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Best way to backup?
Thread poster: Joanne Parker

Joanne Parker  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:51
German to English
+ ...
Apr 1, 2003

Hello,



Yesterday my motherboard died. One minute it was there and working, the next minute it was dead. I took it to the PC clinic and they told me there was nothing they could do with it - it was only a year and a half old.



Fortunately, it wasn\'t my usual PC that I use on a daily basis, so I can still work and I still have all my data on this PC. But I\'m now VERY aware of the need to backup on a daily basis.



I\'ve checked the Forum entries here and see that Jerzy recommends Norton Ghost. But this seems to be for using the same PC only. What happens if the motherboard on this machine goes and I need to access my data from a different machine, running a different operating system?



Any help you can give me would be gratefully received. But go easy on me - I\'m still in shock after the death of my old PC!



Thanks,



Joanne



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gamingman
Hungary
Local time: 18:51
English to Hungarian
With Ghost... Apr 1, 2003

...you cannot make a complete system restore on a different machine (unless you have the very same configuration) due to different hardware components.

Anyway, if you pull out your HDD (hard drive, and put it in the new one, plus install Ghost on the new one, as well, you will be able to make partial recovery (from under Windows!), I mean, you can select what files to restore.



If you use Windows 2000, or higher, you can make use of the built-in Ntbackup utility, which I use for daily backups, running them as scheduled tasks, when I\'m in bed.



Quote:


On 2003-04-01 12:30, parker wrote:

Hello,



Yesterday my motherboard died. One minute it was there and working, the next minute it was dead. I took it to the PC clinic and they told me there was nothing they could do with it - it was only a year and a half old.



Fortunately, it wasn\'t my usual PC that I use on a daily basis, so I can still work and I still have all my data on this PC. But I\'m now VERY aware of the need to backup on a daily basis.



I\'ve checked the Forum entries here and see that Jerzy recommends Norton Ghost. But this seems to be for using the same PC only. What happens if the motherboard on this machine goes and I need to access my data from a different machine, running a different operating system?



Any help you can give me would be gratefully received. But go easy on me - I\'m still in shock after the death of my old PC!



Thanks,



Joanne





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Carsten Behrend  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 18:51
English to German
+ ...
Deinstall Hard Disk Apr 1, 2003

Hallo Joanne!



Why don\'t you just deinstall (remove) the hard disk drive from the computer that crashed? Or am I getting you somehow wrong?



Take the deinstalled drive and insert it into the machine which is working properly. It requires some fine feeling when connecting power and board connectors. But it is feasible. Give it a try!



Carsten


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Andrzej Lejman  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:51
German to Polish
+ ...
Joanne, Apr 1, 2003

a motherboard is only one part in a computer - it can be replaced. Since it isn\'t very old, there should be no problem to find a proper type for your CPU and main memory. You don\'t need to abandon other parts because of the motherboard.

Good luck!

Andrzej


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Sheila Hardie  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 18:51
Member
Catalan to English
+ ...
What about for a Mac? Apr 1, 2003

Funnily enough, I was just going to ask about backup systems today - my laptop (a Mac PowerBook G4) was making weird noises yesterday and I am a bit concerned



What would the best and easiest way to backup a Mac - unfortunately, I haven\'t got another computer, so I can\'t transfer it to another machine very easily.



I\'d greatly appreciate any advice on this.



I hope you manage to retrieve any information you lost, Joanne



Sheila


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Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:51
German to English
+ ...
Backup under Windows 2000 Pro? Apr 1, 2003

Quote:


If you use Windows 2000, or higher, you can make use of the built-in Ntbackup utility, which I use for daily backups, running them as scheduled tasks, when I\'m in bed.





How do you do this? I tried to run the built-in backup program on my machine running Win 2000 Pro and it would not let me back up to a CD. A check of the Microsoft knowledgebase confirmed that this does not work with my configuration. I have probably hundreds of MB of files, so burning a CD is the only feasible method to make backups; however, this is cumbersome on a daily basis.

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Mónica Machado
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:51
English to Portuguese
+ ...
I use a zip drive Apr 1, 2003

Hello,



I know this might be an old fashioned process but so far I can\'t really complain.



I make a copy of the document I am currently working everyday before shuting down the machine.



If I have another machine ready to work with all programs there up and running and my main computer has a nervous breakdown I can simply connect the zip drive to the other computer and download my file onto that machine. Since I backup everyday (and keep uncleaned files on a zip disk too) I very rarely have any trouble for real...



Well, I got this system two years ago when I had 2 virus in 3 days and almost lost my mind all together



Now I am so much used to to that daily back up of current document that it is part of my routine.



You can also do it on a CD but it seems a zip disk is best for that daily process.



Well, if you have any different opinion, do share it.



Best regards,

Mónica









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gamingman
Hungary
Local time: 18:51
English to Hungarian
With Ntbackup... Apr 1, 2003

... you can backup your data either to a file, or to a tape device.

