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Thread poster: Mats Wiman
Pronunciation of Haiti

Mats Wiman  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 05:58
Member (2000)
German to Swedish
+ ...

Moderator of this forum
Jan 22, 2010

I just reminded the Swesih Broadcasting Corporation's correpsondent in the US that he had become
americanized in his pronunciation of Haiti.

The Americans (to my ears) say "Heyti" and so did he (He has promised to improve )

I Swedish/Norwegian/Danish it's "Ha-iiti"

How does a Frenchman/German/Spaniard/Italian/XXX say it?

Mats

[Edited at 2010-01-22 12:27 GMT]


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Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 05:58
Member (2006)
Dutch to German
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German Jan 22, 2010

In German, it's Ha-ii-ti, sometimes even with a glottal stop before the "ii".

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Lingua 5B  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:58
English to Croatian
+ ...
French; Serbian/Croatian Jan 22, 2010

The phoneme "h" is never pronounced in French, so it's omitted:

"i - e- tea" or like English letters I.E.T.

In Serbian/Croatian, it's: " Ha- e- t " ( HA. E.T.)


[Edited at 2010-01-22 18:18 GMT]


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David Brown  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 05:58
Spanish to English
Haiti Jan 22, 2010

On Spanish television news it is pronounce like IT -eyti (as in information technology).

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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:58
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
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Afrikaans and South African English Jan 22, 2010


Mats Wiman wrote:
The Americans (to my ears) say "Heyti".


In Afrikaans we say hah-yee-tee, but there is little risk of mispronunciation because we spell it with a diaresis on the "i", i.e. "Haïti". I have heard many South African English television people say it like the Americans, i.e. hey-tee. Do the Australians say "oy-tay"?


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Carla Catolino
Italy
Local time: 05:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
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Italian Jan 22, 2010

Hay-E-ti

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jaymin  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 23:58
Member (2009)
German to Korean
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[extra] korean Jan 22, 2010

'h' is silent, IT like in French and Spanish.

/Hai-chi/ in Japanese, ハイチ


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:58
English to Spanish
+ ...
Spanish Jan 22, 2010

In Spanish it is aye-TEE, with the stress on the last syllable.

With "aye" being the same as the letter "i".

[Editado a las 2010-01-22 15:49 GMT]


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Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:58
Member (2005)
German to English
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You are correct Jan 22, 2010

We Americans do say "Hay-tee."

[Edited at 2010-01-22 16:14 GMT]


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Paul Dixon  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 00:58
Member (2009)
Portuguese to English
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In Portuguese Jan 22, 2010

In Portuguese it is pronounced eye-TEA.

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Katja Schoone  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 05:58
Member (2006)
English to German
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In my humble opinion Jan 22, 2010

this is the last concern of the Haitians, how they are pronounced in different languages.

They urgently require all sorts of help available and no discussions about their being mispronounced.

[Bearbeitet am 2010-01-22 18:47 GMT]


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Lingua 5B  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:58
English to Croatian
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To Katja Jan 23, 2010

Remember, we are discussing a word pronunciation, not the crisis ( a huge difference). As a professional translator, you should be able separate your emotions from a word meaning when analyzing/discussing it linguistically. We have several different threads discussing the crisis, so, Katja, you are practically off-topic.

Say a student of mine approached me today asking me this same question, just like the original poster did. And I answer: "sorry, I can't answer that because there are more important things to be discussed about Haiti currently." What would the student think about me?

I've seen a similar thing with "professional" translators coming to KudoZ asking for vulgarisms in source text to be translated with "nice words", because they have some sort of psychological barrier toward vulgarisms. Yea, very professional.


[Edited at 2010-01-23 00:34 GMT]


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:58
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
When...? Jan 23, 2010


Katja Schoone wrote:
This is the last concern of the Haitians, how they are pronounced in different languages. ... They urgently require all sorts of help available and no discussions about their being mispronounced.


When would it become okay again to discuss the pronunciation of Haiti's name?

Other countries also suffer from crisis, although few nations are currently swooped up in a fund-raising frenzy for those others. But... to be on the safe side, do you know of a list of countries that are sufficiently bad off that they may be considered safely beyond the threshold of discussability?


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Andrea Flaßbeck  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 05:58
Member (2007)
English to German
+ ...
Respect Jan 23, 2010


Lingua 5B wrote:

Say a student of mine approached me today asking me this same question, just like the original poster did. And I answer: "sorry, I can't answer that because there are more important things to be discussed about Haiti currently." What would the student think about me?



[Edited at 2010-01-23 00:34 GMT]


Hi Lingua,

If your student asked how to pronounce Haiti in 20 languages, you could tell him to visit a library, right? And yes, you might remind him that the people in Haiti currently have bigger problems than the pronunciation of Haiti.


Samuel Murray wrote:

Other countries also suffer from crisis, although few nations are currently swooped up in a fund-raising frenzy for those others. But... to be on the safe side, do you know of a list of countries that are sufficiently bad off that they may be considered safely beyond the threshold of discussability?



Hi Samuel,

Sorry, I don't think sarcasm is the right approach, and I don't remember talking about the pronunciation of Mullaitivu or Kilinochchi in 2004 because there are things in life you don't do out of respect for the people involved.

My 2 cents.

Andrea


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:58
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
It could be considered courteous ... Jan 23, 2010

Rather than insulting or unfeeling, it could be considered courteous to enquire as to the correct way of pronouncing the name of that unfortunate country, couldn't it?
I see no reason not to discuss the correct pronunciation of Haiti, or of any other place or person. It is polite to try to pronounce people's names correctly.
Of course we are all appalled at the suffering caused by the earthquake.
Deary me, how utterly PC we are becoming!
In the UK, most people seem to be pronouncing it "HAY-TI", with the stress on the HAY, but I have heard some say "HA-I-TI". In French, of course, the H is not vocalised.
Jenny


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Pronunciation of Haiti






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