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How to go about editing jobs?
Thread poster: Heinrich Pesch

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 08:06
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Mar 28, 2008

I do editing rather seldom. Now I agreed to edit a translation (compare with the original using track changes-feature in Word). There are 100+ pages to read.
I was afraid they would send me pdf of source and target and I would have to read in two windows, but in fact they send me a Word-table with three columns: the segment number, the source segment and the target segment. So that is great. I have the same view like when editing in SDLX.
They wont me also check terminology and send me a terminology table the translator was required to use. Now I probably will use this table to check terminology using Word-search-function.

But I was wondering how do you go about if you get a large file to edit and the source is as a seperate file. Do you print both and read from paper copy, do you read in two windows on-screen or do you align the files first in order to get a table?

What's your working scheme?

Regards
Heinrich


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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 02:06
English to French
+ ...
Align Mar 28, 2008

I align those and turn it into a TM - I know you are not fond of working with CAT tools, but this is my method and it seems to work well. Once I am done creating the TM, I have my CAT tool translate the source document automatically, so I end up with an uncleaned copy. From there on, I open each segment as if I was translating and correct in the target segment. I find this helpful because I can see each source and target sentence next to each other.

What is neat about this is that, if I save the uncleaned document before editing it and then save the edited version under a different name, I can then use ApSic Comparator to make a comparison report of the two, which will only include edited segments and will not include unedited ones, so it will look a lot like the file you describe, with columns for source, target, and even columns for comments. Clients also seem to like such reports as they are much more manageable and you are not even offered the unedited segments so you only get the part of the document that effectively has changed.

The other choice would be to simply align the two documents and correct directly in the aligning software (WinAlign allows this - I don't know about others).

[Edited at 2008-03-28 01:10]


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Graciela Guzman  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 03:06
English to Spanish
+ ...
I print the source text Mar 28, 2008

I'm not very fond of working with CAT tools either, so, if I get a Word file, I just print the source text and work directly on the translation using the track changes function. If there happens to be a glossary, I open it and check terminology using the word search function.

Then, I save the file with the track changes, and I copy it with a different name. I accept all changes to have a clean document and compare one more time.

I guess there are better methods but this is very simple and it works.

Regards,
Graciela

[Edited at 2008-03-28 04:47]


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Charlie Bavington  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:06
French to English
What does the client want? Mar 28, 2008

I would guess that the requirement at least partly determines the method.

If they want a Word doc with tracked changes, I would think the most straightforward method is to either print the source or open the source in one window, and make the amendments on a track-changes version of the document in (another) window. I usually (maybe even always?) have to deliver such a Word document, so I use the two windows method.

If the client just wants a new, clean version of the translation and doesn't care what changes you made, well, I guess pretty much any method you like would be fine.

If they've sent you a 3-column document, I guess that's what they want back. I think I would just work on that directly if that was the case.


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xxxNMR
France
Local time: 07:06
French to Dutch
+ ...
Yes Mar 28, 2008

Charlie Bavington wrote:

I would guess that the requirement at least partly determines the method.

If they want a Word doc with tracked changes, I would think the most straightforward method is to either print the source or open the source in one window, and make the amendments on a track-changes version of the document in (another) window. I usually (maybe even always?) have to deliver such a Word document, so I use the two windows method.

If the client just wants a new, clean version of the translation and doesn't care what changes you made, well, I guess pretty much any method you like would be fine.

If they've sent you a 3-column document, I guess that's what they want back. I think I would just work on that directly if that was the case.

Ask them in the first place if they want you to use track changes or not. Some people prefer another colour, or nothing, and printing houses hate track changes.

I proofread directly on the screen (or on two screens), the original text on the left, and the file to be corrected on the right side. I read two times, one for the sense (is the translation right?) and the second time, after three cups of coffee, for spelling, grammar, missing words and layout.

Aligning everything is very, very time-consuming, and printing everything out too, but if the document is important or if there are many corrections, you'll have to do a last check on a printed-out copy.


