Names of medicines/drugs
Thread poster: Julia Martínez

Julia Martínez  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 11:56
English to Spanish
+ ...
Apr 10, 2003

Hi! I\'ve received my first medical translation Sp>Eng and I\'d like to know whether names of medicines or drugs (eg Lanoxin, Azantac etc) are translated or not.

Thanks for your help.





Direct link Reply with quote
 

AAAmedical  Identity Verified
Belgium
Local time: 16:56
English to Dutch
+ ...
yes and no Apr 10, 2003

Hello,



Names of medicine are not really translated but a certain medicine registered under the name X in a country can be registered under a name Y in another country (although same molecule, same company).



I guess you have to take these differences into account.



Regards



Ann


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julia Martínez  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 11:56
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
thank you very much, Ann Apr 11, 2003

Quote:


On 2003-04-10 23:54, AAAmedical wrote:

Hello,



Names of medicine are not really translated but a certain medicine registered under the name X in a country can be registered under a name Y in another country (although same molecule, same company).



I guess you have to take these differences into account.



Regards



Ann



Direct link Reply with quote
 
xima  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:56
English to Catalan
+ ...
Generics are usually preferred Apr 11, 2003

Hello,



whenever I translate a medical text, I\'m usually asked to use the generic name.

If not, what I do is use the same trade name as in the original and include the generic name in brackets.





For instance:



... the use of Ativan is recomended in etc etc...

... es recomendable el uso de Ativan (lorazepam) en etc etc..



... if taking Nuprin, the patient etc etc

... si toma Nuprin (ibuprofeno), el paciente etc etc



Hope it helps.



Xima


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xima  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:56
English to Catalan
+ ...
Generics are usually preferred Apr 11, 2003

Hello,



whenever I translate a medical text, I\'m usually asked to use the generic name.

If not, what I do is use the same trade name as in the original and include the generic name in brackets.





For instance:



... the use of Ativan is recomended in etc etc...

... es recomendable el uso de Ativan (lorazepam) en etc etc..



... if taking Nuprin, the patient etc etc

... si toma Nuprin (ibuprofeno), el paciente etc etc



Hope it helps.



Xima



NOTE: YOU WILL FIND QUITE A LOT OF CORRESPONDENCES IN

http://www.gitt.org/files/gitt_glossary.doc



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julia Martínez  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 11:56
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Xima! You've been very helpful! Apr 12, 2003

Quote:


On 2003-04-11 18:24, xima wrote:

Hello,



whenever I translate a medical text, I\'m usually asked to use the generic name.

If not, what I do is use the same trade name as in the original and include the generic name in brackets.





For instance:



... the use of Ativan is recomended in etc etc...

... es recomendable el uso de Ativan (lorazepam) en etc etc..



... if taking Nuprin, the patient etc etc

... si toma Nuprin (ibuprofeno), el paciente etc etc



Hope it helps.



Xima



NOTE: YOU WILL FIND QUITE A LOT OF CORRESPONDENCES IN

http://www.gitt.org/files/gitt_glossary.doc





Direct link Reply with quote
 

Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.)  Identity Verified
Thailand
Local time: 21:56
Member (2004)
English to Thai
+ ...
Drug label Oct 8, 2010

Last week I went to hospital and got some medicines. The labels were totally written in generic names. These are better for pharmacist and patients to know what will be taken even during travelling abroad. It is very convenient now.

Soonthon Lupkitaro


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Mesut Yaşar  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:56
Turkish to English
+ ...
Both Nov 8, 2010

I prefer to translate and write the original in parenthesises. Same goes for books, publishings etc.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Catherine GUILLIAUMET  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:56
English to French
+ ...
The standard, the INNs and the WHO's lists Feb 12, 2011

Hi,
The standard is to use the INN (International Nonproprietary Name).

I mean that if, in a document to be translated, only the trade name in mentioned, for instance
"Thingy ®", the standard is to keep the trade name used in the original, followed by the INN within brackets : e.g. "Thingy ® (aspirin)".

Note that the INN is localized, according to the target language/country, i.e. according to the USAN, BAN, DCI, etc.
In the example above, in French it will be "Thingy ® (aspirine)".

Last point : note that the translator is neither supposed nor expected to look the national equivalent trade names up. In fact, indicating a supposed equivalent could even be harmful, as the suggested substitute medicine might not be a true equivalent (slightly different dosage, composition, action or effects, etc.)

Important : Hereafter, the URL to access the Lists of the Proposed and Recommended INNs, published (in 4 languages : Latin, EN, FR, ES) and updated by the WHO :

http://www.who.int/medicines/publications/druginformation/innlists/en/

Those lists also show the molecular formulae in EN, FR and ES. plus the graphic formulae.

Catherine


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:56
Spanish to English
+ ...
Depends whose English it's going into Feb 13, 2011

Be aware that the U.S. does not always recognize the international non-proprietary name. So, for instance, the drug that pretty much everyone else in the world calls paracetamol is called acetaminophen in the U.S.

This happens with a some other drugs as well. So if you're translating for the U.S., be sure to use FDA-approved terminology.

[Edited at 2011-02-13 06:26 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Catherine GUILLIAUMET  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:56
English to French
+ ...
Is there a list of FDA/INNs names equivalents ? Feb 13, 2011

Steven Capsuto wrote:

Be aware that the U.S. does not always recognize the international non-proprietary name. So, for instance, the drug that pretty much everyone else in the world calls paracetamol is called acetaminophen in the U.S.

This happens with a some other drugs as well. So if you're translating for the U.S., be sure to use FDA-approved terminology.

[Edited at 2011-02-13 06:26 GMT]


Hi Steven,

Thank you for your imput.

Can you tell us if there is - and where to find, if any - a list of the official equivalents between the WHO's INNs and the FDA's approved names ?

Secondly, am I wrong to assume that a European translator who translates into EN a pharmaceutical document for an US client, using an INN instead of an FDA name shouldn't be considered as heavily at fault ? I think that in any case, the WHO is an authority which outweighs the FDA at the global level, being a branch of the UNO.

I never translate into EN, but I'm very curious.

Have a nice day
Catherine


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Emma Goldsmith  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 16:56
Member (2010)
Spanish to English
off topic about EN translators Feb 13, 2011

Catherine GUILLIAUMET wrote:

a European translator who translates into EN a pharmaceutical document for an US client


This sort of problem illustrates why I don't translate into US English (I'm a UK English speaker). It's not just a question of spelling differences. I will do so if pressed, but then I insist that the proofreader should be a US English speaker.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:56
Spanish to English
+ ...
Purpose of the translation Feb 13, 2011

Catherine GUILLIAUMET wrote:

Secondly, am I wrong to assume that a European translator who translates into EN a pharmaceutical document for an US client, using an INN instead of an FDA name shouldn't be considered as heavily at fault ?


If you're translating official drug fact sheets or packaging for use in the U.S., failure to use FDA terminology can cause legal problems (which I assume the pharma company's lawyers would spot before the text goes to the print shop). I think the same issues apply when translating into Spanish for Puerto Rico: there's official U.S. Spanish nomenclature for that market.

The easiest way to find the U.S. drug names is to do a Google search for the INN name and limit the search to fda.gov. IIRC, the FDA's online fact sheets about approved drugs give the U.S. name as the page header but also list foreign names. Also, Wikipedia pages about specific drugs usually list both the INN and FDA names, which can then be confirmed by searching the FDA website.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Catherine GUILLIAUMET  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:56
English to French
+ ...
Thank you, Steven Feb 14, 2011

Thank you for those very good tips.

A good idea to mention the U.S. Spanish nomenclature for Puerto Rico. I always forget that this is not an independant state, and I suppose that I'm not the only one in Europe who think so.

Your tips may also be useful to those translating in the other direction.

Catherine


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Names of medicines/drugs

Advanced search







memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »
Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs