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English Teaching via Voice Chat: anyone get the point?
Thread poster: Steffen Pollex
Steffen Pollex  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:12
English to German
+ ...
Apr 14, 2002

http://www.proz.com/job/?id=20800



English Teaching via Voice Chat





English>Russian







We have a voice chat community in Brazil with 250,000 users registered...most of whom do not speak English but wish that they did, and are willing to pay to receive English instruction.



Classes will be offered at 21h-24h Brasil time (when we have our peak usage).



We would prefer non-Portuguese speaking teachers, preferably from Russia. Payment via Paypal.



If you are interested, we invite you to download our software at http://www.tivejo.com; please send: (a) brief summary of your teaching experience; (b) voice recording (20 secs) with your voice; (c) ideas on how an English course could be taught online.



We will expect you to prepare your own materials, directly on our web site, using basic HTML, and conduct the courses on a timely fashion.



Class size will probably be 10 students per class, but you can teach more than 1 class, depending on demand. As the number of students & classes increases, so will the remuneration. Classes should meet 2/week for 1 hour per time, so each class will be 8 hours per month.



Classes will be offered beginning in June. We will select teachers in April, and the teachers will have 1 month to put the content together into a web format.





Beispieltext (den Bieter übersetzen müssen)



Please submit a recorded voice sample IN ENGLISH on the following text:



\"Employers must devote significant attention and resources to complying with a sometimes bewildering array of overlapping state and federal statues, regulations, and common-law principles that govern their relations with their employees\"



I am just wondering and asking all of you: What would be the point in inviting a language teacher for English from Russia to teach peole in Portugal a language he does not know? My experience proofs that the level of English teaching in Russia is yet hairrising. Moreover, they did not even indicate into what language to translate the sample text. I did a translation into Russian, for fun, of course. Absolutely unprofessional! Payment through Paypal makes it even more suspicious. Beware, I would say.





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Klaus Dorn
Local time: 18:12
German to English
+ ...
I know what the point is... Apr 14, 2002

Stephen, maybe you didn\'t read this whole thing properly:



The idea is this: People in Brazil are being taught English by a non-native English teacher, preferably from Russia. I think, picking the country was just a calculation exercise with regards to how much such a lesson would be. Generally rates in Eastern Europe are much cheaper, of course, as you correctly stated, the quality will be somewhat questionable.



Now, the Russian teacher comes on-line and speaks to the Brazilian students.



I\'m a member of a similar scheme already - here the teacher waits on the Internet until a pupil is available or vice versa. The good thing is, the teacher gets paid a low rate while waiting and a high rate when teaching actually takes place.



I\'m planning to run a similar scheme here in Turkey myself as increasingly people want teaching at odd hours and with irregular intervals, so it is ideal for the ever-so-busy business person.



You will notice a vast increase in on-line teaching over the next few months.



By the way, the text was not to be translated, but to be spoken (recorded) and to be sent to the company offering the teaching.


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Ursula Peter-Czichi  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:12
German to English
+ ...
This is yet another strange job offer Apr 14, 2002

A Portugese speaking public -


A Russian English teacher -


+ A Magician: to write an interactive language course in BASIC HTML!


Marvelous!


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Silvina Beatriz Codina  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 12:12
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Maybe we should start giving out awards Apr 14, 2002

Like, the Strangest Job Offer Award. I\'m surprised at the level of creativity of this category\'s contestants.



I hope nobody gets me wrong, but if this kind of fun and games keep up, this site will become unusable, both for translators and for outsourcers.



In another forum someone suggested that outsourcers should pay to post job offers; I am not sure about this, but I think that at least job offers should be screened by someone. Aren\'t forum postings screened? So...

[ This Message was edited by: on 2002-04-14 14:48 ]


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Henry Dotterer
Local time: 11:12
SITE FOUNDER
many site members have teaching experience Apr 14, 2002

Having accomplished some degree of bidder screening, job screening is something we are now considering implementing.



However, even if we had screened the posting about language teaching via voice chat, we would have allowed it to pass through. Our surveys show that a significant percentage of our community has taught in the past, and a significant percentage is interested in further work of this sort.



Whether the company in question is reputable or not, and whether the pay is sufficient or not, is a separate matter. As always, you should exercise as much care in qualifying this client as you would with any client you meet remotely. Payment, etc., is subject to your personal rates and further negotiation directly with the client.


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Silvina Beatriz Codina  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 12:12
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
That's great news about screening, Henry Apr 14, 2002

I hope you\'ll be able to implement soon some kind of job offer screening. In another thread there was a discussion about agencies wasting their time when they receive bids that do not apply (say, bids from people who live in Canada for an offer that specifically ask for someone living in Mexico). But, what about the freelancers\' time? Our time is precious enough, because we are usually quite busy. And we also receive, all day long, job offers that go straight to the trash can. In the best of cases, they are just confusing or incomplete, with no wordcount or deadline provided, no information about the subject matter, or about the oursourcer; or, they do not apply to our profile: I often read through a job offer to find in the end that the translator must live in Spain (I live in Argentina) or that they should translate into European Spanish (I translate into LA Spanish). In the worst of cases they are plain ridiculous, demanding impossible deadlines or offering impossible rates, or they are downright fishy, or simply not serious, like the one posted some time ago by someone who wanted to know how to say \"hi\" in different languages, or people who are seeking themselves a job (I had two of these in the last three days). If you had some kind of system to filter the non-legit offers, or to request more information from an outsourcer if not enough info is given, that would be an excellent way to improve the quality of bids.



Regarding this particular job, it is perfectly true that many translators also teach. Also, a translator can very well collaborate with the elaboration of a foreign language system; nothing wrong with that (I have done that myself). The problem here is that, for some reason we cannot fathom, they are asking for Russian teachers to prepare English courses for a Portuguese-speaking audience. This is very odd to say the least. Maybe this is simply a case of an outsourcer who has not made himself clear enough. But anyway, it sounds \"off,\" and it is not the kind of offer I\'d be ready to respond to.



Well, anyway I\'m not Russian, so, although I speak both English and Portuguese, I don\'t qualify!





[ This Message was edited by: on 2002-04-14 17:13 ]


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Henry Dotterer
Local time: 11:12
SITE FOUNDER
you are right Apr 16, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-04-14 17:05, Beatriz2 wrote:

I hope you\'ll be able to implement soon some kind of job offer screening. In another thread there was a discussion about agencies wasting their time when they receive bids that do not apply (say, bids from people who live in Canada for an offer that specifically ask for someone living in Mexico). But, what about the freelancers\' time? Our time is precious enough, because we are usually quite busy. And we also receive, all day long, job offers that go straight to the trash can...



If you had some kind of system to filter the non-legit offers, or to request more information from an outsourcer if not enough info is given, that would be an excellent way to improve the quality of bids.





Yes, we are in total agreement.

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