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Marie-Hélène Hayles  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:06
Italian to English
+ ...
Depends... Mar 28, 2008

For revisions of a few pages or so, I have them both on the screen (original at top, text for revision underneath). But with longer revisions, or if there are any formatting issues, it's far easier to print out the original for reference.
With most of the stuff I have to revise the original is a scanned PDF, so CAT tools don't enter into it. In other cases I usually get the uncleaned file anyway, so I'll just run through it with WF and revise it segment by segment (in this case not using track changes).


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 08:06
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Victoria's method sounds good Mar 28, 2008

I have finnished now my job, and if I had used Victoria's approach I would have saved some time. But I just corrected the translation and noticed, that there were a lot of repetitions. With a CAT-tool it would have been easier.
Of course I used Search and Replace a lot.
I wonder who put into your head that I don't like CAT-tools? I use Wordfast whenever possible and also Trados and SDLX when necessary.

Probably there are lots of solutions. For large pdfs I probably would decline to edit them in the first place.

Regards
Heinrich


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xxxNMR
France
Local time: 07:06
French to Dutch
+ ...
How about monolingual translation? Mar 28, 2008

Heinrich Pesch wrote:

I have finnished now my job, and if I had used Victoria's approach I would have saved some time. But I just corrected the translation and noticed, that there were a lot of repetitions. With a CAT-tool it would have been easier.
Of course I used Search and Replace a lot.
I wonder who put into your head that I don't like CAT-tools? I use Wordfast whenever possible and also Trados and SDLX when necessary.

Probably there are lots of solutions. For large pdfs I probably would decline to edit them in the first place.

Regards
Heinrich

I am serious. I have one client who always sent me the same kind of documents, translated by the same translator, sometimes with sentences in it which haven't been translated. I use Wordfast for this, (for the whole document), which means that my TM contains EN>NL segments and NL>NL segments. In this way you can always replace the same segment of the other translator by the same segment translated by yourself. And context search is available.


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Johan Kjallman  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:06
Member (2008)
Italian to Swedish
+ ...
Track Changes + checking a lot of terms in clean target files Mar 22, 2011

Hello everyone,

I have been asked by an agency to edit a large volume translation. As it's the first time that I take on such a volume for editing, I would like to ask some advice on how to approach the task. My question is similar to the one Heinrich asked, so I thought I might as well re-open this thread rather then creating a new one.

Here are the conditions for the assignment:
- The text (a few clean doc files) is technical and repetitive
- here is no glossary or TM available, but the client wants me to check that the terminology is coherent with similar translations done in the past (source and target versions available separately)
-I should deliver the file with “Track changes” activated in MS Word

Relevant software that I use:
- MS Word 2003 (and Word 2008 for Mac)
- Trados Freelance suite 2007
- MemoQ 4.5 (will buy this week)
- Apsic Xbench

My main concern is how to check (in an effective way) that the terminology used is consistent and coherent with the reference material?

Though it would be handy (if not essential) to work with bilingual files, and perhaps create a Termbase on-the-fly to verify the terminology, it seems to me like quite a time-consuming hassle to first align all text. Also, as I need to deliver the files with MS Word Track Changes activated (which AFAIK is not compatible with Trados), unfortunately I can't use the methods described above by VictoriaG (“retranslating” the text in Tag Editor and producing a comparison report with Apsic Comparator or doing the corrections in an alignment software).

Considering the repetitive nature of the text, working only with the Search & Replace function in Word with separate source and target files would probably drive me nuts, a part from being very ineffective when it comes to finding inconsistent translations of whole segments (and not only).

I imagine that this scenario happens from time to time for proof-readers, so I'm curious to hear what your approach is.

As I will probably buy MemoQ (Pro edition) this week, one idea to save me some hassle could be to align properly the translated documents, and use on-the-fly alignment for the reference material. I'm not sure though if it's possible to export the alignment directly into a bilingual doc/ttx/etc. file, rather than retranslating the source file with the TM export. The latter approach would be problematic I guess when one source segment has multiple translations (which is likely).

Though I could at least check the terminology, etc. in MemoQ in this way, I would still need to make any changes directly in Word, so it's not an ideal solution at all. I might try to ask the client if it’s possibile to recieve bilingual files from the translator, and/or to deliver a Comparison report rather than a doc with Track Changes, but I need a back-up plan. Any input is very appreciated!

Regards, Johan


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