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Security number of a credit card
Thread poster: Ivana de Sousa Santos

Ivana de Sousa Santos  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 16:09
French to Portuguese
+ ...
Dec 31, 2005

Hello everybody!

I'm posting this thread although it has nothing to do with translation because Proz.com has a large community and I'd like to read some opinions on this subject.

I'm thinking of travelling to Switzerland in February. Yesterday I went to easyjet's site and wanted to book and pay my trip with credit card.

Everything was OK until they asked me for the security number of the credit card I was using (my husband's in this case).

The bank always tells us to never give this number to anyone since it gives access to our bank information, but without it I can't book my flight.

Do you think this is a sort of pishing? The site I went to was www.easyjet.com.

My husband has already made a payment through Internet with his credit card and this number was never asked.

Thank you in advance for any comments.
Ivana


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Natalie  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 17:09
Member (2002)
English to Russian
+ ...
Moving the thread Dec 31, 2005

to the Safe Computing forum

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Ivana UK  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:09
Member (2005)
Italian to English
It's an anti-fraud measure Dec 31, 2005

Ivana de Sousa Santos wrote:

The bank always tells us to never give this number to anyone since it gives access to our bank information, but without it I can't book my flight.



Hi Ivana,

I work for one of the UKs largest retail banks and can confirm that it is perfectly safe to to give out your card security code to a trusted company. The three or four-digit code (depending on the type of card) is an additional anti-fraud measure specifically for telephone and internet purchases (where no PIN or signature is required).

The code, unlike a PIN or signature, does not on its own allow access to the funds within your account, to online banking or to any account details. It is perfectly safe to provide this to a retailer during the course of a telephone/internet purchase - it's there for your security!

I would speak to your bank again, maybe the person who gave you the above info misunderstood and thought you were referring to a PIN (or maybe they simply didn't know what the security code is!!)

Hope this puts your mind at rest.

I'm off out now to celebrate the New Year - hope you have a good one!!

Ivana (I always find it strange writing to someone with the same name !!)


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Peter Bouillon  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 17:09
Member (2005)
French to German
+ ...
Security number vs. PIN Jan 1, 2006

Ivana de Sousa Santos wrote:
Everything was OK until they asked me for the security number of the credit card I was using (my husband's in this case).
The bank always tells us to never give this number to anyone


Don't confuse the security number with the PIN.

The PIN is a secret combination that is provided to you through separate communication. It is not written anywhere on your card. You should never give the PIN of your banking cards to anyone, including the employees of your own bank.

The security number, however, is a three or four digit combination on the back of your card. It is used as a low-level security measure: If some crook has learned your card number somehow (for instance by pinching a bill), s/he cannot withdraw money in your name without knowing the security number too (which will NOT be written on bills). This is only a safety measure against crooks that know your card number but haven't physically seen your card. Anyone you hand your card to will instantly know your security number; they only need to turn your card and read it from the backside.

If you do business in the Internet, you cannot physically hand your card to the merchant you do business with. So you need to enter the security number manually.

P.


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elle_bi  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:09
English to Italian
+ ...
Moreover... Jan 2, 2006

...Easyjet is a serious company; I've flown with them several times and I've always booked my flights through their website. Also, many hotels ask for the security number when reserving through the Internet: as said, it's a safety procedure. Enjoy your trip!

[Edited at 2006-01-02 09:15]


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Ivana de Sousa Santos  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 16:09
French to Portuguese
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you for your feedback Jan 27, 2006

I'm sorry I didn't come earlier to thank you for your answers.

- IVANA (It's so weird to call my name to someone else; I've never done so because I've never met anyone with our name):
Thank you for your information about the security codes. Actually they just ask for the LAST 3 numbers of that code, which my husband didn't quite understand. Now everything is clear.

- PETER:
I wasn't confusing this number with the pin, but thank you for your additional information.

- ELLE_BI:
I never thought easyjet wasn't a serious company. My mum has already travelled with easyjet and had no problems.

By the way, the trip is paid and I'll be travelling with my baby-boy next month. :0)

Best regards to all of you,
Ivana


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