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EMCI Interpreting courses
Thread poster: eva75

eva75
English
+ ...
Aug 27, 2007

I have been accepted on a masters of interpreting course at a school that is not a member of this new EMCI network.

http://www.emcinterpreting.org/partners.htm

How will this affect my employment opportunities, particularly in EU / international organisations?


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Jonathan Sanders  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:56
Probably not Aug 27, 2007

eva75 wrote:

I have been accepted on a masters of interpreting course at a school that is not a member of this new EMCI network.

http://www.emcinterpreting.org/partners.htm

How will this affect my employment opportunities, particularly in EU / international organisations?


Which school, out of curiosity?


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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:56
Flemish to English
+ ...
My 2 cents Aug 27, 2007

The EMCI was created 10 years ago.
At the E.U. and other international institutions, like the UN (if your country is on the list of those citizens who can participate in the competitions of a particular year), you need at least 2 foreign languages (your profile shows only 1) as B or C-languages.
Nowadays, for whatever position at the E.U. as a staff-employee, you need to succeed the preselection tests first and classify high enough upon the list.
A thorough knowledge of an Eastern-European language or Maltese is an advantage. However, some have been accepted with languages of the "old" member-states as C-languages without an EMCI. If I am not mistaken, the required number of hours of experience must be greater without an EMCI than with and some ex-students of certain schools which do not deliver an EMCI have passed the accreditation tests and the normal exams to become a staff-interpreter.
As everywhere, it is a question of supply and demand. End 2003, there was a big demand for Eastern-European languages.
Also have a look at similar previous questions under "interpreting".




[Edited at 2007-08-27 18:55]

[Edited at 2007-08-27 18:57]


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Paola Dentifrigi  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 21:56
Member (2003)
English to Italian
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Language combination Aug 28, 2007

eva75 wrote:

I have been accepted on a masters of interpreting course at a school that is not a member of this new EMCI network.

http://www.emcinterpreting.org/partners.htm

How will this affect my employment opportunities, particularly in EU / international organisations?



I've done an EMCI and I can tell you that for the EU it's not the EMCI title in itself that matters, but your language combination (eg, at least 3 Cs). You'd better have another C language for the UN as well. For the private market your combination is fine, as long as you can guarantee a retour. Keep all this in mind at the very beginning.

Good luck
Paola


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eva75
English
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TOPIC STARTER
three Cs? Aug 29, 2007

Paola Dentifrigi wrote:

I've done an EMCI and I can tell you that for the EU it's not the EMCI title in itself that matters, but your language combination (eg, at least 3 Cs). You'd better have another C language for the UN as well. For the private market your combination is fine, as long as you can guarantee a retour. Keep all this in mind at the very beginning.

Good luck
Paola


What do you mean by at least three Cs? My C language is German, do you mean I need another two, perhaps Eastern European languages for better employment chances?


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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:56
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
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... Aug 29, 2007

eva75 wrote:

What do you mean by at least three Cs? My C language is German, do you mean I need another two, perhaps Eastern European languages for better employment chances?


The EMCI is a subsidised programme. It's where the EU proposes to guarantee a supply of manpower for its own needs, and hence, requires 2 source languages to make it worth its subsidy.

You do not have to be an EMCI graduate to enter the institutions concerned, but the 2 source-language requirements are part of the qualifications to start processing EU applications at all.

The third C is optional (in fact, you could be talking of Bs), but it gives you an edge to have one.

And since EU needs are currently focused on expansion, there is a stress on east-bloc and new country languages.

It's all circumstantial. Nothing says you can't do well with majority languages, or, for that matter, outside the EU/UN.

At any rate, it's worth investigating the faculty of the school you'll be going to, to see if you can find a good mentor in your combinations, preferrably with active professional connections. All too often, teachers may be teaching because they have not been that active. That will not mean they are not good teachers, but well... experience tells.

[Edited at 2007-08-29 13:11]


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Paola Dentifrigi  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 21:56
Member (2003)
English to Italian
+ ...
Cs Aug 29, 2007

eva75 wrote:

What do you mean by at least three Cs? My C language is German, do you mean I need another two, perhaps Eastern European languages for better employment chances?


I mean the EU hardly takes into account someone with less than 3 Cs. Your A is English, so you can get along even without a new member state language. But you need 3 Cs or a B (I guess a new member state one in this case). However, adding a language is not an easy task, can take years

Don't know if someone gave you this:
http://scic.cec.eu.int/europa/display.jsp?id=c_6328

Cheers
Paola


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Jonathan Sanders  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:56
If you have C German that's enough Aug 31, 2007

Paola Dentifrigi wrote:

eva75 wrote:

What do you mean by at least three Cs? My C language is German, do you mean I need another two, perhaps Eastern European languages for better employment chances?


I mean the EU hardly takes into account someone with less than 3 Cs. Your A is English, so you can get along even without a new member state language. But you need 3 Cs or a B (I guess a new member state one in this case). However, adding a language is not an easy task, can take years

Don't know if someone gave you this:
http://scic.cec.eu.int/europa/display.jsp?id=c_6328

Cheers
Paola



I just wanted to weigh in to say that the English booth at the EU is desperate for passive German. Most English As with German will be retiring soon, and young Brits aren't really learning it anymore because it's considered very difficult. This is in addition to a general drop in language study in the UK, and a consequent future lack of linguists. So, if you are an English native with French and German, and your French is active as well, you actually have a priority language combination for the EU, believe it or not. You are obviously behind those who have passive Eastern European languages, but since that's basically nobody, you're pretty much at the head of the line. The English booth even holds freelance exams for English As with only 2 more common languages so with German, you should have no problem.

No one cares if you have an EMCI or not, what's important is having a respectable interpreting degree, a lot of which are listed at this address:

http://www.aiic.net/schools/ . You can also find on this website the characteristics that make for good training programs and see if your school matches up.

Anyway, whether you have an EMCI or another interpreting school degree, an organization won't hire you before testing you.

And don't forget the non-EU market--there are a ton of of international organizations in Europe that only require bi-active French and English (i.e. NATO, Council of Europe), and that's also a good combination for the private market.

Well, I hope that helped. Good luck and take care.

[Edited at 2007-08-31 20:54]


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eva75
English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
thanks for feedback Sep 3, 2007

Thank you all for your help and explanations!

I don't want to name the school for confidendiality reasons, but I think I will accept the offer, as the employment prospects sound more hopeful for my combination than I'd thought.

Unfortunately, I've tried learning an Eastern European language (Polish) in the past and I was useless. I think I'd be wasting my time trying to learn an exotic language, as it takes too long and I'm not quite as gifted for language learning as I thought. Better stick to what I know, I reckon.

Thanks again.

[Edited at 2007-09-03 22:56]


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