I do backup to file on one of several hard disks in my computer. It\'s fast, provides adequate protection against system failure, and you don\'t have to burn CD-s, although periodically it is desirable.



Quote:


On 2003-04-01 13:06, Daina wrote:

Quote:


If you use Windows 2000, or higher, you can make use of the built-in Ntbackup utility, which I use for daily backups, running them as scheduled tasks, when I\'m in bed.





How do you do this? I tried to run the built-in backup program on my machine running Win 2000 Pro and it would not let me back up to a CD. A check of the Microsoft knowledgebase confirmed that this does not work with my configuration. I have probably hundreds of MB of files, so burning a CD is the only feasible method to make backups; however, this is cumbersome on a daily basis.



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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:51
Flemish to English
+ ...
Powerquest Apr 1, 2003

With Powerquest diskcopy you can make a clone of your hard-disk. Best to have one aside, so that when the HD crashes, you can quickly open up your pc and replace the HD with the clone. Otherwise tapes might be the solution (higher storage capacity).

Some basic knowledge of how a pc is built might come handy for everybody using that tool. It is a useful tool, but it does not last forever.


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xxxWayne Sutton
Local time: 18:51
French to English
email for backup Apr 1, 2003

If the files are not too long I generally send the file I\'m working from my laptop to my desktop by email at the end of each day. I have dedicated email addresses for this (laptop@etc and desktop@etc) but you can do it with just one address with a bit of care. i.e.

Use only the \"send\" message facility when you log on otherwise the machine you are sending from may try to download the message before you have a chance to get to the other machine.You can also setup the sending machine mail package to leave messages on the server, that way any mail you download can still be downloaded by the other machine next time you logon.



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Boyan Kostadinov  Identity Verified
Bulgarian to English
+ ...
Hard Drives, Backups & Norton Ghost Apr 2, 2003

Ghost can be used to completely restore your install but I don\'t recommend it for your purposes. Because of different hardware and other issues (such as the image Ghost would make of all your data will be too big to store anywhere) Ghost is best used for preserving a complete install of your operating system and all applications installed so next time you want to reinstall Windows you don\'t have to start from scratch but can just use the Ghost image (and it only takes 10 minutes to be back up and running with a fresh install of Windows)



If you like to save your files from a crashed motherboard, you can simply take the Hard Disk out and connect to the motherboard in your second PC. Backup on a daily basis won\'t hurt you but it\'s not really needed.



On somewhat related note, as a general rule, you want to keep your operating system files and your data (personal files) on separate Hard Disks or separate partitions of the Hard Disk.



Having beeing dealing with hardware for a few years now here is what I do so I don\'t loose data:

- Burn what\'s really important

- Keep multiple copies on different Hard Drives


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Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:51
German to English
+ ...
Great ideas Apr 2, 2003

These sound like great ideas. However, I am not an advanced computer user. I would say I\'m intermediate - I know how to use applications, but operating system details and hardware are a mystery to me. Is it hard to install additional hard drives? Sounds like that would be a good solution for me.

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Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 18:51
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
My solution.... Apr 2, 2003

I have three computers in a small ethernet network. I do EVERYTHING with Trados (I put the lot into one big memory and always use the project and filter settings to tell jobs apart), so I regularly export my Trados memory from my desktop (standard computer) to my laptop, together with all my admin and terminology files.



Alison


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sylvie malich
Germany
Local time: 18:51
German to English
Pen drive Apr 2, 2003

How about just getting a pen drive and regularly putting your backups on that? They have from 16 MB to 1 GB of memory. More than that you don\'t need. Besides, you can get one these days from 49-69 euro and you don\'t have to install anything, just plug it in your USB port and transfer your data. Should there be a hard disk crash or virus attack, just take it to the next computer and plug it in.

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Uldis Liepkalns  Identity Verified
Latvia
Local time: 19:51
Member (2003)
English to Latvian
+ ...
Additional hard drives Apr 2, 2003

Quote:


Os it hard to install additional hard drives? Sounds like that would be a good solution for me.





I use removable 20 Gb hard drive which is placed in the free slot between CD writer and reader. (I do not actually remove it every time, it can be turned on and off with a key- but you do it ONLY when computer is shut down). That means you have to restart computer before and after the backup.

Why removable- I have had nasty experience with backuping all on the second stationary hard disk, and when the FAT (file allocation table- file where disc content is listed, something like a library catalogue) went, it did so on BOTH hard discs simultaneously. The data was still there, but Windows didn\'t see it…. It was restored manually via Linux, but it was no cheap venture, therefore I now turn the second disc on only during backup. I also make daily backups on CDRW, and so feel pretty safe.



But the idea of backup on USB pen drive also seems not bad- if you have to backup not so much data. And it, probably, is the best solution for laptops.


[addsig]

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