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credentials through testing?
Thread poster: Laura Allison Pomenta
Laura Allison Pomenta  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:30
English to Spanish
+ ...
Dec 3, 2008

Hi, In order to complete my profile and have a higher ranking, and even be able to quote to some restricted jobs, I would need to complete the "credentials" section. But I'm a bit confused: does this refer only to credentials specifically on the field of translating, or can these refer to your BA or postgraduate studies not related to translation, but which are part of your fields of expertise?

If it is resticted to translation-specific credentials I would like to know if there is some sort of test, which would save me four more years of study in order to obtain translating credentials. I have invested 7 years of study in different areas and I don't have time to invest in more...I need to earn money now!!!I have for example, proofreadand copyedited a translation from a company who boasted about having ISO quality cert. and bla bla bla, and that text was full of mistakes. Some pages required me to redo them completely!!! So in my opinion credentials don' t guarantee a thing.... But I can't quote for certain jobs beause I lack specific translating credentials. Any suggestions?

[Edited at 2008-12-03 23:03 GMT]


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Ali Bayraktar  Identity Verified
Turkey
Member (2007)
English to Turkish
+ ...
Just enter there your credentials! Dec 3, 2008

Hello,
For now, you can just enter there the short name of your credential (Profile updater/language pairs/add credentials)

In future if you wish them to be verified by site, you can follow the instructions listed here: http://www.proz.com/?sp=faq#credential_verified

As far as I know, there is not any restriction regarding that they are verified by site or not.

So, just report it in your profile, verification is up to you

Regards,


[Edited at 2008-12-03 23:12 GMT]


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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 16:30
English to French
+ ...
Credentials vs. diplomas Dec 4, 2008

I think there may be a misunderstanding about what credentials mean.

Credentials usually don't include diplomas. Rather, they include certification. If you are officially certified in anything, that's what you would add there. A good example - at least, the most widespread one on this site - is ATA certification in XYZ language pair. In other words, if you have a title (doctor XYZ, master XYZ, etc., certified transator, certified engineer, certified nurse, etc.), then you have credentials. It is possible to have a portfolio of successful university studies without having any credentials.

For example, I am a certified fit tester for respiratory protection, so I could include that - but I seriously doubt it would have any meaning as it pertains to translation, so I didn't add it. It's on my oldfashioned resume, though - in case I wanted to apply for a job with health and safety functions, it probably would be useful. The same way, I am sure there are a bunch of people here certified in first aid, as lifeguards, etc., but these are not pertinent here. Might I add that being certified in something doesn't mean you have any kind of diploma in it, or that certification requires any graduate studies. This also applies to ATA certification - many of our ATA certified colleagues haven't studied translation, and some haven't even been to university.

Of course, within the credentials section, it is wise to add any credential you may have even outside the field of translation and interpreting, as long as you feel it has to do with your translation activities and will be viewed as pertinent by your potential clients.

[Edited at 2008-12-04 07:15 GMT]


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Tomás Cano Binder, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:30
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Some certifying associations and institutes Dec 4, 2008

Laura Allison Pomenta wrote:
If it is resticted to translation-specific credentials I would like to know if there is some sort of test, which would save me four more years of study in order to obtain translating credentials.


There are several bodies and associations who offer a certification system recognised in the world of translation and officially. You may want to visit the sites of:
- US: American Translators Association
- UK: Institute of Translation and Interpreting
- UK: Institute of Chartered Linguists
- Canada: Canadian Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters Council (CTIC)

They have different requirements. For instance, the ITI in the UK requires you to have a degree in some specialty, as well as proven experience in translation. The ATA does not require a degree, but if you don't have one you must be able to prove at least 5 years of translation work for several customers. The customers must certify in written that you have worked for them over that time and to their satisfaction.

After being a full-time (in the many senses of the expression) translator with no credential as a translator (I did have one in English language by Cambridge University) for over a decade, I had the same situation and concerns. After registering as an ATA member I did my ATA certification exam back in August and recently received the news about my passing of the exam.

Thus, I sincerely encourage you to research your options and do the exams. If you decide to go ahead, do prepare yourself well in the source and target languages (grammar, spelling, cognates, international versions of your language...) as the texts are full of little pitfalls and tricks, not very different from what we encounter in our everyday work though.

Good luck!


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KSL Berlin  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 21:30
Member (2003)
German to English
+ ...
On the contrary! Dec 4, 2008

Viktoria Gimbe wrote:
For example, I am a certified fit tester for respiratory protection, so I could include that - but I seriously doubt it would have any meaning as it pertains to translation, so I didn't add it.


I've had a number of translation jobs for chemical safety where that would be relevant. I wouldn't make such an assumption. If a translator were needed for French to handle such specialized instructions, you'd be the automatic winner with that background.

[Edited at 2008-12-04 09:00 GMT]


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Tomás Cano Binder, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:30
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
I would add it Dec 4, 2008

Viktoria Gimbe wrote:
For example, I am a certified fit tester for respiratory protection, so I could include that - but I seriously doubt it would have any meaning as it pertains to translation, so I didn't add it.


I agree with Kevin. I would add it. I am convinced that there are plenty of jobs about industrial safety out there and this data could be relevant for some potential customers. I assume you do translate about industry and personal safety equipment every now and then, so it does make perfect sense to me to add the credential.


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Miroslav Jeftic  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:30
English to Serbian
+ ...
But... Dec 4, 2008

Kevin Lossner wrote:

Viktoria Gimbe wrote:
For example, I am a certified fit tester for respiratory protection, so I could include that - but I seriously doubt it would have any meaning as it pertains to translation, so I didn't add it.


