Mobile menu

Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
ProZ The Translators Workplace - bad example?
Thread poster: Jack Doughty

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:19
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Feb 20, 2006

Surely we of all people should be using apostrophes correctly?

It should be "The Translators' Workplace".

See http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1261372


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Joanna Borowska  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 04:19
English to Polish
I noticed that, too Feb 20, 2006

but as a non-native English speaker I was too shy to raise this problem

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Noelia Ruiz Pérez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 04:19
Member (2010)
English to Spanish
Keywords Feb 20, 2006

It might have something to do with keywords, search engines etc. It might be easy to get a hit if you search for translators. It is all a Google thing!

Direct link Reply with quote
 

PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:19
English to Polish
+ ...
Choices Feb 20, 2006

How about The Translator's Workplace - speaking of the proverbial translator?



Cheers,
Pawel Skalinski


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:19
Flemish to English
+ ...
Confusing Feb 20, 2006

If there is one rule of English grammar, I have a problem with, it's the Norman and Saxon Genetive. I already posted a topic on it (proz.com/topic/40771) , but did not get a conclusive answer to the question when I have to add an ' or an 's'. Being native did not seem to make a difference here,because native speakers could not agree on the matter.

[Edited at 2006-02-20 12:23]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Aurora Humarán  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 23:19
English to Spanish
+ ...
same here Feb 20, 2006

Williamson wrote:

If there is one rule of English grammar, I have a problem with, it's the Norman and Saxon Genetive. I already posted a topic on it (proz.com/topic/40771) , but did not get a conclusive answer to the question when I have to add an ' or an 's'. Being native did not seem to make a difference here,because native speakers could not agree on the matter.



See if I can find my question in the KudoZ section a couple of years ago.

Au


Direct link Reply with quote
 

PCovs
Denmark
Local time: 04:19
Member (2003)
English to Danish
+ ...
For William, and other interested parties Feb 20, 2006

Williamson wrote:

If there is one rule of English grammar, I have a problem with, it's the Norman and Saxon Genetive. I already posted a topic on it (proz.com/topic/40771) , but did not get a conclusive answer to the question when I have to add an ' or an 's'. Being native did not seem to make a difference here,because native speakers could not agree on the matter.

[Edited at 2006-02-20 12:23]


I just came across this site:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A586640

which should explain in detail how to use the 's' correctly in UK and US English.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:19
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks to Pcovs for link. Feb 20, 2006

Thank you! According to Pcovs' source (hope I got that apostrophe right!), in both Britain and the USA, the genitive case plural is the same. If a word ends in the letter 's', or if the final sound in the word is a 'hiss', an apostrophe with no 's' is added to indicate the noun case. The trophy belongs to the heroes, so it is the heroes' trophy. The Centre for the Fine Arts is dedicated to the Arts, so it is the Fine Arts' Centre. The lounge used by the schoolmistresses is the schoolmistresses' lounge.

But as this is a UK source, maybe native US-English speakers will disagree with it!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
John Bowden  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:19
German to English
Translator's Feb 20, 2006

PAS wrote:

How about The Translator's Workplace - speaking of the proverbial translator?



Cheers,
Pawel Skalinski


I agree - this sounds preferable to me. If we take a word with an irregular plural, the singular version sounds much more natural: e.g. "B&Q - The Handyman's First Choice" rather than "..the handymen's..." etc.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 04:19
French to English
+ ...
while I agree entirely.... Feb 20, 2006

I offer the following as food for thought.
I recently wrote a text in which there was a reference to the UNECE. I wrote it in full with "Nation's" for the "N".
I was criticised by everyone who read the text for being over-fussy and told to take the apostrophe out...

Their argument was that even the UN doesn't use it!
see the UN website:

United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Official Web Site.
www.unece.org/

How can you stand up for what is good and right when the whole world seemingly wants to do you down (joke)!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
PB Trans

Local time: 03:19
French to English
+ ...
That's right, Jack Feb 20, 2006

Jack Doughty wrote:

Thank you! According to Pcovs' source (hope I got that apostrophe right!), in both Britain and the USA, the genitive case plural is the same. If a word ends in the letter 's', or if the final sound in the word is a 'hiss', an apostrophe with no 's' is added to indicate the noun case. The trophy belongs to the heroes, so it is the heroes' trophy. The Centre for the Fine Arts is dedicated to the Arts, so it is the Fine Arts' Centre. The lounge used by the schoolmistresses is the schoolmistresses' lounge.

But as this is a UK source, maybe native US-English speakers will disagree with it!


In London, I see this error very often. I don't think the tube stations with the names Earl's Court and Barons Court make it any easier for people to understand. Shouldn't it be Baron's Court? Or if the name is Barons (with an "s"), then shouldn't it be Barons' Court? And why is it Devons Road? No wonder people are confused!

Slightly off topic here, but I still laugh everytime I hear mention of the "Barking Train". Arf arf!

[Edited at 2006-02-20 14:07]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

justin C
United States
Local time: 22:19
English
Search engines don't like the apostrophe in 'The Translators Workplace' Feb 20, 2006

So it was not included for search engine reasons.

Hope that explains it!

Best Regards,
Justin


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Balasubramaniam L.  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 07:49
Member (2006)
English to Hindi
+ ...
One can't mangle languages just because a machine can't handle it... Feb 20, 2006

justin wrote:

(Search engines don't like apostrophes....)

So it was not included...
Justin


Hi Justin,

You can't be serious! One can't mangle linguistic rules just because a machnie can't handle them!

In that case, why not chose a grammatically correct phrase that doesn't have the apostrophe, such as:

"The Workplace for Translators"

or some such line?

Best regards,
Bala


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 04:19
French to English
+ ...
then it should be.... Feb 20, 2006

The Translator Workplace

and you avoid the problem altogether

(a sort of collective singular)


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Sara Freitas
France
Local time: 04:19
French to English
UN not the same as translators' or translator's Feb 20, 2006

CMJ_Trans wrote:

I offer the following as food for thought.
I recently wrote a text in which there was a reference to the UNECE. I wrote it in full with "Nation's" for the "N".
I was criticised by everyone who read the text for being over-fussy and told to take the apostrophe out...

Their argument was that even the UN doesn't use it!
see the UN website:

United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Official Web Site.
www.unece.org/

How can you stand up for what is good and right when the whole world seemingly wants to do you down (joke)!


UN is used as a modifier. Shouldn't be a possessive in this case, I'm afraid. You wouldn't say the "European Union's Commission on X" but rather the "European Union Commission on X" for instance.

Also "Nation's" would refer to one nation, not the "United Nations" the organization.

Regard's (joking),

Sara

[Edited at 2006-02-20 15:19]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

ProZ The Translators Workplace - bad example?

Advanced search






PDF Translation - the Easy Way
TransPDF converts your PDFs to XLIFF ready for professional translation.

TransPDF converts your PDFs to XLIFF ready for professional translation. It also puts your translations back into the PDF to make new PDFs. Quicker and more accurate than hand-editing PDF. Includes free use of Infix PDF Editor with your translated PDFs.

More info »
memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs