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Russian space dog
Thread poster: Angel Llacuna

Angel Llacuna  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:27
English to Spanish
Nov 30, 2004

can anybody help to translate the following Russian text into English. I appears on the back of a photo showing a Russian astronaut dog:



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xxxIreneN
United States
Local time: 13:27
English to Russian
+ ...
You are welcome:-) Nov 30, 2004

[quote]galone_es wrote:

can anybody help to translate the following Russian text into English. I appears on the back of a photo showing a Russian astronaut dog:
quote]

Picture No.
October, 1959
Moscow

Space Explorers

Everything Is Ready For Launch (literary the Russian word is 'flight' but in this context I would not hesitate to use 'launch' even for a paying customer:-))

Picture taken by L. Porter
News Photography, TASS (Information Agency of the Soviet Union)



Best regards,
Irina (This part is not on the picture:-)



[Edited at 2004-11-30 19:14]


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Angel Llacuna  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:27
English to Spanish
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Nov 30, 2004

Thank you very much Ilina for your help. I am doing some research on Russian space dogs.

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Alexander Demyanov
Local time: 14:27
English
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photograph by ... Nov 30, 2004

That seems to be the standard phrase outside of ditionaries.

Also, just "Ready for launch" would convey as much info as "Everything is ready for launch" and (to me) seems more suitable for a photo caption.

[quote]IreneN wrote:

galone_es wrote:

can anybody help to translate the following Russian text into English. I appears on the back of a photo showing a Russian astronaut dog:
quote]

Picture No.
October, 1959
Moscow

Space Explorers

Everything Is Ready For Launch (literary the Russian word is 'flight' but in this context I would not hesitate to use 'launch' even for a paying customer:-))

Picture taken by L. Porter
News Photography, TASS (Information Agency of the Soviet Union)



Best regards,
Irina (This part is not on the picture:-)



[Edited at 2004-11-30 19:14]


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Angel Llacuna  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:27
English to Spanish
TOPIC STARTER
the image Nov 30, 2004

I cannot help to show the photo in question (very charming):



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Natalie  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 20:27
Member (2002)
English to Russian
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Moderator of this forum
Thanks Nov 30, 2004

for the image

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xxxIreneN
United States
Local time: 13:27
English to Russian
+ ...
Good luck Dec 1, 2004

Those dogs deserve our memory and recognition - this is how the dog was sent to its glory for humans' sake, and it was a one-way ticket. I know for a fact that strong grown men could not hold tears saying goodbye to the pup...

To Alex: Ready for Launch is a phrase more appropriate when the payload with the dog is on the launcher and the whole thing is ready to fly in a few minutes. I would stick with what we actually have on the photo, let's not confuse the asker, this is not the file to be turned to the customer. Now the asker knows what he (I'm sorry, maybe she) needs to know, that's all that matters.

[Edited at 2004-12-01 07:13]

[Edited at 2004-12-01 07:13]


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Vladimir Dubisskiy  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:27
English to Russian
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собака-космонавт (не астронавт) Dec 1, 2004

I believe it was a "cosmonaut dog" (not astronaut dog) and, actually, a Soviet (not Russian)dog.


[quote]IreneN wrote:

galone_es wrote:

can anybody help to translate the following Russian text into English. I appears on the back of a photo showing a Russian astronaut dog:
quote]

Picture No.
October, 1959
Moscow

Space Explorers

Everything Is Ready For Launch (literary the Russian word is 'flight' but in this context I would not hesitate to use 'launch' even for a paying customer:-))

Picture taken by L. Porter
News Photography, TASS (Information Agency of the Soviet Union)



Best regards,
Irina (This part is not on the picture:-)



[Edited at 2004-11-30 19:14]


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Nikolai Muraviev  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 22:27
English to Russian
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Laika! The dog's name is Laika! Dec 1, 2004

Vladimir Dubisskiy wrote:

I believe it was a "cosmonaut dog" (not astronaut dog) and, actually, a Soviet (not Russian)dog.



And the dog's name is Laika.

http://phillumeny.onego.ru/labels/russian/space/page8/page8_r.html

... I see I'm wrong. This is not Laika. This is another dog. I have found more links with photos and articles on the topic:

http://palm.newsru.com/russia/05nov2002/laika.html
http://palm.newsru.com/pict/big/484757.html
http://www.rtc.ru/encyk/publish/art_030407_01.shtml

etc, etc...

