it.


Have a good weekend
Debs

[Edited at 2007-08-24 16:29]


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Caroline Moreno  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:20
Chinese to English
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University of Denver University College Aug 27, 2007

This school offers a new graduate-level translation or interpretation certificate that can be applied to their Masters of Liberal Studies (MLS) program. The whole program can be done completely online and the staff at the school is extremely friendly and helpful. They have several different language pairs. Check it out at:

http://universitycollege.du.edu/grad/modl/degreeplan.cfm?degreeID=342


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 03:20
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
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What is graduate level? Aug 28, 2007

Caroline Moreno wrote:
This school offers a new graduate-level translation or interpretation certificate that can be applied to their Masters of Liberal Studies (MLS) program.


Thanks, Caroline. But for those of us outside the US, could you please explain what "graduate level" means? Does it mean...

* the level just after highschool
* the level just after college
* the level that helps get to the level just after college
* ...?


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Barbara Cochran, MFA  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:20
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks/Graduate School Aug 28, 2007

Thanks, Caroline, for the link to the University of Denver's graduate program. I knew that they had at least a diploma but wasn't sure about the Masters. I have gone ahead and contacted them. I would feel really comfortable about earning a degree from them, not to mention that you say they are friendly and helpful!

In the United States, Samuel, "graduate level" refers to the 2 + years of education after earning the Bachelors in college (after high school). Graduate level studies lead to the MA and sometimes the terminal PhD. Sometimes the studies that lead to the MA are considered "professional studies" here in the USA, i.e., when you learn skills so that you can apply your theoretical knowledge in practice.

[Edited at 2007-08-28 14:01]


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