Mobile menu

Business Practices in Russia
Thread poster: ejprotran

ejprotran
Local time: 06:20
English to Japanese
Jun 6, 2002

I have been contacted by a direct client in St.Petersburg, Russia. My assignment is to translate their English website into Japanese. I have the following questions for all of you who are familiar with translation practices in Russia.



1. If you take economic factors in Russia into consideration, would charging 0.08 - 0.12 USD per word sound appropriate rate for them? What seems to be decent rates for translating websites that deal with tourism, culture, and so forth?



2. What type of payment methods are available in Russia? For example, would PayPal be one of good choices for them to make payments?



3. Would it be acceptable for me to have them sign a contract before I get down to my work? Although I realize that this kind of practice prevails in the US and other regions in the world, here I\'m trying to understand what kind of business practices are currently prevalent in Russia.



I\'d appreciate any inputs from all of you.



Satoshi





Direct link Reply with quote
 

Olga Simon  Identity Verified
Hungary
Local time: 22:20
English to Russian
+ ...
Huge doubts about the rates Jun 6, 2002

Quote:


would charging 0.08 - 0.12 USD per word sound appropriate rate for them?





As far as I know agencies in Russia are looking for people willing to work for USD0.04/word +/- one cent.



I doubt that they will accept even 8 cents per word (forget about .12!).

Some of such \"heros\" even have the nerve to offer USD0.03/w for professional translation!



Anyway, it will be interesting to see what other colleagues think, especially those from Russia.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Maya Jurt  Identity Verified
Switzerland
Local time: 22:20
Member (2002)
French to German
+ ...
Who is the client? Jun 6, 2002

Hello Satoshi,

The question is: Who is the outsourcer?

Is it really a Russian firm, or rather a Russian translator outsourcing for clients in strong economy countries?



I ask you this because it has come to my knowledge that Russian Translators outsource all sorts of language comibations and justify their low prices with Russia\'s weak economy.



In fact, their clients are strong currency clients.The questions is: Does the outsourcer profit or is it the end client? Why would a Russian company ask for Translations from English to Japanese?



The example I am talking about is a translation from English to French. From a Russian translator, who does not speak French. Well, the end clinet is a Korean company. They could pay well. Do they?



So, I would ask that question first.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Irina Filippova
Local time: 16:20
English to Russian
+ ...
drive a hard bargain! Jun 6, 2002

I do not have any first hand information on the pricing of the English – Japanese translations, but it is a fairly rare combination for the Russian market. A native speaker like yourself can certainly demand a higher rate than that of Russian translators (who are not anywhere near a native speaker level in either English or Japanese).

Being a student of Japanese myself I know how overwhelming and prohibitively time-consuming this task might be for a non-native speaker, and I am willing to bet that you can convince your client that the job should be done by a native speaker.



I say you should ask for 12 cents (if you are willing to work for this amount) but be ready to accept less than that. Remember that you have a clear advantage being a native speaker - sell it for as much as you can. Good luck!



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Trudy Peters  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:20
German to English
+ ...
Something else to think about Jun 7, 2002

Satoshi,



Have you seen the English on the website? It is most likely a translation from Russian. If the quality is poor, it could be a real headache! Make sure you take a look first.



FWIW,



Trudy


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Oleg Rudavin  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 23:20
Member (2003)
English to Ukrainian
+ ...
Many does not mean all Jun 7, 2002

I\'m speaking about clients - many of them are short of currency - but not all. Many try to find the cheapest translator; but there are those who understand perfectly well that GOOD translation deserves fair payment.

Another characteristic feature of businesses in Russia is a possibility of getting a pre-payment. It\'s worth trying to get it, especially if the whole project is large.

Good luck!

Oleg


Direct link Reply with quote
 

IgorD
Russian Federation
Local time: 00:20
Chinese to Russian
+ ...
average price Jun 7, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-06-06 17:20, satnii wrote:



1. If you take economic factors in Russia into consideration, would charging 0.08 - 0.12 USD per word sound appropriate rate for them? What seems to be decent rates for translating websites that deal with tourism, culture, and so forth?







As for the Russian-Chinese pair, 0.08-0.12 is the average price on the local market ( it is first-hand information - I am mainly engaging in translation between these two languages). I think Russian-Japanese rates are close to it.



Though I suppose you can charge more, because qualified Russian-Japanese translators ( native speakers of the target language) are not readily available here.

There was a need some time ago for such translators, but I had to quit the project - the customer couldn\'t afford the price for native speaker\'s expertise.





Direct link Reply with quote
 

ejprotran
Local time: 06:20
English to Japanese
TOPIC STARTER
Umm Jun 7, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-06-06 19:28, OlgaSimon wrote:



As far as I know agencies in Russia are looking for people willing to work for USD0.04/word +/- one cent.



I doubt that they will accept even 8 cents per word (forget about .12!).

Some of such \"heros\" even have the nerve to offer USD0.03/w for professional translation!







That doesn\'t sound good to me at all. Those rates are more like discount rates applied to specific situations...

Direct link Reply with quote
 

ejprotran
Local time: 06:20
English to Japanese
TOPIC STARTER
Hello Maya Jun 7, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-06-06 19:33, mayagyan wrote:

The question is: Who is the outsourcer?