[Edited at 2004-12-02 10:27]


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Angel Llacuna  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:27
English to Spanish
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks ... Dec 1, 2004

Nikolai for the Web link. You have raised an interesting topic, since I am very interested in knowing the name of the dog shown on the photo. But it is not Laika (the dog sent to space on Sputnik II); she died from overheating and panic just a few hours after the mission started (on November 1957).

Originally, the West was told that Laika had survived for several days before her life support system was exhausted and that she had then been deliberately "put to sleep"; the truth of what actually happened was not revealed until some 45 years afterwards, at the 2002 World Space Conference in Houston (USA).



[Edited at 2004-12-01 15:39]


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xxxIreneN
United States
Local time: 13:27
English to Russian
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Here they are: Dec 1, 2004

The fact that the photo dates 1959 with words "ready..." and no launch that year does not mean anything - it could have been one of the dogs 'in training' and another Soviet "victory report" for newspapers.

I will try to find out the exact name but can't promise...

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/astronomy/dogs/

Other Space Dogs
Between 1957 and 1966, the USSR (now Russia) sent 13 dogs into space in preparation for future missions. The dogs included:

Laika (meaning "Barker") - died during a mission (Sputnik 2, November 1957)
Lisichka (meaning "Little Fox") and Bars (meaning "Panther" or "Lynx") - died during a test flight on July 28, 1960
Strelka (meaning "Little Arrow") , Belka (meaning "Squirrel"), 40 mice, 2 rats and a number of plants - safely recovered from Korabl'-Sputnik-2. Launched August 19, 1960, it orbited the Earth 18 times. This was the first successful recovery of living biological specimens after an orbital mission. Strelka later gave birth to a litter of 6 healthy puppies; one was given to President John F. Kennedy as a gift.
A stamp from Bulgaria featuring Strelka, Chernushka, Zvezdochka, and Belka.
Pchelka (meaning "Little Bee") and Mushka (meaning "Little Fly")- died when Korabl'-Sputnik-3 re-entered the Earth's atmosphere at the wrong angle and burned up, (launched December 1, 1960)
Damka (meaning "Little Lady") and Krasavka (meaning "Beauty") - Launched December 22, 1960, but the third stage of the SL-3 rocket failed, and the orbital launch was aborted; the two dogs survived an unplanned suborbital flight.
Chernushka (meaning "Blackie"), a dummy cosmonaut (known as "Ivan Ivanovich"), a few mice and a guinea pig - launched March 9, 1961.
Zvezdochka (meaning "Little Star") and a dummy cosmonaut in a space suit - launched on March 25, 1961 and orbited once in final preparation for the Vostok 1 mission. Zvezdochka was named by cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin.
Verterok or Veterok (meaning "Breeze") and Ugolyok or Ugolek (meaning "Little Piece of Coal") were launched on February 22, 1966, in the satellite Kosmos 110. This was a 22-day mission.

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Russian%20space%20dogs
Compared to the picture here, she looks very much like Strelka...

[Edited at 2004-12-01 18:16]


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Angel Llacuna  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:27
English to Spanish
TOPIC STARTER
Kozyavka ( Little Gnat ) ... Dec 3, 2004

...that is the name of the lovely dog on the photo.
She is one of the most travelled of the space dogs, with four flights to her credit.
I owe all this information to Chris Dubbs, author of the book
"Space Dogs: Pioneers of Space Travel".



[Edited at 2004-12-05 08:54]


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Vladimir Dubisskiy  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:27
English to Russian
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Была "Лайка" и были "Белка" и "Стрелка" Dec 5, 2004

Но откуда я помню - не могу сказать))

Nikolai Muraviev wrote:

Vladimir Dubisskiy wrote:

I believe it was a "cosmonaut dog" (not astronaut dog) and, actually, a Soviet (not Russian)dog.



And the dog's name is Laika.



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Vladimir Dubisskiy  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:27
English to Russian
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Awesome info Dec 5, 2004

Thank you.

galone_es wrote:

...that is the name of the lovely dog on the photo.
She is one of the most travelled of the space dogs, with four flights to her credit.
I owed all this information to Chris Dubbs, author of the book
"Space Dogs: Pioneers of Space Travel".



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