I've had a number of translation jobs for chemical safety where that would be relevant. I wouldn't make such an assumption. If a translator were needed for French to handle such specialized instructions, you'd be the automatic winner with that background.

[Edited at 2008-12-04 09:00 GMT]


I checked the FAQ and it says:

ProZ.com verifies language-related credentials reported by ProZ.com members.


So, it seems only language-related certification can be verified, not every kind of certification.

[Edited at 2008-12-04 12:07 GMT]


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Tomás Cano Binder, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:30
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
That does not keep you from... Dec 4, 2008

Miroslav Jeftic wrote:
So, it seems only language-related certification can be verified, not every kind of certification.


OK, but that does not keep you from adding any credentials you consider interesting to describe your abilities, I reckon.


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Sebastian Witte  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:30
Member (2004)
German to English
+ ...
Reply to Viktoria's post Dec 4, 2008

[quote]Viktoria Gimbe wrote:

I think there may be a misunderstanding about what credentials mean.

Credentials usually don't include diplomas. Rather, they include certification. If you are officially certified in anything, that's what you would add there. A good example - at least, the most widespread one on this site - is ATA certification in XYZ language pair. In other words, if you have a title (doctor XYZ, master XYZ, etc., certified transator, certified engineer, certified nurse, etc.), then you have credentials. It is possible to have a portfolio of successful university studies without having any credentials.
___________________
From ProZ FAQ:
9.1 - What is a "credential"?

Various associations, schools and other bodies around the world offer to translators what ProZ.com generally refers to as "credentials". These may include "certifications", "degrees" or other forms of qualification.

This shows Viktoria must be wrong.


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Tomás Cano Binder, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:30
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
ISO quality not necessarily good quality Dec 4, 2008

Laura Allison Pomenta wrote:
I have for example, proofreadand copyedited a translation from a company who boasted about having ISO quality cert. and bla bla bla, and that text was full of mistakes. Some pages required me to redo them completely!!! So in my opinion credentials don' t guarantee a thing...


Well, an ISO quality system in place only guarantees that the company follows specific, standardised, documented, repeatable, traceable, officially audited steps in the process of producing a translation. It does not mean that the translation will be a good one. Many ISO-certified companies have such a high overhead that they need to hire bad translators, bad reviewers, bad proofreaders. All members of the process comply with the system, but if all of them are not careful enough... the end product is quite bad even with an ISO scheme in place.

As for translator credentials, I think that people who are certified translators can be expected to deliver a reasonable quality as long as they work in their areas of specialty. And any company hiring them will enjoy the edge of delivering reasonably good translations even without an ISO scheme in place, and even without the editor and the proofreader.


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Cristina Lo Bianco  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 22:30
Member (2008)
English to Italian
+ ...
Do degrees in subjects other than translation count as "credentials"? Dec 4, 2008

I'm sorry, but I'm getting a bit confused about what is "credentials" and what is not.

I have a degree in physics (5 years) from an italian university, and physics is one of my work fields: can I put that in the "credentials" section of my Proz profile?

Ciao, ciao,
Cristina


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KSL Berlin  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 21:30
Member (2003)
German to English
+ ...
I don't see why not Dec 4, 2008

Cristina Lo Bianco wrote:
I have a degree in physics (5 years) from an italian university, and physics is one of my work fields: can I put that in the "credentials" section of my Proz profile?


Since it's obviously relevant to your working fields, I think it would be wise to do so. ProZ apparently only verifies translated-related credentials - it makes sense to limit the bottomless pit of effort - but so what? Scan your degree certificate and put a link to it if you like.

If I have a geology text to translate, it's nice to know that I may have it done by a working translator with a degree in geology whatever his or her credentials as a translator may be. I think it certainly beats someone who studied to be an interpreter and just likes rocks in this case. Unless maybe he's been collecting them fanatically and reading all the technical literature too.


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Jared Tabor
Local time: 17:30
SITE STAFF
Translation-related credentials and credentials which make you stronger as a translator Dec 4, 2008

Hello all,

Nice discussion, and I see where there can be some confusion regarding credentials and what to declare in your profile.

Translation-related credentials can readily be declared and verified in your profile. But, as has been mentioned, there may be other types of credentials which, while not directly related to translation, do make you stronger as a translator. Your profile has a field for "Education", where such degrees can be declared. An option may be to allow for the declaration of more than one degree (at the moment only the highest degree achieved is requested), and to allow degrees declared in this field to be verified. How would this work?

Best regards,

Jared


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KSL Berlin  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 21:30
Member (2003)
German to English
+ ...
It makes sense to consider all degrees & credentials Dec 4, 2008

Jared wrote:
An option may be to allow for the declaration of more than one degree (at the moment only the highest degree achieved is requested), and to allow degrees declared in this field to be verified. How would this work?


Only having one official degree, I never noticed this limitation, but I'm a bit appalled to see that it exists. There are double and triple undergraduate majors, people who collect various relevant or irrelevant masters degrees, etc. It would be a shame if the listing of a J.D. would squeeze out the MBA and the degree in electrical engineering one might have, all of which could be relevant to a particular assignment. So by all means - remove this limitation and possibly consider the addition of minor subjects.

So where would welding certificates go? Or licensing as a plumber? (I don't think there are many plumber/translators out there, but if I had a sanitary piping catalog to do, I might consider using one.)


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Cristina Lo Bianco  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 22:30
Member (2008)
English to Italian
+ ...
"Education field" in the profile?! Dec 4, 2008

Jared wrote:

Your profile has a field for "Education", where such degrees can be declared.


In my profile I can only find a "Translation education" field (empty), there's no"Education" field... Maybe there is a different between "old" and "new" profiles?
Anyway, as a result, the only place where you can read about my degree is in my CV.

Ciao,
Cristina


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