Is it really a Russian firm, or





I\'m pretty sure that they are not the outsourcer but the end client as I have been contacted by the business manager of the firm. He has provided me with the firm\'s physical address, phone numeber and other important contact information.



Quote:


The example I am talking about is a translation from English to French. From a Russian translator, who does not speak French. Well, the end clinet is a Korean company. They could pay well. Do they?





Given the information that I have been provided by them, that wouldn\'t be the case like that. Thanks a lot for sharing your story with me anyway.





[ This Message was edited by: on 2002-06-07 19:18 ]

Direct link Reply with quote
 

ejprotran
Local time: 06:20
English to Japanese
TOPIC STARTER
Positive comment Jun 7, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-06-06 19:44, Irina Filippova wrote:

I say you should ask for 12 cents (if you are willing to work for this amount) but be ready to accept less than that.





I like your positive comment very much. It also sounds realistic to me in that I\'m going to have to prepare myself accepting the lower rates than the 12 cents.



Domo Arigatou Gozaimashita



[ This Message was edited by: on 2002-06-07 19:19 ]

Direct link Reply with quote
 

ejprotran
Local time: 06:20
English to Japanese
TOPIC STARTER
British usage of spelling ... Jun 7, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-06-07 02:06, Trudy wrote:

Have you seen the English on the website? It is most likely a translation from Russian. If the quality is poor, it could be a real headache! Make sure you take a look first.





Hello Trudy.

I have checked their English website that appears to be quite decent to me, though it is based on the British usage of spelling words. I really don\'t think that I will have a trouble in translating it

Satoshi

Direct link Reply with quote
 

ejprotran
Local time: 06:20
English to Japanese
TOPIC STARTER
True... Jun 7, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-06-07 05:30, Urdvani wrote:

I\'m speaking about clients - many of them are short of currency - but not all. Many try to find the cheapest translator; but there are those who understand perfectly well that GOOD translation deserves fair payment.

Another characteristic feature of businesses in Russia is a possibility of getting a pre-payment. It\'s worth trying to get it, especially if the whole project is large.

Good luck!

Oleg





I couldn\'t agree more with your opinion. Thanks a lot for sharing the info on the business practice in Russia, too.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

ejprotran
Local time: 06:20
English to Japanese
TOPIC STARTER
Some regret.... Jun 7, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-06-07 06:10, IgorD wrote:

Though I suppose you can charge more, because qualified Russian-Japanese translators ( native speakers of the target language) are not readily available here.





Well...actually what I\'m going to do with this client is to translate their website written in English into Japanese. You are right to say that I could charge more due to the fact that there were not so many Russian-Japanese translators readily available in the market. As for the Russian language, the only thing that I know is how to read Cyrillic alphabets that I have learned in a rudimentary Russian course in college. I wish I would have dug into it more!

Direct link Reply with quote
 

ttagir  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:20
Member (2002)
English to Russian
+ ...
The way I would choose Jun 15, 2002

Dear Niitsu-san,



If the company is rather reliable and serious (you may ask and write me directly on the matter, since I am sure you have not yet signed NDA with them ), then I am convinced that you should not take into account an economical situation, rates, etc. I am sure you should inform them about your level of competence (please note that you are not simply transalting a site, but, indeed, realizing a localization! - I am absolutely sure that, in order to make this Japanese part of their site to appear correctly, it would not be enough to translate only; I am sure you should know a bit the detail of Inet localizing into Japanese; and this is quite another money and rates!). Afterwards, you should state your price, taking into account that part of the possible job (to cooperate for right appearance of their site in Japanese). Therefore, USD 0.12 per source word is not something unreal for a pro job. If they cannot support this rate, you may aks them about the price they are thinking about. You should not agree with rates beyond your level. (I am sure also that all of us should do the same).



Some people are happy to buy a $250 old car, while other people strive for a new Rolls-Royce... I remember one ad I saw some 20 years ago (in Newsweek or something similar): there was shown a bottle of a very good whiskey (Chivas Regal?) and words: \"Of course, you can live without Chivas. The question is: how well?..\"

So, I am sure they can live without a professional translation into Japanese. The question is how well



About the ways to ensure that your job will be paid: You may ask them to transfer the sum via so-called \"irrevocable letter of credit\" (which means that you will see that the sum has been arrived and will be paid as soon as they give the certain order to your bank). Another way (which is also simple, but strangely is not yet used by many ProZers...) is to put the money to your ProZ wallet: You may give them a promise --- As soon as you will see this money arrived to your wallet, you start the job. You may also promise that will not take this money from ProZ wallet until they will get the result. If they are not agree with your quality of translation you will (you may again promise this) send their money back to them (e.g., as a bank cheque). They therefore will lose some 5% if the results will not be good enough for them. As for you, you will be ensured that all is paid.



[I wonder why we in ProZ have not yet arranged a scheme of this sort to avoid non-payment risks]...



Detail in this scheme may vary, but the idea is not too bad We should use the power of ProZ!



Yours,

Tagir.



PS. Due to too many jobs I am trying to manage for now I often cannot visit ProZ site and forums for weeks. So, you may write me directly to the address:

ttagirov@ksu.ru .

Please accept also my congratulations on occasion of the progress of the Japan football team on World Cup!


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Business Practices in Russia

Advanced search


Translation news in Russian Federation





Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »
CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs